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The Breslin


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  • 1 month later...
Sticky toffee pudding, something else I'd never had before, wasn't nearly what I'd hoped.

 

Just had sticky toffee pudding at Redhead. Whatever they served me at Breslin really sucked.

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  • 1 month later...

New spring menu.

 

No more stuffed pig foot. No more braised pork belly.

 

Instead, The Breslin has moved on to beef.

 

The two new major meat main dishes are tongue and oxtail in broth, and a ribeye for two.

 

The tongue and oxtail is very good. There are also some deep-fried tempuraish vegetables in the broth along with the meat. The tongue is grilled rather than boiled. I don't have to tell you what this taste likes. You know what it tastes like. If you like this sort of thing, you'll like it: it is what it is.

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  • 5 months later...

Went to the Breslin for the first time in a while. Unfortunately my date was sort of freaking out at all the fat in the food on the menu, which kind of cast a pall on the meal. But the main point I want to make is that what has been the most glaring flaw of the menu has not been corrected.

 

My problem with the Breslin has always been that if you don't want to share an entree, there are (paradoxically) few main dish options for meateaters. And so, last night, there was NO WAY IN HELL that my dining companion was going to ingest their fried stuffed pig's foot. Aside from the lamburger (which to me is NOT DINNER), the other meat options seemed to be a rib eye and lamb ribs. I'd had lamb ribs twice in the last few days, so I opted for the steak. Although the menu doesn't show it, however, the steak also is for sharing. (My dining companion was insisting on the artic char for herself, the wimp.) So . . . another plate of lamb ribs.

 

I'm sorry to say that the ribs were (a) overcooked and (b) overspiced. So not only were they leathery, but they were so peppery that they were hard to eat. I've admired the cooking here for featuring what I call "flavor times three", but this was too much.

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You may even consider the menu limited - if the occasion isn't right for the pig's foot (for two) or pork belly (for two), the meat eater is left with the beef shin - not recommended - the vinegared spring chicken or a lamb burger.

 

The Pig, back when it opened. Not that it isn't worth pointing out that it's still the case.

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Me, from even earlier than the Pig:

 

My only real complaint about The Breslin is that menu is too limited. There are only five or six main dishes. (And two of them -- pork belly and stuffed pig's foot -- are served only for two.) So, oddly in this meatcentric restaurant, meat main dish choices for one (not just solo diners, but diners whose companions don't want to split a big pork dish) are very limited.

 

Yeah, I was just pointing out that this hasn't changed.

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  • 2 months later...

Going to the new Chodowrow restaurant Bar Basque in the new Eventi Hotel one whole block from here made me realize what a miracle the Ace Hotel and Ken Friemdman have accomplished.

 

As has often been noted, the Ace Hotel lobby is always packed with laptop-toating hipsters. What are they doing here on 29th St.? Where are they coming from? Certainly, the Eventi -- one block away -- seems like it's in the middle of nowhere. As do Millesime and the Carlton Hotel, one whole block in the other direction. No one's going to be hanging out in those places. How did management turn the Ace into such a hangout? And for whom?

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Going to the new Chodowrow restaurant Bar Basque in the new Eventi Hotel one whole block from here made me realize what a miracle the Ace Hotel and Ken Friemdman have accomplished.

 

As has often been noted, the Ace Hotel lobby is always packed with laptopped-toating hipsters. What are they doing here on 29th St.? Where are they coming from? Certainly, the Eventi -- one block away -- seems like it's in the middle of nowhere. As do Millesime and the Carlton Hotel, one whole block in the other direction. No one's going to be hanging out in those places. How did management turn the Ace into such a hangout? And for whom?

This post ought to be pinned, so that we can point it out next time anyone says that a particular restaurant is doomed to fail because it is "on the wrong block," or "in the wrong neighborhood." The Breslin is the ultimate "on the wrong block, and in the wrong neighborhood" place.

 

Now, I'm not saying that ordinary common sense about "where restaurants belong" is completely bogus, but some restaurants manage to defy the normal rules.

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Has no one noticed that the Ace and the Carlton used to be welfare hotels? But being reclaimed 100+ years old, at least the buildings may have a modicum of charm. The Eventi, as far as I can tell, is a new build, and therefore soulless as well as history-less.

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Going to the new Chodowrow restaurant Bar Basque in the new Eventi Hotel one whole block from here made me realize what a miracle the Ace Hotel and Ken Friemdman have accomplished.

 

As has often been noted, the Ace Hotel lobby is always packed with laptopped-toating hipsters. What are they doing here on 29th St.? Where are they coming from? Certainly, the Eventi -- one block away -- seems like it's in the middle of nowhere. As do Millesime and the Carlton Hotel, one whole block in the other direction. No one's going to be hanging out in those places. How did management turn the Ace into such a hangout? And for whom?

This post ought to be pinned, so that we can point it out next time anyone says that a particular restaurant is doomed to fail because it is "on the wrong block," or "in the wrong neighborhood." The Breslin is the ultimate "on the wrong block, and in the wrong neighborhood" place.

 

Now, I'm not saying that ordinary common sense about "where restaurants belong" is completely bogus, but some restaurants manage to defy the normal rules.

Am I misremembering timing or was the bar at the Ace already a huge scene before the Breslin even opened? between that, Opening Ceremony, and Stumptown its a pretty unique retail blend that is virtually impossible to recreate.

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Has no one noticed that the Ace and the Carlton used to be welfare hotels? But being reclaimed 100+ years old, at least the buildings may have a modicum of charm. The Eventi, as far as I can tell, is a new build, and therefore soulless as well as history-less.

That's true, but the Ace has developed a following that the Carlton, to date, has not. By the same token, I don't see why soullessness ought necessarily to follow as a consequence of being new. Everything was new at some point. What makes it soulless is what they did with it.

 

Am I misremembering timing or was the bar at the Ace already a huge scene before the Breslin even opened? between that, Opening Ceremony, and Stumptown its a pretty unique retail blend that is virtually impossible to recreate.

The Ace may well have opened before the Breslin did, but I don't think they were very far apart. Whatever the time lag may have been, it doesn't quite explain why the Ace would have succeeded in attracting a scene to a neighborhood that formerly lacked one.

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Has no one noticed that the Ace and the Carlton used to be welfare hotels? But being reclaimed 100+ years old, at least the buildings may have a modicum of charm. The Eventi, as far as I can tell, is a new build, and therefore soulless as well as history-less.

That's true, but the Ace has developed a following that the Carlton, to date, has not. By the same token, I don't see why soullessness ought necessarily to follow as a consequence of being new. Everything was new at some point. What makes it soulless is what they did with it.

 

Am I misremembering timing or was the bar at the Ace already a huge scene before the Breslin even opened? between that, Opening Ceremony, and Stumptown its a pretty unique retail blend that is virtually impossible to recreate.

The Ace may well have opened before the Breslin did, but I don't think they were very far apart. Whatever the time lag may have been, it doesn't quite explain why the Ace would have succeeded in attracting a scene to a neighborhood that formerly lacked one.

right - but the point is that the success of the Breslin is about more than the Breslin. The entire complex was engineered to appeal to a very particular demo and was succesful in appealing to that demo before the Breslin showed up. I have friends who love the bar scene there but never eat at the Breslin.

 

Those other places are much less holistic in their marketing approaches. Its a testament to the people who developed the ace more than anything else.

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