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2010 David Duband Cote de Nuits-Village

 

Before Chambo correctly points it out, let me acknowledge that I understand that this is a New Word style Burgundy...Cherries! Dark stuff (spices and minerals)! But not too dark! Cuz this is simple happy Burgundy! For shiny happy people!

 

Interesting. How common are 'New World style' Burgundies? The current reigning paradigm privileges Burgundy over Bordeaux in part because the latter is perceived to have sold out in making bigger, arguably more Californian, Parker-validated wines [though this probably would have happened to some extent anyhow owing to climate change].

 

Edited: I should like to be dark yet shiny, and could probably do with a higher frequency of happiness. Drinking hipster Old World wines has done little for me in this regard.

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I read all these threads about these fabulous dinners people have at home, with photogenic, obviously labor-intensive food, and legendary bottles.   I can't speak for anybody else on this board, bu

If I'm not enjoying wine when I'm seventy, then my nieces and nephews are going to be stuck with a shitload of wine they won't know what to do with.   Or my next wife, who by then should be almost

Whaddya mean? That's more than half the meals I serve. Tossed with great care, I might add.

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Rib end pork chop with ground cherry/sage sauce. Eggplant/tomato mush on the side.

 

I remember years ago going to this Soho restaurant that aped the opening format of Craft. They had a list of proteins. They had a list of sauces. They had a list of side dishes. Putting it together was up to you. I even asked the waitress for recommendations -- but she made clear that assembling the dinner was my job.

 

When I finally put something together and submitted my order, she gave me a look that virtually reeked, "Ewwwwwwwww!" I was pretty upset. If you're gonna make me put together a dinner myself, don't mock me for my choices.

 

I'm saying this because I recognize that tonight's side dish in no way complemented my main dish. I just had to make it because the ingredients were coming close to rotting in my refrigerator and I had to get them moving. I make no claims for this as a coherent dinner.

 

Interestingly, though -- proving that the transitive property doesn't apply to wine pairings -- there are plenty of wines that go well with both the main and the side, even though they don't particularly go with each other. I chose one that went maximallly well -- sensationally well, you might even say -- with the pork, and pretty well with the eggplant.

 

2013 Bodegas y Viñedos Ponce Buena Pinta

 

I've drunk a good deal of this wine lately -- which means that I've written a good deal about it. To recap, it's a fairly new addition to the line of the young winemaker who's almost singlehandedly rescued Manchuela, elevating it from a workhorse denomination to one whose wines you'd seek out (from the right producers). He's done this mainly by taking local workhorse grapes and vinifying them as serious good wines. (I'd love for him to come to New York and do Concord.)

 

His various Bobals are really really good. But this -- based mainly on the even more obscure Moravia Agria (with ever-drecreasing amounts of Grenache thrown in to allay everyone's fear) -- is even better still, to my taste. Fruity but elegantly so, more reticent (if you didn't want to raise false hopes, you'd say Burgundian) than the more rough-and-ready Bobal. But still bright and fruity. Really, a nearly perfect midweek wine. And the cherry and even orange fruit, with its incense/spice follow-up, was just perfect for the ground cherry/sage sauce on the pork. (The wine itself is a perfect weight for pork: not heavy, in other words.)

 

This wine appears to me to be getting better and better as it goes along -- but (notwithstanding some things I've read people saying on the 'net) I don't see it improving much long term. As if there's a chance I'd fail to drink my stash up short-term in any event.

 

I really need to thank P.J.'s (in New York) for turning me on to this.

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Now I'm just getting drunk and mellow -- "Give me a few beers and I'll like anybody," as my friend Katie put it in college -- but I really want to recommend that you guys try this wine in whatever vintage is available. It really is pretty special for below $20. In its way, it's kinda what I like about wine.

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See, this is the sort of thing that happens nowadays: region I've never heard of, variey I've probably never heard of, rescued from obscurity but somehow with respect for local tradition and terroir [whereas 20 years ago, it would have been transplanted French varieties and globetrotting, globalising winemakers]. But do all these regions and grapes actually have such potential? I expect most of them were obscure for a reason.

 

If we could still afford the usual suspects, how often would we be drinking these new old wines? There are prevailing ideologies with strong moral flavours that would probably encourage this even without the disruptive effect of Chinese and hedge-fund bro demand, but are Bed-Stuy and lamb neck really such great options?

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Neocon has a very strong case here. I grew up eating offal. Love it. When I came to the States, it was very scarce indeed on (non-"ethnic") restaurant menus. In a way it's good that it's now so common. Not so good that the price has gone up, because restaurants still need to make the same margin (and it's familiarity has had a knock-on effect on retail pricing). Yes, diversity is good, but it's driven by cost and not sudden open-mindedness in these cases.

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It occurs to me that economic determinism works both ways. Bordeaux produces great great wine, sure. But the reason it became preeminent is that the region is located by a harbor with easy access to England.

 

It's obviously true that all these unfamiliar wines are now becoming easily available because the old classics have been priced out of the general market. But that doesn't end the discussion any more than it used to end discussions of Brooklyn when Orik pointed out that the first of the current wave of residents moved there because they couldn't afford to live in Manhattan. Sure -- but what did they find/develop when they reached Brooklyn?

 

Similarly, so what if all these revived local grapes are becoming available because the mass of wine drinkers can no longer afford good Bordeaux? The question is, how good are the revived grapes? And that can only be answered, of course, on a case-by-case basis.

 

And while the reason these wines are now available may be based on economic factors relating to the pricing of other, better-known wines, why shouldn't we be happy to have to the opportunity to try them?

 

While I'm not arguing that any of these grapes could have "been" Cabernet Sauvignon, it is well to remember that Cabernet Sauvignon's dominance arose from historically contingent circumstances of geography and trade, not just from some self-evident superiority.

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Let's take Greece as an example. There are a wealth of red wine grapes that we're learning about from there that are now being produced up to a good standard. These grapes may have been around since the dawn of winemaking. They lack international prominence not because of their self-evident inferiority, but because Greece is, well, Greece, and lacked both a well-oiled export machine and easy access to Western European markets.

 

Some of these "revived" Greek red wines turn out to be good, some fair, some excellent. Who wouldn't be grateful for the chance to try them?

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It occurs to me that economic determinism works both ways. Bordeaux produces great great wine, sure. But the reason it became preeminent is that the region is located by a harbor with easy access to England.

 

 

There's a problem with that argument, which is that other regions with easy historical access to the English market didn't achieve the reputation of Bordeaux. Access was a necessary condition of it becoming one of the world's top wine regions, but it wasn't a sufficient condition.

 

Now all I need is a few good examples, but since I'm multi-tasking all I'm thinking of is that sherry and Madeira didn't achieve comparative enduring success. But there must be more on-point examples--although surely any French or Spanish wine region with ready access to a port is no worse off than Bordeaux.

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