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Chillies/chiles


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I started this on 'reasons to be cheerful' then thought they deserved their own thread.

 

Unexpectedly fast delivery of chillies from Peppers by Post has made my Friday afternoon. Also they added a couple of bags of chillies extra free: Whippet Tail which are red and very long, like 10-12 inches, and Hungarian hot wax. I now have a good stock of poblanos, jalapenos and serranos plus a bag of mixed varieties ranging from green to pale yellow, orange, light red, dark blood red to blackish purple, all different shapes, all fresh picked yesterday :D Made the afternoon of a couple of colleagues who turned out to be into that kind of thing and were happy to help themselves to a few.

 

By coincidence I was sorting out my dried chillies at home this morning, trying to get them all in one place so I don't get muddled. Shocked to discover I have around 20-25 different types :D

 

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Well, mine are not all Mexican - there's Indian, Thai and Spanish in there as well.

 

My quick, convenient reference book for chiles is usually Mark Miller's The Great Chile Book. It says that ancho and mulato are both types of dried poblano. However they are quite different in shape in the photos, the ancho being like a blunt triangle. And the text for mulato says as follows: "Like the ancho, the mulato is a type of dried poblano. A deep, dark chocolate brown, but medium-brown when held up to the light. Rounded shoulders [anchos are rather square shouldered], usually tapering to a point, and measuring about 4 to 5 inches long and 2 to 3 inches across. Medium thick fleshed, has a smokier flavour than the ancho, without the depth or lingering taste. While the predominant tone is liquorice, there are hints of dried cherry, tobacco, and horehound."

 

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I'm currently drying an assortment of chiles right now-habanera, dutch, cayenne and thai are the ones I can identify. I got a bag of "very hot" chiles at the Brooklyn Chile Festival. I haven't decided what I'll do with them after drying.

Here's a guide to some of the less common chile shapes.

 

Peppers

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:D There are too many places to post things. I did post something I made on the Mexican thread the other day - that's all I've done so far. Will make Huevoquiles tonight that will also go on the Mexican thread.

 

N.B. Peppers by Post stop supplying early December due to the end of the growing season. Even now is getting a bit late, then you have to wait until next summer. So if you're thinking of ordering, I'd do it now. I can really recommend the chiles - they are so much fresher than what you buy in the shops.

 

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Well, mine are not all Mexican - there's Indian, Thai and Spanish in there as well.

 

My quick, convenient reference book for chiles is usually Mark Miller's The Great Chile Book. It says that ancho and mulato are both types of dried poblano. However they are quite different in shape in the photos, the ancho being like a blunt triangle. And the text for mulato says as follows: "Like the ancho, the mulato is a type of dried poblano. A deep, dark chocolate brown, but medium-brown when held up to the light. Rounded shoulders [anchos are rather square shouldered], usually tapering to a point, and measuring about 4 to 5 inches long and 2 to 3 inches across. Medium thick fleshed, has a smokier flavour than the ancho, without the depth or lingering taste. While the predominant tone is liquorice, there are hints of dried cherry, tobacco, and horehound."

 

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thanks

 

i should have been more specific with my question. anchos and mulatos are both dried poblanos. what's the differnce in the poblanos? is one of them riper? are they grown in different areas? are they dried differently? anybody?

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Strangely, it is difficult to get information on this. Essentially, due to the thickness of the poblanos they have to be pre-treated in some way to dry out. The ancho is made from riper red fruit, the mulatos are not as ripe when dried. There may or may not be differences in the drying process and this may vary from region to region.

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From the Chile Head site, which really is the best I have found to date:

 

When dehydrated, the green Poblano chile is better known as Ancho or Mulato. The difference between them depends on a pair of genes that make the first one ripen to a dark red colour while the second becomes a dark brown, almost black. When they are fresh, they are difficult to identify, but when they become dried, it becomes very easy. The blackish Poblano chile is a darker colour and has a slightly sweeter taste that the green Poblano.

