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Wilfrid

Non-political response to BBC British election coverage

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You know, that is something that seems very British: the mandate. I remember BBC using the term quite often during the 2008 US Election, whereas here in the US the term seems to have disappeared from the media.

I've heard it for more than 10 years.

 

Over 3 million hits here.

 

Over 2 million hits there.

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Real question is: what do the bookmakers think?!

Good point. I can't find odds online reflecting the current situation.

In truth, I'm not even sure you could make book on this. The chances for insider betting on it would be huge (say, from family of LD inner circle or people in Lab inner circle).

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It looks like Harriet Harman, as deputy leader of the party, is going to be speaking for Labour now.

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What a pleasure this is. Finally the political experience of the 1970's is relevant again - just as €750bn of imaginary money placates the market.

 

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Miners. Board games by candle light. Grocer Heath. Sudden leap in birthrate. Ee, it takes me back.

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I'm hoping for a Darling-Balls contest.

Shouldn't that be a Balls Darling contest?

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Now increasingly large numbers of Labour MPs are coming out against a deal with the Liberals.

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Unnamed Liberal MP (quoted in the Guardian)

 

I can't believe how much they've offered us. The Tories have basically rubbed out their manifesto and inserted ours. We'll have to cope for four or five years with our flesh creeping, but still.

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Can we talk about how much of a disappointment Obama has been? Non-politically, of course.

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Unnamed Liberal MP (quoted in the Guardian)

 

I can't believe how much they've offered us. The Tories have basically rubbed out their manifesto and inserted ours. We'll have to cope for four or five years with our flesh creeping, but still.

 

I am surprised this deal came off. Ostensibly the Tories have indeed given up some important tax changes, and who knows what else? Once the feet are under the table in Number 10, it may be a different story. I think strain will show after the honeymoon is over.

 

And Harriet Harman is interim leader of the Labour Party.

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Can we talk about how much of a disappointment Obama has been? Non-politically, of course.

 

It would be hard to think of a better example of the kind of post this thread has avoided. I knew you could do it.

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Can we talk about how much of a disappointment Obama has been? Non-politically, of course.

In the same way as a video of seals having sex isn't pornography, discussion of the British elections isn't politics.

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The speed with which things suddenly move, for example. Cameron has just visited the Old Baked Bean and is now Prime Minister. No waiting three months for an inauguration.

 

One thing that makes this possible is the permanent, professional, non-political civil service. I would be interested to compare that with the U.S. equivalent, but don't know enough about it. For example, although Cameron will appoint a new Chancellor the Exchequer, all the staff at the Treasury - senior and junior - remains the same; people will show up tomorrow and continue in the same jobs they had today. To what extent would that be true in the States?

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The US has that as well - they're referred to as "career employees" and do not rotate out during changes in administration. To be sure, they don't occupy the most senior policy making slots.

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The US has that as well - they're referred to as "career employees" and do not rotate out during changes in administration. To be sure, they don't occupy the most senior policy making slots.

Even when they aren't career employees, transitions can be slow. A friend of ours was a senior PR rep for the Sec'y of Defense under Clinton (whoops!). She kept that position under Bush, working for Rumsfeld, for almost 2 years into their administration, even though she was a flaming liberal Dem.

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