Jump to content

The Platt Thread


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 210
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

We may not have Bruni to kick around much longer, and it's not like we've overlooked Adam Platt in the past, but maybe it's time he had his own thread.   From his review of Table 8:     lin

I think they were trying to avoid the kind of response that Dave Santos got on that reprehensible Chowhound thread: don't bully a baby.   (As I posted on CH: a BABY charging $160 a meal!!!!!)

Why? You've already been to Rebelle.

There may indeed be economic and social pressures which will bury fine dining. What I reject is the cocky assurance that tweaked up picnic food is every bit as good. Pass the buttermilk fried pizza with elevated mac’n’cheese.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But I don't think it will bury all fine dining.  Maybe the new places (which I guess Platt, et al. are referring to) opening up (Carne Mare), or old places changing to crazy, even more expensive menus, for ostensibly ideological reasons (EMP) have no future.

But is it going to sink Le Bernardin? Doubtful, in my opinion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For whatever its worth, my wife and I were playing Uber a month  or so to go and had 2 1/2 hours to kill. We did a food/drink crawl in midtown. First stop was Oceana. Outside was packed with mostly young people. Inside was empty. Last stop was the lounge at Le Bernardin. Inside the restaurant proper was full with a lot of energy. Surprising to me how young the crowd was. The lounge was relatively full as well. We sat at the bar and everything we ate and drank was simply outstanding. And Eric Ripert was there and looked very happy. 

I agree with JTF, this place isn't going anywhere because of how people want to eat. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, joethefoodie said:

But I don't think it will bury all fine dining.  Maybe the new places (which I guess Platt, et al. are referring to) opening up (Carne Mare), or old places changing to crazy, even more expensive menus, for ostensibly ideological reasons (EMP) have no future.

But is it going to sink Le Bernardin? Doubtful, in my opinion.

I agree. Fine dining in NYC was significantly downsized way before the pandemic. It was years ago we were asking what happened to places like Union Pacific. It may not grow as a sector, but I don't think it will literally disappear.

Of course, we can adjust what we mean by fine dining. Thinking about my recent trip to Providence. Two meals, one in quite a classical fine dining space with formal service, the other in a brightly lit, cafe-like space, very informal. But the latter had the more ambitious and precise cuisine. Are they both fine dining?

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Wilfrid said:

. Thinking about my recent trip to Providence. Two meals, one in quite a classical fine dining space with formal service, the other in a brightly lit, cafe-like space, very informal. But the latter had the more ambitious and precise cuisine. Are they both fine dining?

Interesting thing about Providence, isn't it?  I seem to have had quite a few good meals there over the years, be it in a "fine dining" setting as you mention, or in a more casual setting where the food was even more ambitious and precise.

One thing I know for sure is that whatever it is the seekers of the moment are seeking, be it the Mightie burgers at Jeremiah and Fabian's new place, Platt's "3* tacos" or Korean rice dogs, none of those qualify as fine dining.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There will always be places where one can celebrate a special occasion.  We spent our anniversary weekend in a town 20 minutes from our house, and while it was nice to go to The Beer Baron the first night, it was nicer to go to the fancy new Greek restaurant the second night and have good food, well-trained service, and a $21 glass of a wonderful South African dessert wine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One way to look at what's happened to our food culture is that taste used to be set by discerning rich people.  Their taste set the standard that was generally followed.

While certain foodworld personalities/board-survey operators think this is still the case, it isn't.

On the one hand, this leads to Wilf's elevated mac 'n cheese.  But on the other hand, it leads to Fradei (is THAT fine dining?).

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Sneakeater said:

But on the other hand, it leads to Fradei (is THAT fine dining?).

It's fine enough for me, in terms of the food and the service. Next time I'm wearing a jacket!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Now, with people struggling all over the city, and fashionable tastes veering — as they have been for years — toward three-star tacos, burgers, and bowls of ramen...

... “But in the end, they’re all the same. They serve the same caviar or oysters to start, the same butter-poached-lobster course and then beef or duck to finish...”

Sorry, I don't buy his premise. There is a huge place in fine dining between food truck and golf club lunch, at least outside of New York. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hyperbole. A lot of them are similar, but they are by no means "all the same." Yes, you can eat oysters, lobster and duck at Le Coucou (if it was open), but there are plenty of other things you can eat too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...