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This gets filed under "you learn something new every day." I never knew that some people disliked turkey. Thanksgiving must be a bitch.

After 35 or so years of cooking Thanksgiving dinner, plus making a turkey for the first seder, my mother announced that she hates turkey. None of us had any idea. We still have one on Thanksgiving (gotta keep the traditions), but now we have brisket on Passover.

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Can't seem to find a existing thread.   Other then the great sandwiches I've been hearing about has anyone tried dinner?

No, of course not, it was a point worth making - which he made.   I didn't notice the print critics making it. I've not been to this place, and you can add it to a lengthy list of Italian restaura

Or you can make a reservation at a civilized time at Ed's Chowder House and enjoy a 5 Course Dinner prepared by Chef Ed Brown for $55. http://www.chinagrillmgt.com/promotions/?r=58&p=76

This gets filed under "you learn something new every day." I never knew that some people disliked turkey. Thanksgiving must be a bitch.

After 35 or so years of cooking Thanksgiving dinner, plus making a turkey for the first seder, my mother announced that she hates turkey. None of us had any idea. We still have one on Thanksgiving (gotta keep the traditions), but now we have brisket on Passover.

 

I don't really like turkey, either, and not many people in my immediate family do. We usually do prime rib roast on holidays.

 

But I'd still have tried that sandwich if someone else had ordered it.

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But then it has been argued before that a true test of a chefs technique is taking a simple product and making it shine. The very base to Italian cuisine. No?

But then I won't dive into how Italian a turkey sandwich is. :lol:

 

Edited to add. One thing I think is obvious. These young chef's certainly paid their dues coming up in the industry from Troisgros to WD50 to Guy Savoy to Cafe Boulud. And even though they have gotten much press over their sandwiches I think their restaurant is much more then that.

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To make a turkey sandwich, you have to have the turkey to put into the sandwich. If they make this turkey in-house (as they do), in a way that tastes better than other similar turkey, what makes you think you could easily make it at home? Why doesn't everybody else have it, then? Why is it less worthy of note than anything else any restaurant does well?

 

ETA -- Although of course what the food media are excited about are the DINNERS here, which I understand do not involve turkey sandwiches. Not that I can ever get into one.

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To make a turkey sandwich, you have to have the turkey to put into the sandwich. If they make this turkey in-house (as they do), in a way that tastes better than other similar turkey, what makes you think you could easily make it at home? Why doesn't everybody else have it, then? Why is it less worthy of note than anything else any restaurant does well?

 

ETA -- Although of course what the food media are excited about are the DINNERS here, which I understand do not involve turkey sandwiches. Not that I can ever get into one.

 

 

Which according to Oakapple (who I trust more than Sifton), isn't all that exciting.

 

Cold mozzerella, goopy/bland squid marinara, broccoli rabe, pickle salad, ricotta gnocchi (which I had for dinner this week) -- really? With such an impressive resumé to back them up, I was expecting the culinary equivalent of virgins with a Greek chorus. Or something.

 

Oh right, forgot the so-called fresh ham drizzled with cheddar. Like ham and cheese is something new. :rolleyes:

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The mozzarella is hand formed to order and room temperature. As in momofuku ssam it depends on the ham being sliced which needless to say has gotten much praise. I also trust Oakapple's opinion but he visited a restaurant the changes its menu daily. All the antipasti's other then the mozz were different on my visit. I may argue the point that those ricotta gnocchi could be made at home. At least not by the average home cook. Like I said it was not a life changing meal but as for the food itself I enjoyed it more then Babbo.

 

I think if someone is willing to eat early the wait is no longer then waiting to be seated with a reservation in many cases.

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I'm off next week so a dinner there might be possible. At least I'll go away well-fed -- but I rather doubt I'll be singing hosannas to olive-oil packed tuna fish.

Also worth noting. I noticed the online menu often uses a play of words. I think they enjoy the element of surprise. :lol:

 

I hope you enjoy it if you go. With reasonable expectation I expect you'll walk away satisfied and happy with your meal.

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The mozzarella is hand formed to order and room temperature. As in momofuku ssam it depends on the ham being sliced which needless to say has gotten much praise. I also trust Oakapple's opinion but he visited a restaurant the changes its menu daily. All the antipasti's other then the mozz were different on my visit. I may argue the point that those ricotta gnocchi could be made at home. At least not by the average home cook. Like I said it was not a life changing meal but as for the food itself I enjoyed it more then Babbo.

 

I think if someone is willing to eat early the wait is no longer then waiting to be seated with a reservation in many cases.

That's the key. I really don't get the scorn some have for restaurants that cook 'something I could make at home'. I am a very good cook. But sometimes I don't feel like/have the time to roasting a chicken for example but feel like eating roast chicken. And am happy to go to a restaurant for it.

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The mozzarella is hand formed to order and room temperature. As in momofuku ssam it depends on the ham being sliced which needless to say has gotten much praise. I also trust Oakapple's opinion but he visited a restaurant the changes its menu daily. All the antipasti's other then the mozz were different on my visit. I may argue the point that those ricotta gnocchi could be made at home. At least not by the average home cook. Like I said it was not a life changing meal but as for the food itself I enjoyed it more then Babbo.

 

I think if someone is willing to eat early the wait is no longer then waiting to be seated with a reservation in many cases.

That's the key. I really don't get the scorn some have for restaurants that cook 'something I could make at home'. I am a very good cook. But sometimes I don't feel like/have the time to roasting a chicken for example but feel like eating roast chicken. And am happy to go to a restaurant for it.

based on my lunch experiences I have no doubt the food is good - but I sort of see a little bit of the shake shack/NYMag pr driven frenzy around this place that I find off putting. Glad they are doing well, but I'm just a bit skeptical of the degree of praise it gets.

 

BTW I can seen them pulling curds before service to make the mozz but I would be quite surprised if they do "to order" - actually if it were to order it would be warm no?

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