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White Truffle Possibilities


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Well, I have to say that a lot of it is aromatics. The taste of white truffles is, well, dependent in part of the slicing/presentation format.

 

I suppose part of it is the relative scarcity of them. If cherries were equally difficult to get, cherries might be that expensive too. ;)

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Like every year, I continue in my pursuit of reasonably priced (relatively) and delicious all-white-truffle menus. I've sent an e-mail to ADNY asking about this, and will visit the $50/person place

I went into Buon Italia last winter to get some rice, and the whole back of the store reeked of truffles. I floated back on the aroma to discover a couple of people unpacking what was essentially a s

The pierogies are nuxbait, right?

Wilfrid -- What do you get (apart from aromatics) from white truffles?

 

Here's info from Tribeca Grill (I am not suggesting people go to this event, as I don't think the restaurant is strong... but the white wine selection is somewhat tempting with the B du Martray and Ramonet).

 

White Truffle Dinner at Tribeca Grill

 

White Truffle Scented Lobster Salad

Truffled Haricots Verts

 

White Burgundy

Corton Charlemagne, Bonneau du Martray 1992

Meursault, Coche Dury 1997

Chablis 'Valmur', Raveneau 2000

Batard Montrachet, Domaine Ramonet 2000

 

White Truffle Risotto

Braised Oxtail and Pancetta

 

Bonnes Mares, Roumier 1995

Musigny, Frederick Mugnier 1996

Echézeaux, Grivot 1999

 

White Truffle Crusted Veal Tenderloin

Mushroom and Foie Gras Duxelle

 

Elio Altare 'Arborina' 1998

Domenico Clerico 'Pajana' 1997

Luciano Sandrone 'Cannubi Boschis' 1996

 

Chaource

Caramelized Figs, Asian Pears and White Truffle Brioche

 

Giacomo Borgogno 'Riserva' 1961

 

Tartufo

 

Monday, November 21st, 2005. 6:30 p.m. $595 per person, all inclusive.

 

Tribeca Grill, 375 Greenwich Street, NYC, 10013

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Wilfrid -- What do you get (apart from aromatics) from white truffles?

 

Here's info from Tribeca Grill (I am not suggesting people go to this event, as I don't think the restaurant is strong... but the white wine selection is somewhat tempting with the B du Martray and Ramonet). 

 

White Truffle Dinner at Tribeca Grill

 

White Truffle Scented Lobster Salad

Truffled Haricots Verts

 

White Burgundy

Corton Charlemagne, Bonneau du Martray 1992

Meursault, Coche Dury 1997

Chablis 'Valmur', Raveneau 2000

Batard Montrachet, Domaine Ramonet 2000

 

White Truffle Risotto

Braised Oxtail and Pancetta

 

Bonnes Mares, Roumier 1995

Musigny, Frederick Mugnier 1996

Echézeaux, Grivot 1999

 

White Truffle Crusted Veal Tenderloin

Mushroom and Foie Gras Duxelle

 

Elio Altare 'Arborina' 1998

Domenico Clerico 'Pajana' 1997

Luciano Sandrone 'Cannubi Boschis' 1996

 

Chaource

Caramelized Figs, Asian Pears and White Truffle Brioche

 

Giacomo Borgogno 'Riserva' 1961

 

Tartufo

 

Monday, November 21st, 2005.  6:30 p.m.  $595 per person, all inclusive.

 

Tribeca Grill, 375 Greenwich Street, NYC, 10013

Hmmm..., why drink from the 90 & 00's when you can drink from the 70's & 1800's? Anyway, found this on EG and it looks like a good line-up. Great year for truffles!!!!!

 

 

"For anyone interested, there will be a White Truffle dinner at Cru Retaurant in Manhattan on December 6th of this year. The menu is as follows:

 

Amuse Bouche

Sliced Hamachi Collar with Marinated Fennel, Quince and Beets Sponge

Crème Fraiche-Truffle Yolk Dressing

CRU

Krug ‘Grande Cuvée’

 

 

First Course

Vanishing White Truffle Noodles

Cauliflower, Custard Apple and Cepes

Cornelius Gallagher – Oceana

Meursault 1er Cru ‘Charmes’ Domaine Comtes Lafon 1997

 

 

Fish Course

Seared Nantucket Bay Scallops

with "Crema di Riso", Whipped with Parmigiano and Butter "Vacca Rossa".

