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Coming to Portland in April for IACP


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When I was in Portland last spring, I couldn't sneak out from my conference to try to get together with anyone. :( I don't want to make that same mistake again. :D

 

I expect to be free on Wednesday after 8pm, on Friday evening after 5:30 (and maybe lunch as well), and Saturday afternoon into evening (flying home 11pm).

 

Would love to meet up with anyone, if possible. Or get recommendations of places in any case. I'm staying at The Nines, and will be relying on Tri-Met or walking.

 

TIA!

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When I was in Portland last spring, I couldn't sneak out from my conference to try to get together with anyone. :( I don't want to make that same mistake again. :D

 

I expect to be free on Wednesday after 8pm, on Friday evening after 5:30 (and maybe lunch as well), and Saturday afternoon into evening (flying home 11pm).

 

Would love to meet up with anyone, if possible. Or get recommendations of places in any case. I'm staying at The Nines, and will be relying on Tri-Met or walking.

 

TIA!

 

Hi Suzanne!

 

The Urban Farmer in The Nines is actually a pretty decent place to eat, so when you're pressed or tired fear not.

 

Kenny and Zuke's good deli, but you get plenty of that already I guess.

 

Clyde Common, more than solid food and good drinks.

 

Teardrop Lounge, the best place in the are for cocktails, make sure you go there.

 

Ten01, really good food and very good cocktails.

 

50 Plates, fun menu, decent drinks.

 

Blue Hour, good drinks.

 

Spints Alehouse, full of awesomeness.

 

Cassidy's great late night stop for food and a solid drink.

 

Pok Pok, really awesome Thai.

 

Caffe Mingo, solid Italian

 

Pambiche, really great Cuban, open early to late

 

Laurelhurst Market, awesome food and drinks, it's a haul, but worth it. Take a cab in fact. This would be the other don't miss.

 

Beast, meat lover's paradise.

 

Screen Door, really good southern food with some innovative twists. If you somehow get free for brunch on Saturday, go here, but all meals are good.

 

Paley's Place, still killing it.

 

Le Pigeon, make your reservation now.

 

Pope House, huge bourbon and rye selection.

 

I may head down for a few days that week. I'm not going to IACP but it would be fun to see people.

 

Rocky

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  • 1 month later...

So here's where/what I ate (not counting the tastes from a large number of restaurants at the opening reception):

 

Tuesday, 4/20:

By the time I got to my hotel (The Nines, very very nice), it was about nine hours since I'd had a burger and braised greens at JFK, so I was peckish. Went up to Departure on the top of the hotel and had a glass of sparkling shiraz and the Wagyu Brisket, two little sandwiches in puffy-Peking-duck-type buns. The space was a bit disorienting at that hour (2:30am New York time), very Jetsons-ish, but the wine and food were good. The neatest thing was that the cilantro on the sandwiches had plenty of flavor (it's been months since I've gotten good fresh cilantro).

 

Wednesday, 4/21:

As part of a tour for members of the Entrepreneurs Section, we stopped first at Cacao and besides tasting some of the chocolate bars, had small cups of hot chocolate. It was even better than the stuff at Le Pichet in Seattle. Then on to Smith Teaworks for tasting a bunch of teas. Then The Sugar Cube, one of the Mississippi food carts, where we had a teacake with rhubarb coulis and a lemon cream on top -- a terrific balance of sweet and tart. At The Meadow, we tasted salts. Lunch was at Ned Ludd, where first we saw the farm out back. The meal was housemade charcuterie with pickled celery and red onions (all wonderful, and I got to scarf up most of the testa after I told my tablemates what was in it :lol: ); a very fresh salad (only the radishes came from Short-Cut Farm, though); ruby trout, stuffed with lemon slices and fennel frond and roasted in the wood oven, served with braised fennel and leeks in a really delicious olive oil; and a rhubarb and apple crisp that had a wonderful smoky edge from the oven. On to Ristretto Roasters for a little coffee, Pix Patisserie for something (who could eat by then, let alone remember anything? :lol: ), ending up at the New Old Lompoc Brewery, where we got to taste, among others, a beer that had been aged in bourbon barrels (pre-release). Interesting. Not something I'd drink every day. Or maybe any other day. Not bad, just . . . different.

 

No dinner after the reception, for which I did not get a program of participating restaurants. But just about everything I tasted was very, very good.

 

Thursday, 4/22:

I played hooky from the plenary that was mostly Ruth Reichl and a little Kim Severson to go to Powell's and then have lunch at Kenny and Zuke's. Already discussed here. No real dinner, just a terrible, minimal reception before the awards ceremony. Luckily, I tagged along with someone to an after-party as Nostrana and had some good pizza (crust a little too thin for the topping) and excellent meatballs.

 

Friday, 4/23:

Breakfast was the only conference-provided "meal" I had. It was edible, sort of, but minimal. Never mind.

Lunch was mostly tasting samples at the Culinary Expo. What was provided as "lunch" was various Pacific packaged soups.

