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I read all these threads about these fabulous dinners people have at home, with photogenic, obviously labor-intensive food, and legendary bottles.   I can't speak for anybody else on this board, bu

If I'm not enjoying wine when I'm seventy, then my nieces and nephews are going to be stuck with a shitload of wine they won't know what to do with.   Or my next wife, who by then should be almost

Whaddya mean? That's more than half the meals I serve. Tossed with great care, I might add.

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3 hours ago, voyager said:

Don't own one, but do have a set of flattish graters for small to large grate.    I love them in part because of the delicious memory of buying them at a very fancy charity garage sale.    The dowager at check out looked at them and cooed, "Oooooh, those are SO nice!   What do they go on?"    I met her eye and replied, "The end of your arm."  

I don't have a box grater, only the flat kind, which may be the reason my Joan Nathan latkes were, um, unsatisfactory.  My usual method results in a rosti-like latke anyway and I'm going back to it next year,  or maybe for day 8. 

I use the flat grater mainly to make egg salad, by pushing the hard-cooked egg through the square holes.  It's perfect for that use.

 

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The holy grail of a dinner where all preparation consisted either of reheating things or opening a jar.  The downside is, it's a complete retread.  But a complete retread of a dinner I loved -- whose main dish is even better several days on.

Cholent (this time I thought to reheat it in the cazuela from which I ate it).  Yerushalmi Kugel.  Pickled green beans (different from last time:  Rick's Picks really are superior products).

While staying with my thought that Merlot is really a pretty perfect pairing for cholent, I wanted something lighter than the wines I'd been drinking with this.

2019 Floral Terranes Merlot

I don't want to oversell Floral Terranes:  this isn't really excellent wine.  It's just very enjoyable (and you can't beat the backstory).

So really, it was kind of just what I was looking for tonight.

All the wine has, basically, is fruit and sour.  But tonight that was all I was looking for.

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"Protect us, dear God, from the wrath of the Hungarians." -- Henry the Fowler, Act 1 of Wagner's Lohengrin (broadcast by the Staatsoper Berlin this afternoon)

I know it must seem like my diet is some bi-polar self-hating alternation of traditional Ashkenazic cookery and pork dishes.  But the point of cooking (only) for yourself is to make what you like.

Leftover pork goulash (which I guess makes it Polish goulash, so I don't have to worry about the wrath of the Hungarians).  Getting so much better all the time.  When I finally finish it, it will probably have gotten to be so good that I'll want to kill myself.

On the side, sautéed kale, which I accidentally made almost perfectly (to my taste).

I hadn't mentioned that I put some hot peppers (which don't belong) into this goulash, mainly because I had some that were reaching the very end of any conceivable useful life they could have (joethefoodie would have thrown them out in early November).  So I chose a wine that's known for going with spicy dishes (even if its local cuisine isn't notably spicy).

2019 Luyt/Familia Ernesto Soto Pipeño "Carrizal"

The most trad Chilean wine.  Pais grapes are manually destemmed by whacking them over a characteristic Chilean device called a zeranda, and then trampled under foot and fermented in an open vat.  Luyt makes this one in conjunction with a local grower.

You don't like to use mushy words like "soul" in describing wine (or anything).  But this wine drips soul.  Terroir is more than the soil in which the grapes are grown:  it's the whole culture from which the wine springs.  This wine speaks -- no sings -- of its home in the Chilean Andes.

The berry fruit is bright.  The finish is crisp.  It slides under hot spices cunningly, just as people say it does.

This wine has a very high gulpability factor.  There's nothing profound about it.  EXCEPT that it is profound, profound in its human relatability.  This is wine for drinking, for living.  This is the kind of wine that has fueled thousands of years of human cultural development.

Cheers.

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2 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

"This is the kind of wine that has fueled thousands of years of human cultural development.

 

Let me take this opportunity to state one of things I find so awesome about wine.  (To be clear, beer has been around at least as long as wine has, so this is true for beer as well.)

Wine is not a truly natural, low-intervention, product (the way, say, grilled meat is).  Even the lowest-intervention wine requires a considerable amount of human agency.

So when you drink wine (or beer), you're drinking something that humans have been very actively crafting for millennia, going back to the very roots of civilization.  (You could say the same about bread -- which has the same elemental appeal.)  By some theories, these things are the cause of civilzation.  The way I see it, they are all fundamental to what makes us human.

I think this is why I feel this strange sense of comfort when I go to some new place where the land is covered with vineyards.  It cries out that here is benign human intervention.  Culture, in the purest sense.

God that sounds lame.

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5 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

I know it must seem like my diet is some bi-polar self-hating alternation of traditional Ashkenazic cookery and pork dishes.

Oh god.

5 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

I had some that were reaching the very end of any conceivable useful life they could have (joethefoodie would have thrown them out in early November). 

oh god.

 

4 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

By some theories, these things are the cause of civilzation.  The way I see it, they are all fundamental to what makes us human.

OHGOD.

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11 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

 

This wine has a very high gulpability factor.  There's nothing profound about it.  EXCEPT that it is profound, profound in its human relatability.  This is wine for drinking, for living.  This is the kind of wine that has fueled thousands of years of human cultural development.

Cheers.

We used to stay with a winemaker in Languedoc who  was a “best sommelier in France” in the late ‘80s.   He said that a good wine made you want to finish the glass.  Then have another.   And finally to be surprised when the bottle was empty.

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