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Check out Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations

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posting on a food forum is not the same as blogging.

That's your lesson for the day, isn't it?

 

yes. i'm just waiting for wilfrid to tell me that because some idiot journalists think they are the same thing it must be so.

 

And you teach people to read.

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But one is that (unlike Wilfrid and many here) I believe in at least attempting to preserve anonymity in reviewing. If all restaurants knew off the bat who prolific posters were, their restaurant evaluations would worth much less.

 

Anyone who cares will have linked your real name to your handle by now. (I see Daisy made the same point.)

 

Yup, OTB is always a revisionist force, but the sudden reversion to the nickname vs real name debate is just incredibly 1996.

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posting on a food forum is not the same as blogging.

 

If this is in any way an issue, I want to state my complete agreement with mongo.

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Yup, OTB is always a revisionist force, but the sudden reversion to the nickname vs real name debate is just incredibly 1996.

 

I wasn't on the internet in 1996, so I want to do all that over.

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posting on a food forum is not the same as blogging.

You really should tell that to Bourdain.

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I would absolutely refuse to post on a foodboard using my real name. Lots of reasons.

 

But one is that (unlike Wilfrid and many here) I believe in at least attempting to preserve anonymity in reviewing. If all restaurants knew off the bat who prolific posters were, their restaurant evaluations would worth much less.

I agree about the alias thing. I have my reasons and they are good ones. But preserving anoymity low on my list. Although I try very hard to be fair and to disclose any personal interest or connections at the outset.

 

And I am sure you have been 'made' by many,many places you frequent.

 

I was shocked that the Momofuku and Public people figured me out as quickly as they did, and I don't post as many reviews as you do and am not as effusive. I think that people that are interested in food, ask a lot of questions about it, discuss it with their table mates during the meal, may just stand out to all but the least aware restaurant staff. And that makes it easier to put two and two together,put a face/name to it, if you're some f.o.h. person reading online reviews and discussions.

 

Well, there are lots of other reasons.

 

ETA: But that doesn't necessarily apply to the first time you go somewhere, does it?

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Interesting show. Just to clarify... Shaw only mentioned his previous job and earnings once; they ran that clip 3 times, twice as promo before commercial. I think.

 

But he still came off sounding like a jerk. I was watching on YouTube and my mother was sitting close by (but not looking at the screen). She heard the comment and said, "Who said that? Bourdain? Wow, that's very arrogant!" Then I told her who it was and she said, "Ya. I thought he was arrogant when we met him, too."

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at the dotbomb in the early 2000s i worked with someone who'd made 500k a year at his previous job at one of the big 5 consulting companies. he was much better than me at powerpoint.

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Does the tea boy really make $400k at Lehman Brothers? No wonder they went bust.

steering those trolleys and not spilling is not easy

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at the dotbomb in the early 2000s i worked with someone who'd made 500k a year at his previous job at one of the big 5 consulting companies. he was much better than me at powerpoint.

Don't be modest. Aren't you the guy who came up with Repo 105?

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But one is that (unlike Wilfrid and many here) I believe in at least attempting to preserve anonymity in reviewing.

 

Sorry to dig this up, but I missed it earlier.

 

I am not sure that really is my position. The question I've raised over and over again is whether, given that consistent anonymity is not an option for the Times critic, and that the occasional restaurant which fails to spot him is at a disadvantage, the pretense of anonymity should be dropped.

 

I concede, I think, that readers might benefit from true anonymity - I am not persuaded that anyone benefits from a charade.

 

For my own reviews, I am anonymous almost all the time. But I've been eating out in New York for nearly twenty years now, and of course there are chefs and restaurant staff who know me simply because they've seen me around so often. A subset of those also know that I am "Wilfrid." There's really not much - within the realms of dignified behavior - I can really do about that.

 

And if people know me (and Sneakeater and Daisy), they surely know Sifton, Platt, et al.

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Mr Bourdain offers some additional thoughts.

 

In the old days, all you had to do was co-opt, coerce, bribe, blow or otherwise flatter a small group of powerful food writers.

 

You’ve been critical of some food media. Do you think the more we get, the more quality we get?

I think the more the better, honestly. I totally disagree with those who are still crying about the Internet: “They’re not experts.” When you’re talking about “is a restaurant good or not ?” or “where should I eat in Saigon?”—you read enough bloggers, you will arrive at a reasonable consensus. The old system, where you had lions of food criticism—that was a totally corrupt and moribund system. It was just one big clusterfuck of the same people at the same restaurants, using the same adjectives.

 

Maybe there’s a democracy of food writers emerging, but among chefs, aren’t we going the other way? There are the chefs we worship, and then there are the rest. Was it that way 30 years ago when you graduated from the Culinary Institute of America?

Society’s evaluation of a chef has completely changed. It used to be the name of the maître d’ you knew. Now everybody’s interested in the back. The balance of power has changed from the customer always being right to: What is the chef good at, and what does the chef want us to eat? Those are good things! The celebrity-chef thing, even at its worst, its most annoying, its silliest, its goofiest, its most egregious and cynical, has been a good thing.

When you talk about celebrity chefs, you mean people on TV?

Bobby Flay is both a celebrity and a working chef, so he would certainly fit that description. But David Chang is a celebrity chef, too, and he doesn’t even have a TV show. In the old days, all you had to do was co-opt, coerce, bribe, blow or otherwise flatter a small group of powerful food writers. Now it’s a different game. You have to be pretty smart about your image.

 

Read more: http://chicago.timeout.com/articles/restau...w#ixzz0kYBcRqg0

 

Time Out

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Tony seems to be walking towards the light and away from his friend Batali's "these Internet jerks have no right to judge me" position.

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Is it me or is Tony becoming softer and less snarky after becoming a babydaddy?

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