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Check out Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations

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I don't understand why anyone would waste their precious time on someone of no substance.

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There is no shortage of local opinion about Monday's Maine episode here in Portland.

 

Most here view the city's restaurant choices as half-baked, but I see Street & Co and J's Oyster as a nod to Portland's established Old Port restaurant scene rather than choosing among the flurry of newer, and arguably better, places that command most of the attention these days.

 

The sailing crew was awkward - I know characters like these - but I felt the segment was edited in because it demonstrated a rugged determination that people up here have to do shit like go sailing in January, or trek up to their camp to chill out in the snow, and basically enjoy their vast backyard in a way people to the South and West can't come close to doing, or even imagining.

 

Conte's Restaurant is a known love-it-or-hate-it dump, but the man himself is hard-core. Personally, I would treat those scallops differently.

 

The episode spoke to me about the people in Maine, not the food. In that sense, I'm happy about it - especially the folks in pairs that bookend the segments. Sure, lots of worthy coverage was missed - stuff way beyond blueberries and lobster like hard-working organic farmers and innovative Portland cuisine, but I sense Tony was trying to get to what Maine was about, and for that I applaud him, and his team.

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I don't understand why anyone would waste their precious time on someone of no substance.

Oh, come on.

Where?

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I'll take that as indicating you have as little substance as you think Bourdain has.

Probably less - that's why I don't waste precious time on myself either.

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I'll take that as indicating you have as little substance as you think Bourdain has.

Probably less - that's why I don't waste precious time on myself either.

Figures. But your posts of late have been talking to yourself.

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I'll take that as indicating you have as little substance as you think Bourdain has.

Probably less - that's why I don't waste precious time on myself either.

Figures. But your posts of late have been talking to yourself.

Exactly!!!

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There is no shortage of local opinion about Monday's Maine episode here in Portland.

 

Most here view the city's restaurant choices as half-baked, but I see Street & Co and J's Oyster as a nod to Portland's established Old Port restaurant scene rather than choosing among the flurry of newer, and arguably better, places that command most of the attention these days.

 

The sailing crew was awkward - I know characters like these - but I felt the segment was edited in because it demonstrated a rugged determination that people up here have to do shit like go sailing in January, or trek up to their camp to chill out in the snow, and basically enjoy their vast backyard in a way people to the South and West can't come close to doing, or even imagining.

 

Conte's Restaurant is a known love-it-or-hate-it dump, but the man himself is hard-core. Personally, I would treat those scallops differently.

 

The episode spoke to me about the people in Maine, not the food. In that sense, I'm happy about it - especially the folks in pairs that bookend the segments. Sure, lots of worthy coverage was missed - stuff way beyond blueberries and lobster like hard-working organic farmers and innovative Portland cuisine, but I sense Tony was trying to get to what Maine was about, and for that I applaud him, and his team.

 

 

Bordain often tries to include a broad slice of local flavor in his shows, so Maine folks would certainly fit that metric.

 

FWIW, I suspect places like Maine, Alaska, Wyoming, etc own a part of the American psyche. The wild, raw, slightly off kilter way of life that many people appreciate, but wouldn't want to actually DO for any length of time

 

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I'll take that as indicating you have as little substance as you think Bourdain has.

Probably less - that's why I don't waste precious time on myself either.

You shouldn't anyway - they say it makes hair grow on your palms.

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I'll take that as indicating you have as little substance as you think Bourdain has.

Probably less - that's why I don't waste precious time on myself either.

You shouldn't anyway - they say it makes hair grow on your palms.

Too late, but at least I have enough to comb it now.

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Bourdain does a Chicago Tribune interview about what he would do, if given leadership of the Food network

 

 

1) Never let Sandra Lee near a cooking element

 

2) Bring back Molto Mario for a basic cooking instructional

 

3) Suggest Rachael Ray "move on"

 

 

Trib

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Bourdain's new book (Medium Raw) is reviewed by the wonderful Moira Hodgson in today's Wall Street Journal. As he makes the rounds flogging the book, he often exposes interesting parts of his personality. To wit: to begin an aversion to McDonald's in his young daughter, he explains that Ronald McDonald has head lice.

 

He hates vegetarians, raw-food enthusiasts and celebrity chefs' product endorsements. But then he confesses that he also "sold out" when promoting "Kitchen Confidential"—and that, deep down, he sort of understands why, for instance, Emeril endorsed toothpaste. So many people depend on Emeril for a living that he's obligated to keep expanding his empire. Mr. Bourdain also retracts some of his past invective, admitting that it was "excessive and bombastic" of him once to refer to Alice Waters, the revered doyenne of California cuisine, as "Pol Pot in a muumuu." But he's not exactly making nice now by saying: "With Waters's fondness for buzzwords like 'purity' and 'wholesomeness' there is a whiff of the jackboot, isn't there?"

 

The news last year about a deadly strain of E.coli in hamburgers sends Mr. Bourdain, an unabashed carnivore, into a paroxysm. The meat was sold by the food giant Cargill, "the largest private company in America. A hundred and sixteen billion dollars in revenue a year," he rails, yet the company tried to "save a few cents on their low-end burgers" by using meat scraps that had been treated with ammonia to kill bacteria. The words "meat" and "treated with ammonia," he says, should never appear in the same sentence "unless you're talking about surreptitiously disposing of a corpse."

 

Mr. Bourdain is a vivid, bawdy and often

foul-mouthed writer. He thrills in the attack, but he is also an enthusiast who writes well about things he holds dear. His detailed reporting on the backroom lives of restaurant employees is terrific. One of the most moving parts of the book is a chapter on a Dominican, Justo Thomas, who has spent the past six years in a tiny room below the kitchen of Le Bernardin in New York, cleaning 700 pounds of fish a day and cutting it into perfectly uniform portions. Breaking rules of the trade, Mr. Bourdain takes him to lunch in the dining room, where Mr. Thomas for the first time gets to taste the fish he has prepared.

 

The author is dazzled by the great chefs. In addition to worshiping David Chang, he thinks that Grant Achatz of Alinea in Chicago is "probably a genius, one of the best chefs in America." Yet Mr. Bourdain hates the restaurant. Why? "My meal there was one of the longest, least pleasurable meals of my life. Twenty minutes in, and I was looking at the little menu card, counting the (many) dishes to come, ticking off the hours, minutes, and seconds I'd have to remain before earning my freedom. I thought it lethally self-serious, usually pointless, silly, annoying, and generally joyless. It was, for me, a misery from beginning to end."

 

 

WSJ

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I'll buy it. I like his writing.

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