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Of course, David categorizes this (like its sibling lamb breast dish) as an appetizer.

I can't imagine what life in Chez David -- or Ste. Ménéhould for that matter -- must have been like.

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I read all these threads about these fabulous dinners people have at home, with photogenic, obviously labor-intensive food, and legendary bottles.   I can't speak for anybody else on this board, bu

If I'm not enjoying wine when I'm seventy, then my nieces and nephews are going to be stuck with a shitload of wine they won't know what to do with.   Or my next wife, who by then should be almost

Whaddya mean? That's more than half the meals I serve. Tossed with great care, I might add.

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I thought that after last night's dinner -- it's not that it was heavy, let's be honest:  it was fatty -- I wouldn't be very hungry tonight.  So I planned something lightish.  But, as it turned out, those globules of breaded pig fat only served to whet my appetite.  (The Tabliers de Sapeur are coming soon.)  So I made myself a BIG portion of the lightish dish I'd planned for tonight.

Busiate Tumminia with bottled Hatch chili pesto (and lots of pecorino romano on top).  Sautéed pea shoots on the side (I should have put some pecorino on them as well, I now realize).

That pesto was going to get a Sauvignon Blanc.

2017 Domaine du Carrou (Dominique Roger) Sancerre "Chêne Marchand"

After I transferred this bottle from the storage unit to the fridge to chill, I began to fear I'd made a mistake.  This is Roger's senior Sancerre cuvée, and I feared it would be too suave and unctuous for a bowl of pasta with a chili that, while it doesn't bust the Scoville chart, is still very forthrightly a chili pepper, if you know what I mean.  (Hatch chilis are THE SHIT!) (Even bottled ones.)

But maybe the interaction with the chili roughed this wine up.  It had an edge -- or tasted like it did -- that I don't usually notice with this cuvée.

Pretty good pairing as it turned out, if I may say.

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7 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

Sautéed pea shoots on the side

What?!?!  - You ran out of cabbage???????

7 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

with bottled Hatch chili pesto

 

7 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

Hatch chilis are THE SHIT!

Tell me a little about this - green or red (people make "pesto" out of so many things)? (I'm guessing green).

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7 hours ago, joethefoodie said:

What?!?!  - You ran out of cabbage???????

Had to take a break.   Good thing cabbage lasts forever.  (It will reappear tomorrow night.)

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7 hours ago, joethefoodie said:

Tell me a little about this - green or red (people make "pesto" out of so many things)? (I'm guessing green).

Green.

I will tell you that I am positive to a moral certainty that you could make something better.

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Bacalhau a Gomes de Sa.

Perhaps because this dish looks something like slop in the best of circumstances, the versions I make, unusually for my cooking, actually look like food.

The Portuguese insist on drinking red wine with this.  My every instinct rebels, but who am I to disagree with them?  I figured out what seemed a perfect pairing.

2005 Arenæ Ramisco Colares

Located along a stretch of shoreline between Lisbon and Sintra, Colares is the world's smallest wine region.  And because of the pressures of waterfront development, it's getting smaller.

This seemed like an excellent pairing because Colares's red wines are neither very fruity nor very alcoholic, but are decidedly acidic (you want that with fish).  And they have some salinity (I know it's bullshit to think that wines will be saline if they're grown and vinified near the ocean -- but this is saline nonetheless) (and so is Sherry, so bite me).

The only minus here is that this wine is actually a bit young.  Winemaking in Colares never "modernized", and their wines are meant to be drunk with a lot of age on them, the way Barolos used to be.

So while this wasn't in any way bad (or even mediocre), the flavors hadn't yet reached total integration:  there's still a little roughness here in the transitions.  Very little bit of black cherry fruit at the start.  Then, a very long stretch of herbs with some charcoal and tobacco.  The sea salt comes at the end.  But you can taste the seams between them.

So, good with Bacalhau a Gomes de Sa, and good tonight.  But I'm not touching my other bottle of this for a while.

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3 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

MY BUTCHER DOESN'T CARRY TRIPE

My butcher carries anything you want but sometimes quantities are out of sight.   Like 10 lbs of lamb tongue is a handful of dinner parties.

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2 hours ago, Anthony Bonner said:

lmk if someone finds suet anywhere.

Depends on your definition*.    I asked my butcher for suet for pastry, and he simply pulled a standing rib from the case and carved off a half inch thick slab.    I keep it in the freezer and grate off quantities when I need it.    Makes super dumplings.

* "imk" suet can be either clean, raw beef fat that is clear of veining and flesh, or beef fat that has been rendered.  I consider the latter tallow.  

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