Dinner, however, was wonderful, at Fenouil. My dining companions had been there for a party a few days before, and were very happy to be going back. Soup of the day was a fennel velouté garnished with a salad of celery, baby beets, and Oregon black truffles. Totally delicious soup, and the truffles did add something. My main was roasted lamb loin and very crisp nuggets of lamb sweetbreads served with fresh peas, favas, and cloves of roasted garlic. My friends had halibut and scallops, and loved them. We also ordered the pea-fava combination for the table. I did not mind the repeat in the least. Ah, spring! Desserts were a tart of strawberries and Meyer lemon with a very light cream and a crumbly crust with a bit of grated fresh coconut (at least, we all thought that was there) and a "vacherin" with (iirc) a rhubarb parfait, stewed rhubarb, and a topping of a quenelle of lovage-flavored cream. That one is pictured on the home page. We also had a piece of a sheep cheese that came with honey in the comb, an apricot puree, and one other fruity goo (much better than that sounds, but I just don't remember and didn't write it down :( ). Wine was a riesling from Eroica that even if it didn't quite work with my lamb, was excellent with everything else.

 

Saturday, 4/24:

Back to Kenny and Zuke's for breakfast before going to a conference session at Le Cordon Bleu.

I cut my second morning session to check out the Portland Farmers' Market. Since the very first stand I saw was selling wild mushrooms for (to me) incredibly low prices, I was immediately hooked. I bought some dried tart cherries, tart prunes, and dry-roasted hazelnuts to bring home. Was too full to sample anything, or buy any of the enticing pastries or pizza or biscuits with chicken gravy or tamales or burritos.Very impressive market.

After an afternoon at the Portland Art Museum but before leaving, I had an early-ish dinner at Urban Farmer (back at The Nines). To be honest, I'm getting kind of tired of places that have to list the provenance of everything; all I really need to know is that they know their purveyors directly. But I was happy I had a chance to do a compare-and-contrast on three New York strip steaks (for my palate, the Niman Ranch cornfed actually beat out one grassfed and another that had been dry-aged for 21 days :o ) and a huge serving of roasted foraged mushrooms. (The staff were nice about packing up my leftovers for travel.) A glass of Arrowood (sp?) 2005 cabernet sauvignon went quite well. I also had a little cheese that came with a "pistachio-bacon-bourbon" puree/sauce. Now that would make a breakfast of champions on your morning toast!

 

 

I did much, much better with eating in Portland this year than last, around the same time. Maybe I'll have to visit again next April solely for that purpose. :P What a happy thought!

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I thought the whole Denver IACP thing was pretty awful. So poorly organized and attended, I just couldn't see going to another one. I'm glad to hear this was better for food. How were the sessions? How was attendance?

I think I'll go to Austin next year but just to eat and say hi unless there are some not to miss sessions planned.

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I thought the whole Denver IACP thing was pretty awful. So poorly organized and attended, I just couldn't see going to another one. I'm glad to hear this was better for food. How were the sessions? How was attendance?

I think I'll go to Austin next year but just to eat and say hi unless there are some not to miss sessions planned.

I think they said attendance was something like 1200, which was way back up from Denver. (Iirc, that was only about 700.) Can't say that the organization was any better, esp. since sessions were held all over town, literally. But I enjoyed the sessions I went to:

  • Brad Farmerie and Adam Farmerie on "The Restaurant of the 21st Century," although apparently a number of attendees to that one did NOT like the content and walked out :rolleyes:
  • Michael Ruhlman, Karen Page, and Andrew Dornenburg on "The Death of Recipes?" which wasn't quite an accurate title, but it was a good discussion on whether we need recipes, who needs them, and what to do about training people to use them
  • Irena Chalmers on "Your Career, What's Next?" which was more of a "let's share suggestions and helpful hints for each other," although Irena had some very interesting examples of where some of her CIA students have ended up
  • Kamal Mouzawak talking about the foodways of Lebanon and demonstrating a couple of recipes.
But those were less than half the possible session slots.

 

As for next year, it's time to start thinking about possible topics to suggest. I know I've already started thinking about a potential session. Dunno how interesting it would be to most (unless I just read off some of the outtakes I've collected), but it's can't hurt to propose something.

 

Edited to correct stupid grammatical error. :blush:

Edited by Suzanne F
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As for next year, it's time to start thinking about possible topics to suggest. I know I've already started thinking about a potential session. Dunno how interesting it would be to most (unless I just read off some of the outtakes I've collect), but it's can't hurt to propose something.

 

I heard that there's no compensation or stipend anymore. Is that a rumor? The old $500 wasn't much but it was something. I can't believe they'd take that away.

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As for next year, it's time to start thinking about possible topics to suggest. I know I've already started thinking about a potential session. Dunno how interesting it would be to most (unless I just read off some of the outtakes I've collect), but it's can't hurt to propose something.

 

I heard that there's no compensation or stipend anymore. Is that a rumor? The old $500 wasn't much but it was something. I can't believe they'd take that away.

 

I hadn't heard that. Will need to check. But I can easily believe that they would take it away. What a bummer. When I moderated a session back in 2005, there was a total honorarium that could be split up among panel participants.

 

 

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Can't say that the organization was any better, esp. since sessions were held all over town, literally.

 

I think that was by design rather than a lack of organization. I think the original plan was just to have everything at the convention center. But the locals in charge decided to make it more about Portland, put it a couple blocks from the farmers market, amongst good restaurants rather than the dearth in the immediate vicinity of the convention center, and include lots of outings and less sterile venues.

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