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You know, it's not fair.

 

Nathan criticizes us Olds for eating too much fatty food (no one young, he says, eats a full three-course meal the way we Fat Old People do). Now you make fun of us for eating too little.

 

 

yeah but to Teddy I'm probably one of the Olds :)

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After having to visit the Whitney Museum (I can't stand art, I think it is so boring),

 

If you're planning on entering the restaurant business as a chef, you should try to learn to appreciate it. I find that really gifted chefs are artists, not just in terms of creating dishes (the composition of flavours), but also in the way they present those dishes. Why do you think plating is so important? And why do you think so many chefs seem to have great photography skills (I'm thinking of people like Shola Olunloyo of Studio Kitchen and many others whose names I can't remember right now).

 

BTW, I think you're writing is becoming much better. You seem to be taking greater care with your words (and spelling!), making it much easier to read your reviews.

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If you're planning on entering the restaurant business as a chef, you should try to learn to appreciate it. I find that really gifted chefs are artists, not just in terms of creating dishes (the composition of flavours), but also in the way they present those dishes. Why do you think plating is so important? And why do you think so many chefs seem to have great photography skills (I'm thinking of people like Shola Olunloyo of Studio Kitchen and many others whose names I can't remember right now).

 

 

See Ruhlman's The Making of a Chef and The Soul of a Chef for a pretty extensive argument about the difference between craft and art in the context of cooking. I tend to agree with Ruhlman that very, very, very few chefs are artists.

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Can you go into further description of the Arancini.. Do you know the type of cheese it was. Any other sauces, or flavor to the rissotto..

 

I ask this because, i recently served asparagus Arancini on a little dot of bernaise sauce to guests and it went over very well. I was kind of nervous that it would be considered to informal but, again, it was received nicely..

 

The risotto is combined with Pecorino and black truffles. There is no sauce. You can see a photo here: http://www.flickr.co...57625744393354/

 

que bella.. Wow, what's the fried stuff it's sitting on.. Little individual fried pieces of rice? That would be a cute touch... I bought a black truffle the other night for me and miss A.. (Miss K doesnt like them because they taste like dirt.. She has a better pallet than any of us) Was planning on cooking it last night but, tomorrow we are having it.. Already made an 18 egg yolk pasta for some tajarin or an egg yolk ravioli Al La one wonderful afternoon in Barolo.. Though, it was from a huge rock of White Truffle but, black shall do just fine... Then on to lobster and potato gnoochi with black truffles to finish.. Inspired by Duccasse though, I havent eaten his dish or seen the recipe.. it just sounds awesome...

 

Thursday I am making fried chicken.. Just dropped the pieces into the brine before the buttermilk soaking.. I guess it would be a waste to put the truffles underneath the skin prior to frying (certainly after all the other flavors interjecting) .. Though, if I ever find myself in Alba, it might on the agenda. I fear this truffled fried chicken will find itself on to some menu that is trying to drum up press as the world's most expensive fried chicken. Black truffles placed under the skin, perhaps with some truffle mashed potatoes or some other bullshit.. Might as well make it a foies gras truffle mashed.. or maybe some foies gras waffles or biscuits with some black truffles.

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If you're planning on entering the restaurant business as a chef, you should try to learn to appreciate it. I find that really gifted chefs are artists, not just in terms of creating dishes (the composition of flavours), but also in the way they present those dishes. Why do you think plating is so important? And why do you think so many chefs seem to have great photography skills (I'm thinking of people like Shola Olunloyo of Studio Kitchen and many others whose names I can't remember right now).

 

 

See Ruhlman's The Making of a Chef and The Soul of a Chef for a pretty extensive argument about the difference between craft and art in the context of cooking. I tend to agree with Ruhlman that very, very, very few chefs are artists.

 

Please reread my post taking special note of the bolded phrases.

 

So you think the chef that created this dish, for example,

 

2521070484_4c5c311e25.jpg

 

is not an artist? He's also the same person who designed this bowl, btw

 

4410125625_485bee3154.jpg

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See Ruhlman's The Making of a Chef and The Soul of a Chef for a pretty extensive argument about the difference between craft and art in the context of cooking. I tend to agree with Ruhlman that very, very, very few chefs are artists.

 

i guess it boils down to what your definition of an artist is.

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If you're planning on entering the restaurant business as a chef, you should try to learn to appreciate it. I find that really gifted chefs are artists, not just in terms of creating dishes (the composition of flavours), but also in the way they present those dishes. Why do you think plating is so important? And why do you think so many chefs seem to have great photography skills (I'm thinking of people like Shola Olunloyo of Studio Kitchen and many others whose names I can't remember right now).

 

 

See Ruhlman's The Making of a Chef and The Soul of a Chef for a pretty extensive argument about the difference between craft and art in the context of cooking. I tend to agree with Ruhlman that very, very, very few chefs are artists.

 

Please reread my post taking special note of the bolded phrases.

 

So you think the chef that created this dish, for example,

 

2521070484_4c5c311e25.jpg

 

is not an artist? He's also the same person who designed this bowl, btw

 

4410125625_485bee3154.jpg

 

He didn't say NO chefs were artists, he said very few were. I tend to agree that cooking is a craft, but we needn't hijack Teddy's thread into a debate on aesthetics.

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If you're planning on entering the restaurant business as a chef, you should try to learn to appreciate it. I find that really gifted chefs are artists, not just in terms of creating dishes (the composition of flavours), but also in the way they present those dishes. Why do you think plating is so important? And why do you think so many chefs seem to have great photography skills (I'm thinking of people like Shola Olunloyo of Studio Kitchen and many others whose names I can't remember right now).

 

 

See Ruhlman's The Making of a Chef and The Soul of a Chef for a pretty extensive argument about the difference between craft and art in the context of cooking. I tend to agree with Ruhlman that very, very, very few chefs are artists.

 

Please reread my post taking special note of the bolded phrases.

 

So you think the chef that created this dish, for example,

 

2521070484_4c5c311e25.jpg

 

is not an artist? He's also the same person who designed this bowl, btw

 

4410125625_485bee3154.jpg

 

He didn't say NO chefs were artists, he said very few were. I tend to agree that cooking is a craft, but we needn't hijack Teddy's thread into a debate on aesthetics.

 

Nor did I say all chefs were artists, and I think I implied "very few" when I wrote "really gifted chefs". I merely wanted to clarify what I had written (which I think had been mis-interpreted) and add some reference. My initial reply was to Teddy about something that he wrote, so I don't think I hijacked anything. Until now. (Although I supposed I really hijacked Wilfrid1's thread, since he's the op of the thread I'm reading)

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I don't think plating is anything approaching art. But we shouldn't go there.

Oh, please, please, may we go there? :lol:

 

I don't think anyone is saying that plating equals art. However, compare the plating at Joe Doe (the worst I've ever seen outside my own house :blush: ) with that at any number of high end places -- SHO is the one I was at most recently. Doesn't an eye for composition make the food seem better? Although lord knows, some chefs may put the "art" of their plates over the taste of their food. Balance is all, in this case as well.

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Of course it does. But that's craft, not art. I mean, come on. An "eye for composition" does not equate to art. Is arranging various tkochkies so they look nice on your coffee table art? (But let's not go there.)

 

Oh I don't know ...

 

Is throwing paint on a piece of plasterboard in a seemingly random fashion, art?

Is heaping a pile of pennies in a corner, art?

Are a bunch of Campbell soup labels painted on canvas, art?

Are a couple of pipes attached to a ceiling and painted blue, art? Click for example.

 

It might not be art to you, but it is to someone somewhere out there.

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