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So the point of this article was to promote the Red Rooster or is Marcus taking a writing class at some community college

Also, Harlem Shake (where I'm going next time) (not remotely a destination, of course).

It's terrific. The thrill of Shake Shack with no line. They also have great service there. lots of friendly faces. Good hot dogs too.

 

Keep in mind I do like a Shack Burger.

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And some guy sitting next to me at a bar told me wonderful things about Maison Harlem once (although the menu doesn't have me running).

Not remotely a destination but great for the neighborhood. Especially that part of 125th st/St. Nicholas.

 

I LIVE AND WORK IN HARLEM EVERYONE!

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I never got to Mountain Bird. Wasn't sure it would last.

 

The original Mountain Bird was three blocks from my apartment. Went there about six times while they were open to show support. Sweetest couple imaginable. Don't make it to the new location as often. The tapas place that replaced it wasn't putting out great product the first couple of visits but might be time to try them again since they've crossed the six month mark and seem to be doing steady business.

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  • 4 years later...

Reservation for Red Rooster coming up. I had the impression that the menu is tamer now than when it opened, and I confirmed that by looking at the duck liver pudding and oxtails on my first visit ten years ago.

Apparently I dined there "on my way to a very late night entertainment at a very obscure and creepy bar.  Never mind that."

What on earth was that?

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There was a time I would not have got a booth to myself. That was cool.

We're not criticizing restaurants, right, until they're not broke any more?*

The food was nice. The deviled eggs had some kind of caviar on them, not mentioned on the menu. The crab cake also had a nice relish (no idea), and good collard slaw. Then a huge bowl of shrimp and grits. All well prepared.**

I cannot say what the wine list was pre-pandemic, because I haven't been here in years, but having read comments elsewhere, let me note only six bottles are offered (plus two baller champagnes). And the BTG champagne I asked for was not available -- of course, they might not have wanted to open it for the one diner that week who would ask for it. I can't believe the list looked like that 10 years ago, but as I said, I don't know if it was reduced before the dark ages.

*But can the table not just be icky sticky?

**It's not destination food, which it kind of was once, I don't know how long ago.

 

 

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21 hours ago, Wilfrid said:

We're not criticizing restaurants, right, until they're not broke any more?*

If you mean individual restaurants that are still broke, sure, let's be nice. If you mean as a whole, and we're not criticizing any places until the industry as a whole rises - then nah, I'm ready to start criticizing.

If a restaurant managed to put more seats on the sidewalk and in the street than they ever had indoors and filled them to capacity every night, and now that indoor dining is open they've got double their old capacity and are still packing them in, then yeah, they're open to criticism if they put out shit. I can think of one I'm ready to start with.

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To me, it's like, I'm ready to criticize restaurants for what they're doing, including bad responses to COVID circumstances.

But I'm not willing to criticize them for reasonable responses to COVID circumstances, even if those responses have negative consequences.

If that makes any sense.

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Willie Dixon was a good songwriter but he wasn’t much of a frontman, and his versions of his songs, usually done years after the original versions that made the songs famous, were never the hits; they were effectively cover versions, made to capitalize on the popularity of other people’s versions (both the original blues hits and the Rock Band covers that followed them) — and never ever nearly as good as the originals (Dixon, a bass player, wasn’t a tenth of the singers Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters were).  The Stones (and all the White Boys who did that song) were covering the Wolf record.  Dixon’s version probably hadn’t even been recorded when the Stones and the other British bands did their versions. 

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