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I read all these threads about these fabulous dinners people have at home, with photogenic, obviously labor-intensive food, and legendary bottles.   I can't speak for anybody else on this board, bu

If I'm not enjoying wine when I'm seventy, then my nieces and nephews are going to be stuck with a shitload of wine they won't know what to do with.   Or my next wife, who by then should be almost

Whaddya mean? That's more than half the meals I serve. Tossed with great care, I might add.

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So now, what with various engagements coming up in this New Post-Quarantine World, this will be the last home-cooked meal I'm going to have this week.

And already I'm regretting it, missing my own cooking (and, duh, my wine cellar).

THIS is something new.

 

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1 minute ago, voyager said:

The real beginning of the end is when you look at that $48 restaurant plate and think/realize, "I could do this better at home."

Oh yes.

That kind of happened to me pre-COVID with respect to celebration meals. Realizing I could go to a restaurant for something like my birthday and pay hundreds of dollars, or I could eat as much foie gras, sea urchin and cheese as I wanted at home for a fraction of the price. And drink old wine too.

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We kinda did the same with truffles and caviar. And wine. But let's not kid ourselves in that we're buying stuff that is easily prepped and in some cases goes onto a plate and that's it.  There aren't 30 steps to get to the finished dish.

2 cases from Chambers St. just got delivered, include about 8 or 10 bottles of Beauj. And lots of summery whites. I don't think a single bottle was over $30, most under $25!

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In 1976, when Marcella's classic was published, a friend and I met once a week to meticulously recreate a recipe from her book.    Not haute cuisine, but damned good plates.    She had never cooked beyond simple meats and veg, and her family was now ecstatic.    We did this for maybe a year, then she said she didn't want to do it anymore.    Previously, they had frequently dined out, but her husband was now balking, saying that he was eating better at home.

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5 hours ago, joethefoodie said:

We kinda did the same with truffles and caviar. And wine. But let's not kid ourselves in that we're buying stuff that is easily prepped and in some cases goes onto a plate and that's it.  There aren't 30 steps to get to the finished dish.

 

That's true, but sometimes those 30 steps lead to chewy duck or cold vegetables.

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My show tonight got called on account of rain.  So my plan to grab dinner at a much-loved (by me, at least) spot near the venue got scuttled.  Which meant that I could eat the next-to-the-last portion of my Matambre Argentino, with the last portions of my Ensalada Rusa and, I am happy to say, leftover Chinese restaurant water spinach with preserved tofu.  (My Famous Splinky-Inspired Housemade Chimichurri is, of course, everlasting.)

I was not at all unhappy about this.  I love my Matambre.   I'll bet I'm the best Argentine cook on my floor -- if not in my whole building.

I was going to default to a knee-jerk Argentine Malbec, cuz that really is all any Argentine would ever drink with a Matambre.  But as I was tooling around for a bottle of Malbec, I came upon an appealing alternative.

2011 Proprietà Sperino Uvaggio

A wine that loves braised or roasted beef.

This is an Alto Piemonte, a mountain wine that is considerably lighter and more tense than a Barolo.  It isn't pure Nebbiolo:  there are several weird Alto Piemonte grapes blended in.

I don't think I've ever had a bottle of this this old -- but there's nothing wrong with it.  Indeed, a decade might be about right.

There's a reason this wine is a house favorite here at Chez Sneak (cuz I like it, duh).  It tastes of Nebbiolo -- but it's a lot livelier than something from Langhe.  I don't prefer it to Langhe Nebbiolos.  But as a weeknight quaff, it's just incredibly appealing.

And very good with a cold roasted beef dish.

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Thinking about it (as I finish this wonderful bottle):  I always think of Nebbiolo as being kind of a cross between Burgundy and Bordeaux.  (Which is why I love it so.)  These Lessona wines take the Burgundy side and run with it.

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I'm rather late to the party but had a Nerello Mascalese for the first time. Taut and mineral -- avoids everything I dislike about Nero d'Avola. I always avoided Sicilian wines for this reason, but tried this one on recommendation of the owner at Meteo, who exactly remembers my taste even though we're there at most twice a year. 
 

it was the 2010 version of this one. Even after 10 years the cherry was really prominent. 

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