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I just think that if Lincoln Center is giving out a franchise (or whatever legal arrangement they make) to be "the" on-site Lincoln Center restaurant, the restaurant should be contractually required to service Lincoln Center audiences. It's a given they're going to be light after the 7:30 and 8:00 curtains: that goes with the territory. If anything, my plan that they stay open after the final curtain would help make up for that slow period.

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So, given this New York Times article excludes Sud as a possible name for Benno's new $20M restaurant at Lincoln Center, I thought I'd start a new thread.   I need to look at a map; I'm having a

Because I want my name next to it. Ask the admins to change the title of the last one.

I thought that TBD is short for "to be determined" and that the restaurant's actual name hasn't been settled yet.

But what I'm pissed off about isn't their having accepted the reservation and then failing to honor it. I'm pissed off that they're not open to accept post-performance walk-ins as well.

 

I'm with Suzanne: they should know that a 10:15 post-concert reservation has a pretty good chance of being 15 minutes late. Concerts don't always end at the exact time. The guests have to get out of the hall, and across the plaza, which can easily take another 10 minutes.

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Lincoln is not "the" on-campus restaurant of LC. It is one of three open to the public, not only to hall patrons. It is only "the" restaurant because it's the one you prefer. (And because it's the best of the on-campus three, of course.) If your proposed new "contract" is made between Lincoln Center and the public restaurants on property under its control, then the restaurants at Fisher and Tully Halls would have to be included. That would spread the post-performance, on-campus-dining customer pool among three restaurants, diluting it considerably. Would there be enough performance-goers plus public diners to fill the total number of seats necessary for late closing to be economically feasible? Esp. when only one house is lit? What percentage of ticket-holders choose to dine after the performance, and choose to dine on-campus? Not all potential diners have your taste or the depth of pocket that you do. Would the number who do dine on-campus after performances really make up for the "slow period"? Were there many other patrons turned away with you? How many of the public were turned away?

 

I suppose someone like Orik could work up a formula that takes into account the potential number of ticket-holders who might want to dine after a performance at one or more houses, plus some number of the public, in order to predict how many late diners there might be at each of the restaurants. Best-case, worst-case, all sorts of variables. But that calculation might have to be done day-of, which makes it useless for staffing and supplying a restaurant.

 

Then again, in your proposed "franchise contract," maybe you might include that LC will underwrite the extra expenses of keeping all three establishments open two or more hours beyond the final curtain at the last house to finish. (You wouldn't want them to rush you out, now, would you?) To sweeten it for the restaurant owners/management. Good luck.

 

 

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Why would my proposed contract have to be extended to all on-campus facilities? There's no rule that says it has to be. In fact, we already have evidence that the Avery Fisher bar's contract has such a provision, whereas the contracts with the Marcus Sammuelson place in Alice Tully, Jason Denton's place in the movie theater, and, of course, Lincoln don't.

 

And Lincoln is "the" on-campus restaurant, different from all the others, because it's the only one that isn't housed inside a particular venue. So it's equally accessible from all of them (and in fact seems to have been pretty carefully placed to be so). If I were to have to walk over to the Sammuelson place in Alice Tully from the Koch Theater, it would be just as easy to go to Bar Boulud. Not so Lincoln.

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  • 1 month later...

On the way to The King and I last niight, we passed Lincoln. Seven pm curtain, place was sold out. I was quite surprised that Lincoln was less than half full. When we left the show at about 9.45, it still looked about half filled.

 

We dined at Atlantic Grill, which is our go-to place in that area, along with Boulud Sud. Nice serving of their lobster + salmon + wasabi roll, and a serving of their spring rolls with the truffled potato sticks and a few beers.

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Definitely was not very full last night, not when we walked in just before 7 or when we left.

 

The food was....fine. The "zuppa di couscous alla trapanese" had nary a couscous to be found. The waitress claimed they were incorporated in the broth, and seemed to be used to fielding inquiries about missing couscous. For $36, I would have expected more than a small piece of tuna, a piece of stuffed squid, 2 mussels and 2 clams. The pasta was excellent, as always. A reminder, yet again, to ignore the "secondi" section in upscale Italian restaurants.

 

Service was mixed. A long wait after receiving menus - they were decanting (very carefully I might add) the wine we brought, but for some reason the waitress didn't think we'd care to order, get bread, etc, in the meantime. They also brought the wrong dessert at first - not to be a pig, but I feel like when that happens, usually the graceful solution is to just leave the extra one on the table, rather than take it back to the kitchen.

 

Still, though, one of my favorite places to sit and eat in NYC. The view just can't be beat.

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I love this post, Tubbs. Everything about the dining experience was annoying, yet you still find the positive...

 

Still, though, one of my favorite places to sit and eat in NYC. The view just can't be beat.

 

 

I gotta try this zen shit.

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I love this post, Tubbs. Everything about the dining experience was annoying, yet you still find the positive...

 

Still, though, one of my favorite places to sit and eat in NYC. The view just can't be beat.

 

 

I gotta try this zen shit.

If I could just sit and eat pasta and drink wine and stare out the huge windows into the plaza...I'd be a pretty happy man.

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They have been participating in Restaurant Week for lunch only. rnh17 on CH found that meal disappointing.

 

 

 

My lunch yesterday at Lincoln Ristorante might mark the end of my long fling with Restaurant Week. Not that the meal was terrible, but as the third disappointment in a row, it made me wonder, why bother? As usual, my wife and I shared six items on the menu. The most interesting for me was the cold summer squash soup which was pretty, complex, and tasty. The poached tuna with pickled market vegetables was an overload of sourness. I'm not sure what they were thinking with that dish. We had the wine pairing for an extra $12 (two 4 oz. glasses), and the white wine paired with the appetizers was quite nice. I had high hopes for the bucatini alla trapanese, but the thick fresh pasta was cooked a minute or two too long. The light trapanese sauce was nice, but this was not a simply wonderful pasta plate that I might remember fondly years later. The desserts were typically complicated creations, that left me wondering, why not just serve me a delicious cupcake?

 

Speaking of service, it was rushed, bordering on harried. If formal service has a purpose, it's to make you feel calm and pampered, isn't it? Formal service at warp speed is pointless. Forget the bread tongs, just give us a couple of slices of bread. The somm seemed quite knowledgeable as he rapidly delivered his set piece on the wines, but he obviously had no time to chat....

 

I always figured RW is a gamble that might pay off handsomely, but now I'm wondering if it's no longer worth the $25 bet.

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  • 1 year later...

FloFab:

 

 

JONATHAN BENNO, the executive chef at Lincoln Ristorante in Lincoln Center since it opened six years ago, is leaving in a month or so. He is working on his own restaurant downtown, a move long on his agenda. The highly regarded Shea Gallante, who was at Cru and Ciano and was the executive chef at the Baccarat Hotel, will replace him. “I’m really confident with him taking over,” Mr. Benno said. “But it’s important that he has the time he needs to get comfortable driving a new car and making it his own.” Mr. Gallante, who also worked with Lidia Bastianich for four years, will continue with Lincoln’s objective of serving modern Italian fare, and said that maintaining the restaurant’s quality was of the utmost importance. Nick Valenti, the chief executive of the Patina Restaurant Group, which owns Lincoln, said he was sorry to see Mr. Benno leave, though he knew it would happen. “Part of me is pretty excited to have Shea on board,” he added.

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