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Wilfrid1

British (and Irish) Delicacies

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Lobscouse. (Actually not very interesting at all -- beef stew.)

 

But the derivation of "scouser" as a slang term for denizens of Liverpool. It must have been popular there - they were always eating it on Brookside.

 

Interesting. Surely must be related to Labskaus, a Hamburg speciality which for some remarkable reason never got popular outside of Hamburg.

There was a woman on eG who wrote this book: Lobscouse and Spotted Dog. I can't remember her username now. I bought it and it looked pretty interesting, but it seems to have gotten lost in the great book fiasco when I moved.

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There was a woman on eG who wrote this book: Lobscouse and Spotted Dog. I can't remember her username now. I bought it and it looked pretty interesting, but it seems to have gotten lost in the great book fiasco when I moved.

balmagowry

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There was a woman on eG who wrote this book: Lobscouse and Spotted Dog. I can't remember her username now. I bought it and it looked pretty interesting, but it seems to have gotten lost in the great book fiasco when I moved.

balmagowry

That's it -- thanks!

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Where the hell did this "lets take the pee out of funny Brit food" thread come from?

 

Whoa, it was started by a Brit. I got the idea when some faintheart from Brooklyn brought up Wimpy's benders on another thread. I actually enjoy, or have enjoyed, everything I've posted - except I never liked Yorkshire pud much.

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Interesting. Surely must be related to Labskaus, a Hamburg speciality which for some remarkable reason never got popular outside of Hamburg.

 

Definitely from labskaus, although I had thought that was Scandinavian. Let me go and look it up...

 

...okay, here it is, yes Hamburg they make it with dish and call it fischlabskaus; maybe they make a meat version too. I was thinking of the Danish labskova. According to Elisabeth Luard, whence this erudition, the common thread is a way of using up ship store leftovers (Liverpool like Hamburg being a major port historically, and thus full of hungry sailors).

 

She also points out that if made with cabbage instead of meat (or fish) it's essentially the same as bubble and squeak. (Unknown sauce in this picture.)

 

2853803950_262004a0e3.jpg

 

From an American perspective, these are forms of "hash."

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Who's Stephen Hawkins?

Not British. He's INTERNATIONAL! The International Doctor of Outer Space!

 

5znEizruC5E

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There was a woman on eG who wrote this book: Lobscouse and Spotted Dog. I can't remember her username now. I bought it and it looked pretty interesting, but it seems to have gotten lost in the great book fiasco when I moved.

balmagowry

That's it -- thanks!

 

She and I had a fairly exhaustive email exchange for a while. Then she got fed up with the eG politics and I never heard from her again. Pity, she was fun!

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Interesting. Surely must be related to Labskaus, a Hamburg speciality which for some remarkable reason never got popular outside of Hamburg.

 

Definitely from labskaus, although I had thought that was Scandinavian. Let me go and look it up...

 

...okay, here it is, yes Hamburg they make it with dish and call it fischlabskaus; maybe they make a meat version too. I was thinking of the Danish labskova. According to Elisabeth Luard, whence this erudition, the common thread is a way of using up ship store leftovers (Liverpool like Hamburg being a major port historically, and thus full of hungry sailors).

 

She also points out that if made with cabbage instead of meat (or fish) it's essentially the same as bubble and squeak. (Unknown sauce in this picture.)

 

2853803950_262004a0e3.jpg

 

From an American perspective, these are forms of "hash."

 

The Catalans eat it too - trinxat. Originally made with pork, but now - and to my experience - much more likely to be cabbage.

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Interesting. Surely must be related to Labskaus, a Hamburg speciality which for some remarkable reason never got popular outside of Hamburg.

 

Definitely from labskaus, although I had thought that was Scandinavian. Let me go and look it up...

 

...okay, here it is, yes Hamburg they make it with dish and call it fischlabskaus; maybe they make a meat version too. I was thinking of the Danish labskova. According to Elisabeth Luard, whence this erudition, the common thread is a way of using up ship store leftovers (Liverpool like Hamburg being a major port historically, and thus full of hungry sailors).

 

She also points out that if made with cabbage instead of meat (or fish) it's essentially the same as bubble and squeak. (Unknown sauce in this picture.)

 

2853803950_262004a0e3.jpg

 

From an American perspective, these are forms of "hash."

Now I'm confused. Grigson and Davidson (who suspects a Baltic origin) describe lobscouse as a stew (Grigson says stew/soup).

 

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The Catalans eat it too - trinxat. Originally made with pork, but now - and to my experience - much more likely to be cabbage.

 

Interesting. I haven't seen that.

 

Now I'm confused. Grigson and Davidson (who suspects a Baltic origin) describe lobscouse as a stew (Grigson says stew/soup).

 

Luard definitely has it as a kind of hash. You cook diced potatoes and fish or meat, with onions and a few other flavorings, in a pan, and she describes "turning it out" of the pan when it's done.

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I have to admit I unfairly maligned Labskaus. I was taken to a neat place in Hamburg this weekend that takes the (ahem) NBC approach to Northern dishes, and decided if I was ever going to try it, this was my chance. It's not bad -- basically corned beef hash made with beets as well as potatoes. Fried egg on top, and served with pickled beets, gherkins and herring on the side. The portion was rather large and once you're done with the egg & pickles it gets a bit boring, but still, It was really quite good. If anyone is planning to be in Hamburg, this is a good place to check out: Oberhafen Kantine

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asically corned beef hash made with beets as well as potatoes.

 

This is known as red flannel hash in the U.S.

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