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I read all these threads about these fabulous dinners people have at home, with photogenic, obviously labor-intensive food, and legendary bottles.   I can't speak for anybody else on this board, bu

If I'm not enjoying wine when I'm seventy, then my nieces and nephews are going to be stuck with a shitload of wine they won't know what to do with.   Or my next wife, who by then should be almost

Whaddya mean? That's more than half the meals I serve. Tossed with great care, I might add.

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Another fridge-clearing dish:  pan-seared (and I do mean seared) striped bass (first of the season for me!) with a pan sauce comprising huge amounts of Sicilian olive oil and the oldest garlic chives in Brooklyn, garlic scapes, lemon zest, and dried Szigeti Paprika (since I've been listening to so much of its eponymous violinist lately).  Sautéed mustard greens on the side.

In the absence of any sharp Southern Italian whites that I could find, I for some reason opted for a Savoie.  Even though I'm pretty sure that hot peppers and garlic do not loom large in Savoyard cuisine.

2011 Domaine Giachino Primitif

No, the allium this wine would have liked is onion.  With runny cheese.

Anyway, this is a good wine, if not a great pairing.  It's made in the old style -- I suppose that means naturally -- and with age has become decidedly oxidated (not that there's anything wrong with that).  Appley start.  Toasted nuts -- but very light.  Lots of minerals (and, of course, acid).  You know what it's like?  It's like an aged Muscadet, but with more fruit at the front.

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The last batch of my mole poblano con pollo.  With steamed sugar snaps on the side, cuz this dish just goes with peas.

Perfect as my past pairing was -- and it really was -- I wasn't going to repeat the same pairing a third time.  I figured Malbec was another fruity, deep-flavored grape that could go with this spicy chocolate.  But I chose a natural one.

2019 Olivier Lemasson Les Vins Contés "Cheville de Fer"

A natural carbonic Loire Côt.  I want to say upfront that, while I find Jon Bonné too resistant to natural wine in general, I'm very sympathetic to his remark about carbonic maceration: "Wait — you can grow grenache, cinsault, bastardo, carignan, aleatico tempranillo or kekfrankos and have it all taste the same?  What glorious times we live in, lads."  Although since what it all tastes like is my very favorite wine -- carbonic Gamay -- maybe I shouldn't complain.

Anyway, this particular wine approaches, but skirts, that problem.  I'm not gonna say that you drink this and immediately think, "this is the same grape that produces Cahors."  But it isn't just Generic Carbonic, either.

What I'm getting from this bottle is that, just as classical period instruments performers eventually learned to play their old instruments in tune, we're moving away from the time when all carbonic wines tasted exactly the same.  There's a lot of fruit flavor here, and it's very distinctive -- even if it doesn't taste exactly like any other Malbec/Côt you've ever drunk.  Cuz it doesn't taste exactly like a Lapierre, either.

So a big explosion of cherry and very very dark berry at the outset.  This leads -- I'm not gonna lie -- to the kind of barnyardy accents at the finish that drive folks like Rich apeshit.  But here, they're underplayed (subtle cowshit).

How did this do as a pairing for the mole poblano con pollo?  Surprisingly well, actually.  The dark fruit complements the chocolate.  And then the light fizzy finish undercuts the extreme (and it really is extreme) (not that there's anything wrong with that) richness of the sauce.  But the protein here is chicken -- not beef or even pork.  It's light.  A lightish wine is nice with it.

Assuming I haven't finished all my chicken (I've totally lost control of my freezer:  am I alone here in that?), the next adventure will be Mongo's spicy chicken fry.  God knows what I'll pair with that.  (Actually, I already have a few ideas.)

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If you have some salmon and some sorrel, OF COURSE you're going to make like Pierre Troisgros. 

It's easy to see why this became the foundational dish of nouvelle cuisine.  Because it's fucking delicious.

Legend has it that Pierre was inspired to create this dish because his wife had an overabundance of sorrel in her garden one early-'60s summer.  So I'm sure he wouldn't look askance at my throwing in some spruce tips cuz they've been in my refrigerator like forever.  (He would look askance at my failure to flatten the salmon -- but I mean, come on, THAT stuff is what you go to restaurants for.)

Steamed broccoli on the side.

Has anyone ever drunk anything other than Sancerre with this dish?  Ever?  I can't believe it.

2017 Domaine Roger Sancerre "Domaine du Carrou"

A straight-down-the-middle Sancerre that tastes exactly like what it is.  So it opens with gooseberry, citrus, pear; maybe some plum to change it up.  Then a long stretch of flint, and a very sharp acid finish.

Nothing special, not at all.  But it does exactly what you want it to do.

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On 7/9/2020 at 1:18 AM, Sneakeater said:

 

2019 Olivier Lemasson Les Vins Contés "Cheville de Fer"

A natural carbonic Loire Côt.  I want to say upfront that, while I find Jon Bonné too resistant to natural wine in general, I'm very sympathetic to his remark about carbonic maceration: "Wait — you can grow grenache, cinsault, bastardo, carignan, aleatico tempranillo or kekfrankos and have it all taste the same?  What glorious times we live in, lads."  Although since what it all tastes like is my very favorite wine -- carbonic Gamay -- maybe I shouldn't complain.

 

Aren't we mostly past the days of carbonic=natural wine?  I feel like that was more of a trope ten years ago? When people where enamored with Chauvet.

(very hard to find naturalista stuff in the burbs btw - though I have discovered a place that thought it could do volume in stuff like Baudry/Bojo Gang of X/Mainstream Non-Tuscan Italian stuff and couldn't and so is selling them at about a 20% discount to what I would normally pay.  Also "good" prices on Dauvissat. I asked a guy "Are these prices normal" "Oh yeah, that stuff doesn't sell")

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Beaujolais
Yvon Métras, Fleurie Vieilles Vignes (Red Wax), 2012  $119.99 (1)
Yvon Métras, Fleurie, 2009  $129 (3)
Yvon Métras, Fleurie, 2012  $99.99 (1)
Yvon Métras, l'Ultime Fleurie, 2010  $179 (2)
Yvon Métras, Moulin-à-Vent, 2012  $109 (3)
 
Jura
Houillon-Overnoy, Arbois Pupillin, 2011  $399 (7)

Ahh. Whats the expression I'm looking for? GFY

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Everyone see the Chef's Club list they sent out? Now those prices were attractive. Lots of 2014 beaujolais....

Those Metras prices are bonkers though honestly probably not out of line with auction. That 2010 was one of my first wine-shop-in-Europe-finds that I brought back.

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