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Obviouisly, it's stupid to order something johanna tells you not to.

 

I had the Emilia-Romagna menu, which includes the bolito misto.

 

Everything else was good to excellent. The fried gnocco with mortadella and other salumi were about the best I've had (I've never been to Bologna). The gnocco were a little more substantial than usual in this dish (all to the better, I thought) -- but still light enough and absolutely grease-free. The kind of clean, precise cooking we expect from Chef Benno's kitchen. (Chef Benno wasn't there last night, BTW -- which lent the night a serenity it might not otherwise have had.)

 

For a primo, tortellino in brodi. This was a little better as a regular menu item here last year: it had a certain overwhelming fragrance then that this iteration lacked. Still very good, though.

 

Then, the dread bolito misto. I braved it because johanna had been told that her bowl was abberational. It was not. The point of this dish is the deliciously delicate flavor of the boiled meat. There is no place for a heavy, full-flavored balsamic vinegar reduction. You're supposed to get the three little bowls of light condiments to go with it -- for a reason.

 

Still an excellent place, I think, despite this misstep.

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So, given this New York Times article excludes Sud as a possible name for Benno's new $20M restaurant at Lincoln Center, I thought I'd start a new thread.   I need to look at a map; I'm having a

Because I want my name next to it. Ask the admins to change the title of the last one.

I thought that TBD is short for "to be determined" and that the restaurant's actual name hasn't been settled yet.

Never been to Lincoln & the balsamic reduction sounds uninteresting to me. As for this dish being one that should not be heavy on whatever saucing & condiments are used, I fully agree. On all our Italy trips, including our recent stay in Florence, even the places serving the heaviest versions of this dish (Casalinga in the Oltr'arno comes to mind) leave the heaviness to the meats themselves and supply little to put on the dish. Unlike my grandmother's cooking, which boiled the flavor right out of the meat and needed whatever we could get our hands on to add flavor, the meats are to do the talking in this dish and good chefs know this and can get it right.

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I went to ABT last night. As I had a date, I made a dinner reservation afterward instead of trusting to a bar spot somewhere. The various online estimates for when the performance would end ran from 10:05 to 10:20. Lincoln's last reservation on a Monday is 10:15; their kitchen closes at 10:30. I made a 10:15 reservation. When reserving, I told them this would be post-ABT.

 

We ran out of the theater without waiting for the bows, but made it to Lincoln only at 10:30 sharp. They told us the kitchen had closed.

 

I think this is disgraceful. Lincoln isn't like most restaurants: it is the fine-dining place on the Lincoln Center campus. It is the only restaurant I've ever been to whose dining room is named for a donor: the enterprise may be for-profit, but its space is rented from a not-for-profit. This restaurant, above others, has an obligation to serve the Lincoln Center audience -- even if they have to do so at a loss. I think it should have been written into their lease that they have to stay open for post-performance service.

 

(It's especially notable that this was a Monday night. That's traditionally a slow night at restaurants. But the longstanding New York tradition is that Monday night is "opera night" -- the night to go so as not to interfere with your weekend, and so as to avoid an unengaged dilettante audience. So while most restaurants properly curtail their Monday hours, Lincoln is the one that absolutely shouldn't.)

 

I can think of ways for Lincoln to capitalize on its location and make itself the New York equivalent of the opera house cafes that dot Europe. Give free meals to the principal performers and creators of every Lincoln Center show, to encourage them to come for post-performance suppers. Audience members might flock there then, knowing that they'd be having supper near the performers they'd just seen. Stuff like that.

 

I just think the current situation is deplorable.

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I went to ABT last night. As I had a date, I made a dinner reservation afterward instead of trusting to a bar spot somewhere. The various online estimates for when the performance would end ran from 10:05 to 10:20. Lincoln's last reservation on a Monday is 10:15; their kitchen closes at 10:30. I made a 10:15 reservation. When reserving, I told them this would be post-ABT.

 

We ran out of the theater without waiting for the bows, but made it to Lincoln only at 10:30 sharp. They told us the kitchen had closed.

 

I think this is disgraceful. Lincoln isn't like most restaurants: it is the fine-dining place on the Lincoln Center campus. It is the only restaurant I've ever been to whose dining room is named for a donor: the enterprise may be for-proftt, but its space is rented from a not-for-profit. This restaurant, above others, has an obligation to serve the Lincoln Center audience -- even if they have to do so at a loss. I think it should have been written into their lease that they have to stay open for post-performance service.

 

There is no point in requiring a service that is not supported by the economics. I don't think any of Lincoln Center's other restaurants are open for late dining, either, are they?

 

(It's especially notable that this was a Monday night. That's traditionally a slow night at restaurants. But the longstanding New York tradition is that Monday night is "opera night" -- the night to go so as not to interfere with your weekend, and so as to avoid an unengaged dilettante audience. So while most restaurants properly curtail their Monday hours, Lincoln is the one that absolutely shouldn't.)

 

The logical place where that reasoning ought to govern, if it does anywhere, is the Metropolitan Opera House's own restaurant, the Grand Tier—and yet it doesn't.

 

(I realize that Lincoln is a great restaurant, and the Grand Tier is not, but the quality of the two establishments is not what has determined their operating hours.)

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The new bar in what will soon no longer be Avery Fisher Hall stays open after every performance (and I assume is required to).

 

Are they still serving dinner at 10:30? Unlike the Met, the Philharmonic is generally out by 9:30, so Lincoln would still be open then, as well.

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We had a 9:15 reservation at Lincoln last Monday (6/1), following the panel discussion of Joan of Arc at the Stake. That event was shorter than expected, so we got to Lincoln just before 9:00; our check was opened at 9:02. At that time, there were maybe a half-dozen table occupied, total. We had the four-course menu, and it took us quite a while to decide which dishes to order. I think that we were only on our primi when the kitchen started closing up--certainly after 10:00. By the time we finished our secondi, there were maybe two people in the kitchen: the grill cook still cleaning the station and the dessert person, cleaning while waiting for us to be ready to order. When our check was run at 11:23 pm, the kitchen was long since completely empty.

 

Note that this was a Monday, when most LC houses are dark. I would not expect much of a late crowd on such a night. The fault was in Lincoln's allowing you to make a 10:15 reservation on what was sure to be a slow night, not that they wouldn't honor your reservation when you showed up 15 minutes late. As oakapple said: "There is no point in requiring a service that is not supported by the economics."

 

BTW: I just checked the ABT website. Like so many other performing organizations (Met Opera for sure), they tell how long the performance is expected to be. So you could have checked what time you'd be out and reserved dinner accordingly.

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As I said in my initial post on this, I DID check. I got two different answers from two different ABT-related sources. The LATEST answer had the performance ending at 10:20. I told them about that when I made the reservation.

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But what I'm pissed off about isn't their having accepted the reservation and then failing to honor it. I'm pissed off that they're not open to accept post-performance walk-ins as well.

 

And as I also said in my initial post, Monday might be dark in most venues, but not at the Met -- where it's actually the historic traditional New York City "opera night".

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