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A question for mongo or giri: I'm trying to do something with this rather unfamiliar veg for the first time right now. Recipe says cut off hard parts, boil till tender, then cook in the masala. I realised quickly that cutting off the hard parts left nothing, so I stopped. They are currently boiling, cut in 4" lengths, and have been doing so for a while :D

 

Any advice on best way to treat these blighters?

 

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G's mother uses them all the time in Sambar, a spicy South Indian soup made with lentils and veggies.

 

I'll ask her when I get a chance...I have never actually cooked them myself. I think she cuts them lengthwise inhalves... so that that they cook more quickly in about 4" pieces.

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Well, in conclusion they went straight in the bin - seemed to consist mainly of string :D There must be a way of making them edible but I can't work out how to get rid of the string without decimating them.

 

On the other hand the spicy coconutty sauce they went in is quite spendid, scenting the house, and I'm making some rice to go with it.

 

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Well, it looks like a drumstick :D

 

Very long, thin, green, ridged, tapers at the very ends. Only find it in Indian shops.

 

Oh but that sauce is wonderful, if hot, made thus: 1/4 tsp cumin seeds and 4-5 dried chillies (I used long Thai ones, seeded) ground (in the little coffee grinder I use for spices), then pounded in Thai mortar along with 3 cloves garlic, small piece of ginger and couple of teaspoons grated fresh coconut. Smallish onion thinly sliced and fried in butter (can't be bothered with ghee). Using a kind of aluminium karahi pan bought years ago in Southall, a 100% Indian enclave not so far from where I live, with the thickest gauge aluminium I've ever seen - only downside being the handles get as hot as the pan. Once nice and golden brown, add masala paste and fry briefly, add 1/4 tsp each garam masala (Seasoned Pioneers - bloody fantastic - will never buy any other again) & turmeric, 1/2 tsp jaggery, salt, 5fl oz tamarind water and 10fl oz coconut milk (tinned - n.b. avoid all tinned coconut milk with additives - look carefully at the label on purchase :huh: ). Bring to boil, cook gently for 15 minutes. Use as desired. The only really good thing I've come across in a book of Indian recipes by one Premila Lal.

 

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sorry--i didn't see this thread until now. "drumsticks" are used msotly (though not exclusively) in a lot of south indian cooking. the stringiness you mention doesn't bother its adherents. they go into sambhar, yes, but also into other things (and i don't know that i would call sambhar a soup).

 

i don't cook with them but there's lots of people on the another subcontinent food forums who do and who could give you recipes. quite apart from everything else drumsticks are apparently extremely good for you.

 

http://www.anothersubcontinent.com/forums/...hp?showforum=10

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garam masala (Seasoned Pioneers - bloody fantastic - will never buy any other again)

 

i've always meant to try their Raz-Al-Hanout, now i have a reason to place an order.

 

Have you tried any other spices/blends from Seasoned Pioneers?

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I have the ras-el-hanout, used once. No particular impression but I'm forgetful and it might not have been a good context. A couple of curry powders (Sria Lanka and Zanzibar) bought in emergency recently when there was a sudden curry powder crisis during preparation of the Thai dinner and Pim NEEDED some. Not used myself yet as I rarely use curry powder. Also have Berbere that I haven't opened yet.

 

I think one of the secrets is the packaging which keeps the spices sealed and without air, even once you've opened it. No need to decant which always adds to the spoiling process.

 

Will pay more attention to Seasoned Pioneers in the future - I had thought they were just a bit of clever marketing.

 

n.b. the garam masala is quite different from what I've ever bought in an Indian shop. Some might find the cinnamon/cloves element too strong.

 

Thanks Mongo. I did detect a most delicate flavour briefly in between the strings, but they did for me :D

 

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  • 2 months later...

hey mongo - i found your old post on eG on New Vegetables - have you had a chance to try them yet and do you mind to repost pictures if you still have them?

I got some tindora and guvar today as well as some gourgeous looking fenugreek leaves - those will be used tomorrow for Methi Murgh . But i still need some ideas for tindora and guvar: bunch of recipes are there on eG but i can't find anything in my cookboks yet...

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hey mongo - i found your old post on eG on New Vegetables - have you had a chance to try them yet and do you mind to repost pictures if you still have them?

I got some tindora and guvar today as well as some gourgeous looking fenugreek leaves - those will be used tomorrow for Methi Murgh . But i still need some ideas for tindora and guvar: bunch of recipes are there on eG but i can't find anything in my cookboks yet...

i believe there may be suggestions for tindora on another subcontinent's food forums. i'll check later, but if you have time here's the link to our recipes forum. you're likelier to get responses much quicker there, even if almost everyone is gone for the holidays.

 

are you asking for pictures of said veg or of finished dishes? if latter, i never did buy or cook them--this was pre another subcontinent...hmmm maybe i should try them now that i have people from the region they're most popular in to guide me...

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hey mongo - i found your old post on eG on New Vegetables - have you had a chance to try them yet and do you mind to repost pictures if you still have them?

I got some tindora and guvar today as well as some gourgeous looking fenugreek leaves - those will be used tomorrow for Methi Murgh . But i still need some ideas for tindora and guvar: bunch of recipes are there on eG but i can't find anything in my cookboks yet...

i believe there may be suggestions for tindora on another subcontinent's food forums. i'll check later, but if you have time here's the link to our recipes forum. you're likelier to get responses much quicker there, even if almost everyone is gone for the holidays.

 

are you asking for pictures of said veg or of finished dishes? if latter, i never did buy or cook them--this was pre another subcontinent...hmmm maybe i should try them now that i have people from the region they're most popular in to guide me...

there's a suggestion for a simple recipe in the second post in this thread

 

and i see i asked this question there too some time ago and got some basic responses which assume that the cook in question is used to cooking indian veg. dishes. generally the message seems to be that they don't need any special handling.

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