 

The seems to be a number of different varieties within the classifications also. So the Mulato isn't an under-ripe version, it is a different strain that retains it's chlorophyl on ripening.

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Sound Italian peasant food, attractive to those who follow the fad of low carbohydrates: Ciambutella di Filomena from Susan H. Loomis' Italian Farmhouse Cookbook. No pretensions towards 'cuisine' of any kind.

 

Italian frying peppers specified but not to be had in this country outside Turkish/Greek/Middle Eastern shops. Within many miles of me there's only a Greek shop in Chiswick that didn't have any, but then I turned up some green organic Romeros for serious money in the wholefood shop round the corner from where I live. Supplemented with a poblano plus a Hungarian hot wax pepper that was also specified and was in my box from the chile people. All roughly chopped (I deseeded because I dislike pepper seeds in my food) and sauteed in olive oil. A little onion added and softened, then a couple of tomatoes, which happened to be poncey nice proper Italian plum tomatoes from La Fromagerie a couple of weeks ago. Salted, a cup of water added and left to simmer for a while.

 

Then spicy Italian sausages (bought from Tavola the other day after paying the crook in the sporting antiques shop down the road for a picture for work) chopped in chunks, added to the mixture and simmered 20 minutes or so. Finally a mess of 4 beaten eggs stirred in until reasonably set, and served.

 

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From the Chile Head site, which really is the best I have found to date:

 

When dehydrated, the green Poblano chile is better known as Ancho or Mulato. The difference between them depends on a pair of genes that make the first one ripen to a dark red colour while the second becomes a dark brown, almost black. When they are fresh, they are difficult to identify, but when they become dried, it becomes very easy. The blackish Poblano chile is a darker colour and has a slightly sweeter taste that the green Poblano.

 

The seems to be a number of different varieties within the classifications also. So the Mulato isn't an under-ripe version, it is a different strain that retains it's chlorophyl on ripening.

Yes. Jean Andrews who has written some of the most authoritative books on peppers states that dried anchos and mulatos come from different cultivars of poblanos. The one that becomes an ancho ripens to a deep red while that which which becomes a mulato ripens to a deep chocolate brown, which explains the name.

 

Strangely, she also mentions that poblanos in the US are usually imported from Mexico because growers in the US have found that poblanos seldom attain their typical form. I haven't noticed that problem with poblanos grown on the south coast of England!

 

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so copying the impeccable taste of Vanessa, my order from Peppers by Post arrived today. 3 lovely looking poblanos that will be Sunday's supper in some stuffed form. a bag of Hungarian hot wax that I will probably roast and a mixed bag with lots of chillis I have never seen before including a orangey/red non waxy one shaped like a bell with a small upturned bell underneath it. oh, and some tomatillo that are destined to be a relish.

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this recipe for Pickled Chiles is from the Chile Head website that Adam posted about.

 

Recipe By : The Goodness of Peppers by John Midgley (Pavilion Books Unlimited, London).

 

225g/8 oz. whole fresh chiles

350ml/12 fl. oz/1 1/2 cups white wine vinegar with 1 teaspoon salt

sprig of bay

sprig of rosemary

4 gloves of garlic, peeled

up to 350ml/12 fl. oz/1 1/2 cups extra white wine vinegar

Inspect the chiles for damage, discarding any that are bruised, lacerated or otherwise blemished. Snip off all but the base of their stems. Bring the vinegar and the chiles to a boil in a pan. Add the remaining ingredients except the extra vinegar and simmer for 6-8 minutes. With a clean spoon, transfer them to a jar previously sterilised with freshly boiled water. Pour in the pickling liquid with its herbs, top up with the additional vinegar to cover and allow to cool before sealing.

 

The chiles will be ready within a month.

 

This quantity will fill a medium-sized jar with whole chiles, preserved with herbs and garlic and up to 675ml /1 1/2 pints /3 cups of vinegar. Increase the vinegar quantity and dilute it with a little water if you want to preserve a larger quantity of chiles, or sweet red and yellow peppers, which should first have their caps, seeds and pithy membranes removed.

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