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Wilfrid1

British (and Irish) Delicacies

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Spam, of course, is universal, but my mention of it on another thread seemed to turn delicate stomachs.

 

spam.jpg

 

Although it originated in the States, Spam - or spiced ham to give the full yummy name - became very popular in the UK, probably (although I haven't confirmed it) during time of food shortages during and following the Second World War. Eaten as the main ingredient of a salad (i.e. sliced cucumber, pickled beetroot, lettuce and tomato, with Heinz Salad Cream), as a sandwich filler, or dipped in batter and deep fried. The latter is a Spam fritter, and they were a weekly item on the school lunch menu growing up. With Heinz Baked Beans, I think.

 

Here's another quaint British snack, the gala pie. Essentially, this is a pie with the same crust and spiced pork filling as the traditional pork pie, but made with the addition of eggs. The shape is rectangular to display the eggs to proper effect when sliced.

 

gala-pie-sm.jpg

 

More tasty treats?

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My London-based business partner sends me care packages of Walker's Chips. I just finished a box that included Chili Chocolate, Hoisin Duck, Cajun Squirrel, Onion Bhanji, Fish & Chips, and some Breakfast blend. I couldn't be happier.

 

When I stayed near Harrods last year, nothing made me happier than the fact that I could go every morning and get some form of meat en croute for breakfast. I love 'em!

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Haggis. A sort of superior meatloaf, made with interesting parts of the sheep and helped out with oatmeal rather than breadcrumbs. Should be good and peppery.

 

haggis.jpg

 

Oddly, I've seen "vegetarian" haggis in New York from time to time (which I suppose is a sort of lentil loaf or something), but not the real thing. Traditional accompaniments above - mashed swedes and turnips.

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Spam haiku:

SPAM glistens pinkly;

Cat taps it with wary paw

To see if it's dead.

 

 

Outdoor church potluck.

SPAM casserole steams in sun.

Flies choose the tuna.

 

 

Split the SPAM atom

Enormous pink mushroom cloud

World covered in pork

 

 

Born in World War Two.

Hogs marching off to battle.

Dressed in tin armor

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My London-based business partner sends me care packages of Walker's Chips. I just finished a box that included Chili Chocolate, Hoisin Duck, Cajun Squirrel, Onion Bhanji, Fish & Chips, and some Breakfast blend. I couldn't be happier.

 

Yes, surely the best of the mass market crisps (not chips), although doubtless the stores are now full of "craft" brands. I grew up with none of those flavors, though.

 

walkers-400px.jpg

 

When I stayed near Harrods last year, nothing made me happier than the fact that I could go every morning and get some form of meat en croute for breakfast. I love 'em!

 

Just say pie, please. ;)

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Toad in the hole is thought typically British, but I suspect it has earned its reputation through its name. Did anyone eat this stuff regularly? I remember it as an occasional school lunch dish. Basically, ordinary pork sausages in a batter - much the same kind of batter you might use for savory pancakes.

 

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More commonly served without the sausages, it's called Yorkshire Pudding, and is a traditional side dish for roast beef. Usually eaten with the gravy from the beef, although I have heard of people spreading jam (jelly) on it. Neither of these dishes are favorites of mine.

 

yorkie.jpg

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Just say pie, please. ;)

 

 

Well *you* would have understood that, but everyone else might have thought I was eating pie... :ph43r:

 

cherry-pie.jpg

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Googling faggots is an adventure.

 

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Regional diversity. I never saw these in fish 'n' chip shops in the South East (where saveloys, saveloys in batter, spam fritters and even burgers in batter were meat options); but they were popular in west country fish 'n' chip shops. Never did see a battered faggot though (and I am not going to google it).

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Traditional accompaniments above - mashed swedes and turnips.

Sassenach. Should be mashed neeps (Brassica napobrassica, i.e., swede or rutabaga to the septics) and mashed tatties. I can't recall ever seeeing a real turnip (Brassica rapa rapa) in Scotland.

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Toad in the hole is thought typically British, but I suspect it has earned its reputation through its name. Did anyone eat this stuff regularly? I remember it as an occasional school lunch dish.

A regular on our school lunch rotation.

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