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Those biscuits in a can are only good for pigs in a blanket.

 

Get you some White Lily self-rising flour and make Shirley Corriher's biscuits. The best I've ever tasted. Seriously.

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Those biscuits in a can are only good for pigs in a blanket.

 

Get you some White Lily self-rising flour and make Shirley Corriher's biscuits. The best I've ever tasted. Seriously.

 

So true.

 

But for folks that live alone and don't want to cook up a mess o' biscuits, those frozen ones in the bag are a good alternative. You can just pop one, or two, into the toaster oven.

 

 

 

 

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Those biscuits in a can are only good for pigs in a blanket.

 

Get you some White Lily self-rising flour and make Shirley Corriher's biscuits. The best I've ever tasted. Seriously.

 

I had no idea the biscuits in a can were so nasty. They're ok when hot but within minutes there's a nasty aftertaste that just lingers.

The homemade one's sound great but this was about instant nostalgia and the frozen ones were pretty darn good.

Why are they called biscuits, by the way? Wouldn't the name suggest they were twice cooked, like biscotti?

 

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I don't know about tortillas, but I always thought that biscuits would go better with BBQ than the white bread or even the cornbread you are sometimes served.

 

Yes, but you'd definitely taste and feel and notice the biscuits. The whole point of the white bread is, just as Steve says, that it disintegrates, leaving not much to taste or feel in your mouth but the barbecue.

 

I never realized until I read this thread that the bread was a napkin. Now, I get it.

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Those biscuits in a can are only good for pigs in a blanket.

 

Get you some White Lily self-rising flour and make Shirley Corriher's biscuits. The best I've ever tasted. Seriously.

 

So true.

 

But for folks that live alone and don't want to cook up a mess o' biscuits, those frozen ones in the bag are a good alternative. You can just pop one, or two, into the toaster oven.

 

It is easy to bake up two biscuits and then your not stuck with a whole passel of cold biscuits for leftovers. I prefer the Mary B brand.

 

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Sorry, but the whole "bread as a napkin" thing is bull--nothing more than an outsider's effort to rationalize something that seems culinarily inexcusable. There's no point in looking for a "why," as if a panel of CIA graduates sat around in 1900 and put together a business plan for a "smoked meats concept." Nor did white bread creep in as an eleventh-hour corruption of some respectably artisanal ur-loaf. White bread is eaten with barbecue in Central Texas because that's how it's been eaten for nearly a century.

 

If a tourist can't get on board with it, he's free to load up his carry-on with crusty Acme sourdough or whatever other goddam hippie bread* he thinks would pair nicely with post oak smoke. He can bring his own baguette to New York to rectify the inadequacies of the hot dogs there and a rosemary focaccia to improve his muffuletta in New Orleans. He's on crack, though, if he thinks locals will recognize that kind of dish-gentrification as "improvement."

 

Scott

 

* I like goddam hippie bread. It has its place. But food is a product of culture--more often than not, working class culture. The West Coast artisanal bread movement doesn't have anything to do with how people in Lockhart have lived and eaten for the past century. Yet, despite the quality of bread (or, who knows, maybe because of it), Lockhart has produced a food micro-culture that skunks the hell out of any other city in Texas, including the major population centers.

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Sorry, but the whole "bread as a napkin" thing is bull--nothing more than an outsider's effort to rationalize something that seems culinarily inexcusable. There's no point in looking for a "why," as if a panel of CIA graduates sat around in 1900 and put together a business plan for a "smoked meats concept." Nor did white bread creep in as an eleventh-hour corruption of some respectably artisanal ur-loaf. White bread is eaten with barbecue in Central Texas because that's how it's been eaten for nearly a century.

 

If a tourist can't get on board with it, he's free to load up his carry-on with crusty Acme sourdough or whatever other goddam hippie bread* he thinks would pair nicely with post oak smoke. He can bring his own baguette to New York to rectify the inadequacies of the hot dogs there and a rosemary focaccia to improve his muffuletta in New Orleans. He's on crack, though, if he thinks locals will recognize that kind of dish-gentrification as "improvement."

 

Scott

 

* I like goddam hippie bread. It has its place. But food is a product of culture--more often than not, working class culture. The West Coast artisanal bread movement doesn't have anything to do with how people in Lockhart have lived and eaten for the past century. Yet, despite the quality of bread (or, who knows, maybe because of it), Lockhart has produced a food micro-culture that skunks the hell out of any other city in Texas, including the major population centers.

HI Scott, thanks for the chuckle. White bread is just that and it is served with every bbq order up here in Oklahoma also.

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I didn't like the bread so I just didn't eat it. But this tradition surely didn't come out of a hat. i'm sure the bread "evolved" from a simple white bread the German butchers enjoyed. I just can't believe it was the same bread. the same with the vinegar hot sauce. I'm sure this was from some Mexican influence mixed with the old Euro style. Things can and do change.

 

If all you alls like your white bread as is, I wouldn't dream of changing it, however. For me, i'd say dont' mess with those ranch beans. Those were incredibly good and as I've found out since returning home, almost impossible to replicate.

 

And for the record, most people were eating the bread. I was the only one I saw playing napkins with it.

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And for the record, most people were eating the bread. I was the only one I saw playing napkins with it.

 

Yes, you played it like a fiddle.

 

Actually, watching your little grease-laden fingers going up and down, more like a flute.

 

It was mesmerizing.

 

 

 

 

 

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Rancho: sausage gravy ain't rocket science, you don't need a mix. Fry up a bunch of sausage in a cast iron skillet. Remove and set aside. Reserve enough of the fat in the pan to make a roux. Add a few tablespoons of flour and whisk over medium heat. Add a bunch of black pepper. Add whole milk, whisking entire time. Once the liquid comes up to boiling point you can judge thickness. Once it is as thick as you like it, take some of cooked sausage and crumble it into the gravy. It is very easy, it took me longer to type this than it takes to make sausage gravy.

 

I've never had the biscuits in the bag, but making biscuits with self-rising flour, shortening, and a little water is not hard. Just don't overwork the dough and don't twist the cutter when you punch out your rounds.

 

p.s. they serve the same white bread with the bbq in memphis. it's standard.

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perhaps he doesn't type as quickly as you do.

 

we always just make extra homemade biscuits and baking the extra till done but not brown and then we freeze those for later. grab one or two at a time and throw them in the oven to warm anytime

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