Dodo Nicotra – Felidia

Hermitage Blanc J.L. Chave 1994

 

 

Pasta Course

Homemade Foie Gras-Tapioca Ravioli with a Sunchoke Broth

Tony Esnault – Alain Ducasse NY

Barolo Bartolo Mascarello 1971

 

 

Fowl Course

Gently Cooked Four Story Hill Guinea Hen

Corona Bean Passatina, Caramelised Broccoli and Whipped Red Kuri Squash

Hazelnut Fonduta

Shea Gallante – CRU

Barbaresco Riserva ‘Santo Stefano’ Bruno Giacosa 1982

 

 

Meat Course

Everything from a Hampshire Lamb

North Carolina Farro, Bianca Riccia and Herbs Salad

Dan Barber – Blue Hill / BH Stone Barns

Barolo Riserva ‘Monfortino’ Giacomo Conterno 1978

 

 

Pre Dessert

Red Grapefruit Soup with Greek Yogurt Sorbet

CRU

 

 

Vanilla Dessert

Tahitian Vanilla & Spice Pudding Cake

Truffled Sabayon and Golden Barley Crunch

Tiffany MacIssac – CRU

Chateau d’Yquem 1983

 

 

Chocolate Dessert

Austrian Pumpkinseed-Chocolate Souffle

with Caramel and Madeira-Black Truffle Ice Cream

Alex Grunert – Bouley

Madeira Boal 1863 Barbeito"

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Well, I'd have to say that, for my tastes, the Tribeca Grill line-up seems more promising wine-wise. Of course, food-wise, Cru's menu is a lot better, and with Dan and some other chefs. ;)

 

Even though I like the Cru offering of Mersault Charmes, Lafon quite a bit. ;)

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As with my recent Perigee dinner, at which I was offered more than one wine pairing with a number of courses, these will presumably not be full pours.

 

In answer to Cabby's earlier question, I am afraid I find the term 'aromatics' confusing in this context. Other than the basic tastes of sweet, salt, sour, bitter and umame, all flavors are aromatic, in the sense that they are recognized by receptors in the olfactory bulb up behind your nose. For this to be possible, the flavors must volatilise (in rough terms, the food/beverage must give off gas while it is in your mouth). Holding wine in your mouth before swallowing it, for example, afford longer for the off-gassing to take place, and allows more delivery of flavor notes to the olfactory region.

 

Which is just another way of saying that the key distinctive flavor notes of all food and beverages are 'aromatics'. Which is why I don't get the question about the truffles.

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The last two posts don't help me much. If there is no olfactory function, the only tastes which can be distinguished are sweet, sour, salt, bitter and umami. Finer distinctions are made possible only by olfaction. Someone with no olfactory function must be in the position of someone with a very, very severe headcold - most unfortunate.

 

Apart from "the smell", any wine - for example - offers only sourness (or is it bitterness, I can't remember): no fruit, no secondary or tertiary flavors. So I don't understand "apart from smell" in this context.

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Alto offers white truffle with any dish at a supplement of $75. For two people, adding white truffles to just one dish, amounts to more than the price of a seven course tasting ($115). Mm, no I don't think so.

 

Edit: I see this was noted earlier in the thread - sorry.

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The last two posts don't help me much. If there is no olfactory function, the only tastes which can be distinguished are sweet, sour, salt, bitter and umami. Finer distinctions are made possible only by olfaction. Someone with no olfactory function must be in the position of someone with a very, very severe headcold - most unfortunate.

 

Apart from "the smell", any wine - for example - offers only sourness (or is it bitterness, I can't remember): no fruit, no secondary or tertiary flavors. So I don't understand "apart from smell" in this context.

I've always had a hard time describing truffles to my non truffle-obsessed friends. To me it seems there is a 'middle place' between tasting and smelling that happens up between the roof of the mouth and the nasal passages, and that's where the truffle thing happens. This is just my initial attempt at describing ... I'd be happy to do more research in order to refine it. I think huitlacoche has the same effect, although that's more umami on the tongue.

 

I'm recently back from Italy where I had the fabulous experience of saying "You know, I think I've had enough truffles today." There was truffled everything -- from pecorino to sausages, to mounds of egg tagliatele with very thin shavings on top. One way I want to try them is in an egg infusion -- read somewhere that if you leave your truffles in a bowl with eggs overnight, the essence will permeate the shells, leaving a subtle but unmistakable truffle undertone when you go to scramble them. Again, I'd be happy to research. PM me if you have a couple of truffles lying around. ;)

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I've always had a hard time describing truffles to my non truffle-obsessed friends. To me it seems there is a 'middle place' between tasting and smelling that happens up between the roof of the mouth and the nasal passages, and that's where the truffle thing happens.

Yes, that's the olfactory bulb, the space behind your soft palate which you can almost reach with the tip of your tongue (don't choke). It's full of sensitive chemical receptors. But that's where we make all our fine distinctions of flavor - not just with truffles, but with all food and wine.

 

I wonder if there's anything special about truffles except (a) we really, really like the smell, and (b) they are not very strongly bitter, sour, etc.

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