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The NY Times has an article about the influence of north African cuisine on traditional Jewish foods. The emigration of many French north Africans to France in recent decades has created a different series of flavor profiles. One family has even adapted tapas for the family meal.

 

As the women gathered beneath an almond tree on the patio of Ms. Mas’s home, Ms. Chaouat served a potato salad, dipping two fingers in a jar of harissa and dabbing at the potatoes she had prepared, as she would do with other cooked vegetables.

 

“This is the way we share recipes,” Ms. Chaouat said. “Food is our identity, tradition and our roots.”

 

Each group of immigrant Jews brought its own influences.

 

“Moroccans like sweet and salty in everything,” said Ms. Chaouat, who works as a caregiver for the elderly. “Tunisians eat couscous, but it is always savory and we serve everything on the table at once.”

 

Vegetables stuffed with meat are a popular holiday dish. The stuffing sometimes is made with parsley or eggs, sometimes with nuts, and always cooked slowly. Ms. Levy’s version, a Moroccan dish with roots here, includes cinnamon, turmeric and nutmeg and is cooked at low temperature overnight to be ready on the first night of the holiday. (But it can also be cooked more quickly at a higher temperature.)

 

 

 

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The NY Times has an article about the influence of north African cuisine on traditional Jewish foods. The emigration of many French north Africans to France in recent decades has created a different

How do you feel about something Indian?  I had been thinking of making (or having N make) a Calcutta chicken curry that The World of Jewish Cooking says is traditionally eaten on Shabbat and Rosh Hash

For a while, we were helping out my in-laws by ordering from a place called, I think, Harold's. Which was then picked up by my Oradel based b-i-l and brought over to his parent's (Westwood based) hous

Holiday begins in less than 48 hours. I have no motivation. My menus aren't finalized. We'll be 6 for dinner on Wednesday, and I'm hosting lunch for 8 on Saturday. We have been invited out for one meal.

 

Here's what I've done - blanched 6 ears of corn, broiled/charred eggplants, made soup (which needs to be puréed and passed through a chinoise), made sorbet-base for apple honey sorbet. And completely scorched one pot in the process!

 

I'm fucked.

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Somehow, I know you'll pull it together, Bloviatrix.

 

I'm making a white gazpacho, followed by chicken with cardamom rice from Jerusalem, some last-minute sauteed squash with olive oil and garlic and tomato salad. Dessert will be the honey cake and plums with Melissa Clark wrote about in the Times. Before we sit down, I'll have some chopped chicken liver and hummus.

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My parents dropped off a honey cake when they came to visit on Saturday. In addition to his regular baking business, my father has a little cottage industry making these the week before Rosh Hashanah; I think he sold over 60 this year. His secret is adding (kosher) whiskey to the batter.

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My menu for tonight is coming together.

 

Chilled yellow tomato soup, lamb meatballs

Standing rib roast rubbed with roasted garlic, rosemary & thyme

Sauté of corn, mushrooms, and beans; preserved lemon and garlic aioli

Roasted sweet potatoes, frizzled scallions, and fresh figs; balsamic drizzle

Broiled rosemary scented stone fruit on arugula

Apple honey sorbet with toasted walnuts

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I stumbled on this recipe on Serious Eats: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/06/chilled-spanish-white-gazpacho-from-joanne-chang-flour-too.html?ref=search

 

There no bread, although bread seems to be standard in white gazpacho and a lot more grapes, but because of the cucumbers, it isn't really very sweet. The lime and coriander are quite forward. It's delicious. I have no opinion as to its authenticity and I don't care if it is or isn't.

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How do you feel about something Indian?  I had been thinking of making (or having N make) a Calcutta chicken curry that The World of Jewish Cooking says is traditionally eaten on Shabbat and Rosh Hashanah, and you can make it on the stove in a Dutch oven or Le Creuset.  We had tsimmes last year.

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I spent shabbat mulling my menus. Here's where I am for mains -

Friday night will be a tsimmes with meat (I really want to use flanken, but I have beef cubes in the freezer so I'll use that)

Shabbat lunch will be tuna in a preserved lemon and tomato sauce.

Saturday night will be our tradition gefilte fish as we're never in the mood for a big meal

Sunday lunch - hummus im basri which is hummus with ground lamb.

There will be soup, assorted sides. But no pizza ebraica this year. :(

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