Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 7.5k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I read all these threads about these fabulous dinners people have at home, with photogenic, obviously labor-intensive food, and legendary bottles.   I can't speak for anybody else on this board, bu

If I'm not enjoying wine when I'm seventy, then my nieces and nephews are going to be stuck with a shitload of wine they won't know what to do with.   Or my next wife, who by then should be almost

Whaddya mean? That's more than half the meals I serve. Tossed with great care, I might add.

Posted Images

You need to rest the meat a little no matter what, to set it before cutting.

 

But I need a little cooking after burning a crust on. I guess the optimal thing to do is pop the steak in the oven for a short while at that point -- but I don't have a working oven. (Hey it might fit in my toaster-oven!)

 

Maybe keep cooking in the skillet on lower heat?

Ya, while spooning the butter/juices over top (you can add other flavorings -- garlic, herbs, etc -- to the pan here too).

Link to post
Share on other sites

With the last of my leftover smoked pork shank and RG Flor de Junio "Silvia" Beans -- this time served over bucatini -- braised spinach on the side.

 

2004 Paixar

 

There's a reason envy is one of the seven deadly sins. I'm not saying that recent posts in this thread drove me to open a bottle of The Most Expensive Bierzo I've Ever Bought. But I'm not saying they didn't.

 

The joke turned out to be on me. This is an International Bierzo. Smooth. Suave. There's a hint of astringency -- but only a hint. What there isn't a hint of is funk. This goes down like a Merlot.

 

This dish needed some funk. But, nevertheless, the Big Fruit this wine displayed was welcome. And, even if it was rather restrained, there was still some acid to cut the fat with which this dish was imbued.

 

It's not surprising. I prefer less pretentious Bierzos. I prefer them A Lot. But (and this is a funny thing to say about a wine that, if bought today, would probably cost north of $80) this was good enough.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

balex posted his '89 Palmer, so I wanted to play as well!

 

chantrelle's on sale at costco + truffle season warrants reaching into cellar depths!

Where are you buying truffles in Toronto?

 

 

I have a contact who gets them in and sells privately - if you are interested I can forward you her details.

 

Costco actually has some items that would go well with a Margaux, the Chantrelles for one (when BC decides to share...), and they have this award winning red wine brined cheese (the name eludes me) which is quite good. If only they stocked Foie, Truffles and Porcini's we would be set.

Link to post
Share on other sites

balex posted his '89 Palmer, so I wanted to play as well!

 

chantrelle's on sale at costco + truffle season warrants reaching into cellar depths!

 

 

Indeed -- time to bust out the good stuff. Anyway this thread seems to have drifted into being the general wine thread from being the nontrophy wine thread.

 

Hearing Isola e Olena reminded me that I have some 2004 Cepparello that might be approachable now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, 1980 Huet Vouvray Le Haut Lieu vin de glace. From maybe the worst vintage of the last 60 years. I don't think the sun appeared during the whole summer. They left the grapes on the vines, hoping for a bit more maturity, but when they had a frost, they picked and pressed as an eiswein. But despite that extra concentration, they wound up with a ca. 12% abv sec. And when I say "sec," I ain't kidding. 30 years on, there is still some serious malic acidity in this, and some not-totally-ripe phenolics. But it has interesting aromas, interesting textures, and is a crazy one-off.

 

With the changes in Western European climate, the predictions are that they may never see a vintage like this one again. Not that they probably wish to.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, 1980 Huet Vouvray Le Haut Lieu vin de glace. From maybe the worst vintage of the last 60 years. I don't think the sun appeared during the whole summer. They left the grapes on the vines, hoping for a bit more maturity, but when they had a frost, they picked and pressed as an eiswein. But despite that extra concentration, they wound up with a ca. 12% abv sec. And when I say "sec," I ain't kidding. 30 years on, there is still some serious malic acidity in this, and some not-totally-ripe phenolics. But it has interesting aromas, interesting textures, and is a crazy one-off.

 

With the changes in Western European climate, the predictions are that they may never see a vintage like this one again. Not that they probably wish to.

 

for some reason i love hearing about crazy one-offs like that

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...