Jump to content
Sneakeater

The Rest of Us

Recommended Posts

The pan roasting game birds thing will be part of my repertory, along with how to de-salt bacalao in 20 minutes, when I am a gaga toothless bum who nobody listens to.

 

Wait guys, don’t be cruel...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jah, Sneak, but it's a smaller proportion of your total life lived so far, so it ought to be less alarming. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you eat small birds without teeth?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jah, Sneak, but it's a smaller proportion of your total life lived so far, so it ought to be less alarming. ;)

 

With all due respect, I think you have that exactly backwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scrambled eggs with truffles.  Spinach salad on the side

 

I wanted a sparkling wine.  In my slavish devotion to Geographical Correctness, I grabbed this when I realized I had it.

 

2008 La Spinetta Vigneto Biancospino Moscato d'Asti

 

This wine isn't meant to age.  This wine is meant to be drunk the minute it's released.  But after Daniel and A's wedding, where I got this as swag (THANKS GUYS!), I put it away and forgot about it.  Until it hit me this afternoon, as I was thinking about dinner, that I had this Piemontese sparkler from long ago sitting somewhere.  And I even remembered where!

 

Now maybe a sweet wine isn't what you want with truffles.  But you know what?  It was fine.  And the 10-year delay in drinking it didn't do any irreparable harm.  It wasn't bright -- but the sweet peach flavor didn't cloy at all.  It was quite nice, actually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

E593-F507-AA45-4484-A514-0-DDD7855482-B.

 

But can you not be tempted by the Tempranillo/cab blend Grop?

 

I actually don’t know if you can drink Grop at El Glop, but Grop is very nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scottish fried herring.  (Don't tell any Scots, but in the absence of oatmeal, I used buckwheat flour.)

 

Scottish potato-kale salad on the side.  (Don't tell any Scots, but I threw in a Jerusalem artichoke.)

 

I thought long and hard about the wine.  It occurred to me that a Kerner would be very good.  But I don't have any Kerner.  Then I remembered that Gemischter Satz -- that Viennese field blend that is one of the world's most delightful quaffs now that the Viennese have stopped adulterating it with antifreeze -- is an ideal pairing for fried light white fish.  Of course, herring is not a light white fish.  But I chose a rather big (for this type of wine) Gemischter Satz.

 

2016 Jutta Ambrositch Grinzinger Gemischter Satz "Glockenturm"

 

Still not big enough for the herring, I'm afraid.

 

But what a nice wine -- even at this advanced age Gemischter Satzes are never meant to reach.  Apples, pears, more apples, more pears, dead leaves.  A little more sour at the finish than a fresh young Gemischter Satz would be, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does not have the flinty taste I associate with Chablis, but the Kirkland 2017 Chablis Premier Cru (at about $19) tastes delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grouse, pan-roasted the Wilfrid Way (there, happy?).  Stuffed with cranberries, and under a rather nice cranberry/brandy sauce.  (If you're wondering whether cranberries go well with grouse:  yes, they do.)  Roasted Marina di Chioga squash on the side, and sautéed kale.

 

It was stupid and hubristic to plan to make a grouse dinner after an opera that let out at 11:30 in Manhattan.  But stupidity and hubris are well stocked at Chez Sneak.  The grouse was cooked more on the rare side than I tend to like -- but it was late; I wanted to eat and go to bed (after writing this "The Rest of Us" post, of course).  To tell you the truth, it was good that way.

 

The grouse/cranberry combo seemed to bucking for a Burgundy.  The only grandish (not very) Burgs I have here in my apartment aren't ready to drink, even though some of them have what seem to be a lot of years.  So a very not-grandish Burg.

 

2015 Domaine Cornu-Camus Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Beaune

 

The first rule of buying good cheap Burgundy is:  there is no good cheap Burgundy.  On the other hand, though, at around $20 a bottle, this wasn't much more expensive than the equivalent California Pinot Noir would have been.

 

So there's some fruit at the start -- but nothing terribly vivid.  And there are indeed some secondary flavors -- but they're completely indistinct:  you can tell they're there, but not what they are. (OK:  anise is one.)  And that's it.

 

Not a bad horrible wine.  But not really worthy of drinking at home.  Certainly not on a Friday.  With grouse.  After Der Rosenkavalier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a grouse, and will probably cook it a ma facon 🧑‍🍳. Haven’t focused on accompaniments, but I have prunes and they probably go with grouse too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tajarin with white truffles.  Raw radicchio tardivo dressed with a vinaigrette on the side.

 

OK, I'll come clean:  they weren't really tajarin.  They were tajarin's slightly southern eggless sibling, tagliarini.  So I put on a very little bit of a carbonara-style egg sauce (minus the pepper) (and God knows the guanchiale) -- supplemented by the traditional ton of butter that the truffles desire.

 

The pairing was preordained.  And perfect.

 

2006 San Fereolo Dolcetto di Dogliani

 

See, the thing about this meal here is that I balanced the extra richness of the egg-enhanced pasta with the bitter radicchio and a bitter wine.

 

One thing I learned from Daniel and A's Piemonte wedding years ago is that the Dolcetto made in Dogliani towers over all other Dolcetto.  (They threw an opening-night dinner in that charming Dolcetto-drenched town.)  That town, little known as a wine spot here then although somewhat better known here now, is ground zero for this grape.

 

And, I have to say, San Fereolo is my dead-certain favorite of the Dogliani Dolcettos.  It's organic, and even natural -- but it doesn't taste like a natural wine.  It tastes like the most focused and characteristic, and yet almost elegant, Dolcetto you'll ever drink.

 

So we start out with some (no:  lots of) fruit:  sour cherry and prune.  With that bitter edge we get from the paradoxically named Dolcetto.  And those fruit flavors, and the attendant bitter edge, last like foreeeeeeever.  This is just one of those cases where a wine tastes exactly like itself.  Its best self.

 

Find a better Dolcetto.  I dare you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...