Jump to content
Sneakeater

The Rest of Us

Recommended Posts

Okay I confess, even at my peak of keto avoiding buns, I could eat a pack of hot dogs just dunking them in mustard or coleslaw. Not skinless of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 and raw cabbage (which I have decided is the most palatable way to eat cabbage) (with Le Boite Iris, of course).

Does cole slaw count as raw cabbage?

 

And have you ever tried a very old Marcella recipe for "smothered" cabbage, where it basically cooks very slowly basically in its own exuded liquid, for like an hour and a half?  It's pretty terrific.

 

Re: hot dogs.  Well shit, I love them too.  On the rare occasion when I make cheese fondue, I'll use cocktail franks as one of the dunkables - just great!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An all-Marcella dinner pitting Italy's two leading Medieval and Renaissance maritime republics against each other:  Genoese bluefish with potatoes (OK OK I'm sure they didn't/don't have bluefish in Genoa -- but that's what Marcella tells you to use) and Venetian smothered cabbage (see, joe tells me what to do, and I do it).

 

The two things to say about both of these dishes is that they're stupid easy to make, and they're outrageously good.  A dinner fit for a doge (of whichever republic).

 

The one question I have is, these are so TOTALLY things my wife would've cooked, and she cooked from those books so frequently, why didn't she ever make these?  The bluefish especially would have been right up her alley.

 

If I ever get to see her, I'll have to ask.

 

The Veneto wins on the wine pairing.

 

2016 Corte Gardoni Mael

 

An interesting blend of 40% Garganega (the main Soave grape) and 20% each of Trebbianello (a supporting Soave grape), Trebbiano Toscano (which you know), and Riesling (the greatest wine grape in the world).

 

So it's like a Soave (it certainly has that bitter almond finish), but, if I may say, a good deal more complex.  I'm guessing the Riesling is where the honeyed apples come from.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scallops, kale, Vaquero beans, bacon.  (Actually it was a bit more complicated than it sounds.)  I had thought I found this recipe somewhere years ago, but it appears I made it up myself.  I should be proud of it:  it's delicious.  (Indeed, I just sent it on to someone in a recipe exchange.  Hope they don't die.)

 

Now what wine is synonymous with scallops?

 

2015 Chan de Rosas Albariño "Cuvée Especial"

 

I had sort of lost track of this bottle.  And I'd be lying if I said it wasn't feeling its age (or maybe it's I, the drinker, who am feeling its age as I drink it).  Instead of vibrant acidity with integrated fruit and minerals, we get apple juice . . . with an acidic kick.

 

Oh well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two things to say about both of these dishes is that they're stupid easy to make, and they're outrageously good.  A dinner fit for a doge (of whichever republic).

 

The one question I have is, these are so TOTALLY things my wife would've cooked, and she cooked from those books so frequently, why didn't she ever make these?  The bluefish especially would have been right up her alley.

 

 

If I recall correctly (I do - I just looked), the smothered cabbage recipe wasn't a "recipe" per se; it's alluded to in the opening chapter of Marcella's Italian Cooking (her 3rd, and a book I've had since 1987?!) about technique and ingredients. You're kinda told how to do it in this chapter, entitled Good Italian Cooking.

 

Then Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking was published in 1992, and it appears in the vegetable recipes chapter, where, by the way, we're informed that the Venetian word for smothered is sofegao.

 

Maybe that's why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fried flounder (God knows I have the flour).  Leftover Venetian smothered cabbage on the side (as you'd guess, it only gets better).

 

2017 Domaine Ricard "Pierre à Feu"

 

A Touraine Sauvignon Blanc from a maker I really enjoy.  Fully organic, but not "natural".  But he just nails this grape (I've never tasted any of his reds).

 

This cuvée is on the more "exotic" side of SB, with melon/pear providing the lead-in flavor rather than say grass.  In true Ricard manner, it's perfectly balanced with the acid finish.  The guy just knows how to make wine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seared tuna steak.  On the side, the remainder of the Venetian smothered cabbage.  Not because I thought it would be such a good pairing with the tuna, but because I had to get it the fuck out of my refrigerator to make way for the ongoing barrage of Seder Shit.

