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7 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

I got the $60 Gin Donabe from Korin after I saw that Mrs. Donabe's version cost $325.  I can now see why Korin's is so much cheaper:  there are many design features (such as anything creating an adequate seal) that are simply absent.  OTOH, I'm still not ready to spend $325 for a clay stovetop smoker.

So, smoked sablefish collar.  This unit smokes lightly; this doesn't taste like anything you'd get from Russ & Daughters (I should know:  I had some of theirs yesterday).  But it's nice. 

Most stovetop smokers aren't prefect: I have what was once the classic for indoor smoking (if you didn't turn your wok into a smoker, which people have been doing for a long time):

image.thumb.png.ce5bfeaedc2ad53d7626879f2e260ecd.png

 

Smoke leaks, it never tastes the same as smoking, say, on a Weber would. And also, we're generally smoking something that cooks in a short period of time, so not a hell of a lot of time to absorb. But you could play the same trick that's played with a wok and that is to create a better seal with aluminum foil.

Now of course you're gonna say: "what am you crazy; that's not what I bought the gin for!" I understand!

(That shit from R & D is probably smoking for a day. In a giant room specifically meant for smoking, that's been smoking stuff for decades).

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58 minutes ago, joethefoodie said:

(That shit from R & D is probably smoking for a day. In a giant room specifically meant for smoking, that's been smoking stuff for decades).

Many years ago, I worked on a promotional video for Acme Smoked Fish. Can confirm.

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You may well have. That was one of my favorite shoots, not least because the Acme folks gave everyone in the crew about 5lbs of smoked fish to take home. Then we got back to the studio and everyone yelled at us because we (and the equipment) smelled like fish.

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Volaille Demi-Deuil.

I pretty much followed the recipe in the La Mère Brazier book.  Not just because she's the person with whom this dish is primarily associated (although it apparently was actually originated by another Lyonnaise chef/restaurateur, La Mère Fillioux) (in my experience one mère is plenty).  But also because her recipe is simpler than the other recipes for this dish you see floating around.  (I had avoided cooking from the La Mère Brazier book because I feared it would be too labor-intensive.  I guess I figured that she had her battalions of terrified teenagers to do her gruntwork -- Paul Bocuse, Bernard Pacaud, whomever -- whereas I have only myself.  Now that I know, I have to cook a lot more from this book.)  Most of those other recipes for this dish purport to "ramp up" the flavors, and it did seem a little worrisome to me how few herbs (like none) and seasonings and other flavoring elements there were in La Mère's recipe.  But I guess her point is that if you have truffles, what else do you need?

I did, however, replace the plums-in-vinegar that are supposed to be among the accompaniments to the poached chicken with PA Dutch pickled beets.  Cuz I had pickled beets and couldn't find any plums-in-vinegar.  (You might argue that La Mère undoubtedly made her own.  But I'm sure she pickled them in season, not in the middle of winter when she couldn't get them at all and mine would come from godknowswhere.)

When you have Lyonnaise food, you immediately think of Beaujolais (not that it takes a lot to get me thinking of Beaujolais) (amazing [NOT] how my very favorite kind of food goes with my very favorite kind of wine).  Brazier recommends a Beaujolais Nouveau with this dish.  But Jesus Christ, La Mère, we want to be drinking wine with this.

2014 Gilles Gelin Fleurie

My stock of my beloved 2014 Beaujolais is apparently self-replenishing.

This bottle is by Gilles Gelin, a producer with whom I'm unfamiliar (except that I apparently bought some of his wine at some point) (I loved the 2014 Beaujolais so much that I pretty much picked up anything anyone suggested was good).

This is a classic Beaujolais from this classic vintage -- and a classic Fleurie as well.  Nice nose, racy fruit:  pleasure in a bottle (and then in a glass) (and then in your mouth).  Not special in any way:  just good.

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7 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

Not just because she's the person with whom this dish is primarily associated (although it apparently was actually originated by another Lyonnaise chef/restaurateur, La Mère Fillioux) (in my experience one mère is plenty).  But also because her recipe is simpler than the other recipes for this dish you see floating around.

She roiled over in her grave when I did this...

1208142629_Chickenwithtruffletrufflemash02-17.thumb.jpeg.d77f16255792d86bc57e4f138454ba16.jpeg

Yet it was indeed simple.  And no herbs were harmed (except the garnish).

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9 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

and it did seem a little worrisome to me how few herbs (like none) and seasonings and other flavoring elements there were in the La Mère's recipe.  But I guess her point is that if you have truffles, what else do you need?

Interesting. I think this might be the central difference between US and European old world/new world approaches to cooking. Old world adds one thing, not 20, but then goes all in. The nuances come from the base notes, not the top notes if that makes sense. Exception would be something like fines herbes but the point there is at that time of the year you have too much of all of it growing all at once. 

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8 minutes ago, Behemoth said:

Interesting. I think this might be the central difference between US and European old world/new world approaches to cooking. Old world adds one thing, not 20, but then goes all in. The nuances come from the base notes, not the top notes if that makes sense. Exception would be something like fines herbes but the point there is at that time of the year you have too much of all of it growing all at once. 

then again, completely untrue of Indian and Thai food. 

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