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I mean, we'd all be pretty offended if someone opened up a restaurant in the South Side making fun, however gently, of Dominicans (at least I hope we would).

 

I knew I would have to repeat this at some point, but I think my whole theme, starting with the Pink Pig post, was that the name is not supportable:

 

I don't want to get into whether it's a cute goof or perhaps a little tasteless to bill your cuisine as traif when you are neighbor to a large Hasidic community. It's not my fight. I will say that it does the restaurant itself insufficient justice.

 

Maybe I should have launched a campaign, but I didn't think it was my job. I hope the two owners read my review, are reading this, and ars they made a pointless problem for themselves.

 

I hear you about about making fun of Dominicans of course, but part of the great difficulty here - and hard to discuss within the guidelines - is really coming up with an analogy, whether it be Dominicans, African Americans, Mexicans... I mean you need to find a member of group naming a restaurant to needle the rest of the group. The obvious place to look is Islam, where I am sure it is possible.

 

PLEASE Wilfrid, understand, none of this is directed at you.

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Do Chinese restaurants in Seattle serve fainting chicken?

 

Haha. Nope, guess it can be on the menu but not the sign. I wonder what would happen if someone subtitled their restaurant "Best Drunken Chicken!" ? There is one that says "Taste of Greece". (Have I succeeded in hijacking this thread?)

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...its original meaning of an animal that isn't dead yet (which would make it nevelah) but is so sick that it will die within some period of time.

 

Yo, can I just get a half point for ""Traif" - unkosher, as it's generally rendered, although it originally referred to the pre-vehicular equivalent of roadkill"?

 

You try so hard, you get a full point and a note from the rabbi saying you never have to eat at Sammy's again, ever. Maybe you come do shabbat with us at the shtetl?

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Because it seems ambiguous, just to clarify what I was trying to say (and if this veers too far into politics please delete it), the un-American opposition to that center makes me worry what kind of Muslim-baiting will go on if it is ever opened.

Yeah, and the cross at Auschwitz was just to honor the Carmelite nuns. And the US Civil War was about State's rights.

 

I think we can all agree that if this restaurant were to open in the muslim neighborhood outside Detroit, the liberal wing wouldn't be laughing it off as only juvenile and immature.

 

As for the restaurant itself, as my father is fond of telling me, "the worst anti-semite is a Jewish anti-semite."

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I went to high school with the chef/owner. There's nothing remotely surprising about this.

You mean he's always be a smartass a self-hating Jew a guy who tries desperately to be funny but fails miserably?

 

Yeah, this is about right.

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I hear you about about making fun of Dominicans of course, but part of the great difficulty here - and hard to discuss within the guidelines - is really coming up with an analogy, whether it be Dominicans, African Americans, Mexicans... I mean you need to find a member of group naming a restaurant to needle the rest of the group. The obvious place to look is Islam, where I am sure it is possible.

The Holy Cow, Indian steakhouse.

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i'm waiting for "the spotted pig" to open a branch near a mosque, or for someone to open a steakhouse next to a hindu temple.

 

Darling, it's crowded here. Restaurants aren't two hundred miles apart. :rolleyes:

 

The Breslin, or Meat Center Greaseface City as we call it, made some cosmetic changes to their facade and/or windows to protect nearby Mosque attendees from sight of the pig feet.

 

The ideal analogy is opening a restaurant focusing on pork near a mosque and calling it Haram, which is the muslim equivalent of trayf.

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i'm waiting for "the spotted pig" to open a branch near a mosque, or for someone to open a steakhouse next to a hindu temple.

 

Darling, it's crowded here. Restaurants aren't two hundred miles apart. :rolleyes:

 

The Breslin, or Meat Center Greaseface City as we call it, made some cosmetic changes to their facade and/or windows to protect nearby Mosque attendees from sight of the pig feet.

 

The ideal analogy is opening a restaurant focusing on pork near a mosque and calling it Haram, which is the muslim equivalent of trayf.

 

Is that really fair? It isn't next to a synagogue it is adjacent to a very religious neighborhood.

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From my point of view, when I heard about the restaurant, I thought the name was funny but in bad taste.To me, it seems unnecessarily provocative.

 

Exactly my thoughts.

 

Me too. I am just extra frustrated because I went and liked everything else about it.

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i'm waiting for "the spotted pig" to open a branch near a mosque, or for someone to open a steakhouse next to a hindu temple.

 

Darling, it's crowded here. Restaurants aren't two hundred miles apart. :rolleyes:

 

The Breslin, or Meat Center Greaseface City as we call it, made some cosmetic changes to their facade and/or windows to protect nearby Mosque attendees from sight of the pig feet.

 

The ideal analogy is opening a restaurant focusing on pork near a mosque and calling it Haram, which is the muslim equivalent of trayf.

 

actually that would be kind of funny.

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  • 3 weeks later...
But you want to hear about the taboo stuff. Rock shrimp are strewn over puffy corn cakes, their brine buffered by a mango-tomatillo salsa ($8); chubby scallops arrive saturated in a fragrant sage-pistachio brown butter ($16); cockles get intimate with pancetta in a delicate pasta with a chili sucker punch ($12).

 

Then there was the seared foie gras, slumming it with fingerling potatoes, crisp shards of ham, and a fried egg, all dribbled with maple syrup and hot sauce ($15). Now this is chutzpah. Eric Ripert might weep to see foie gras treated thus. It’s what you eat after a night of slugging Cristal. It’s the Beastie Boys shrieking “Sabotage!”

 

 

Cute review.

 

http://events.nytimes.com/2010/08/11/dining/reviews/11under.html?ref=dining

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