 

The smothered cabbage calls for a white wine (the tuna, obvs, can go either way).  But I needed to open something that could go into the brisket I've been making today (only an hour and a quarter to go!).

 

2015 Domaine Cornu-Camus Hautes-Côtes de Beaune

 

This is better than you'd expect.  Low-level Burgundies are usually pretty disappointing:  too simple to be interesting, but too reticent to be simply good.  This doesn't do what good Burgundy does -- but it doesn't feel like a rip-off, either.  A good wine to put into a slow-cooker impersonation of a braise.  Or, for that matter, to have with a mid-week tuna steak.

 

Drink up if you have any.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the going get tough, the tough get ethnic.
 
Mahtzoh ball soup.
 
Montreal steak.  (I recently learned that Montreal Steak is extremely popular in mainstream America -- one of McCormick's very top selling spice blends is "Montreal Spice" (why is Lior of Le Boite sleeping on this?) -- but that no one knows it's Jewish, thinking instead it's some kind French Canadian dish.  Of course, I always knew it as nothing more or less than steak rubbed with Smoked Meat spices (my mix comes from Schwartz's).)  (It certainly doesn't TASTE very French Canadian.)  Topped with . . . RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMMMMMMMMPPPPPPPPSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!  (Thank you, Baldor.)
 
Because this steak was rather nice as a piece of meat, I decided to do it the favor of lightening my usually heavy hand with the Schwartz's Steak & Beef Spice.  This turned out to not be a good idea.  Ashkenazic cooking isn't subtle (and neither, for that matter, is French Canadian!).
 
Sangre de Toro beans and sautéed spinach on the side.
 
I'm very much of the you-don't-drink-wine-with-soup school.  With the steak, the absolutely PERFECT Montreal Steak pairing.
 
2011 Maison Brulées Art de L'Eau
 
You start with the notion that black cherry soda is sort of the house drink at Schwartz's.  And the wine that tastes most like black cherry soda has to be Loire Cabernet Franc.  But what if I could pour a Loire wine where the Cab Franc is blended with peppery Pineau d'Aunis and sharp fruity Gamay?  You'd think, that wine was MADE to go with Montreal Steak.  And you'd be right!
 
Now this wine clearly wasn't built to last.  But these nine years haven't done it much damage.  It perfectly hit the spot here:  black cherry and pepper, strong vein of acid to cut the steak's fat, natural-wine sour finish to make it even tangier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first batch of leftovers from the brisket.  This really brought home how much I undercooked it in the first instance.  The first time I ate it (after it had been sitting in the refrigerator overnight), I reheated it at 375 F for 90 minutes (mainly to make time for a Seder, a fish course, and a soup course).  I worried that might have been too much (if you saw the resulting brisket, you'd know why -- but it tasted fine, it just looked a little incinerated).  This time, I tried 30 minutes at 300 F -- and the brisket just wasn't cooked enough.  So I gave it another 30 minutes -- and to be honest, it was stil only almost there.  I'll have to adjust the time/temp for the next reheating -- and maybe slow-cook it for 10 rather than 8 hours next time I make it.

 

Preceded by matzoh ball soup (no wine).  Accompanied by sautéed kale.

 

I decided on a wine to complement the brisket's chocolate tones (yeah there's some La Soledad Chocolate Almendrado in there) (I wanted a chocolate with some sweetness, to balance out the coffee in this dish) (I TOLD you it got baroque).  Also, a wine with plenty of tannins, so the brisket fat at last could mate (go for it, brisket fat!).

 

2014 Domaine de Château Larroque

 

I just love this Côtes de Gascogne.  That region is no stranger to hearty dishes, so of course this wine was in its element.

 

For less than $20, you get very upfront fruit (black currant, say), tons of secondary flavors (chocolate, leather, coffee:  that kind of stuff), and a not short (albeit not really really long) finish.  It's really all you could ask for from a bottle this reasonably priced.

 

Despite its price, I don't think this 6-year-old wine is on any precipice, either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...