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Time Magazine:

 

A study released on Oct. 27 in the journal Obesity looked at the chemical structure of sweeteners in Coca-Cola, Pepsi and other sodas. There were a lot of surprising findings, but for now, here's one result that cut close to my Brooklyn-foodie fad-loving bones: Mexican Coke, which people thought to be superior to American Coke because it uses real cane sugar in place of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), could be a myth.

 

The cult of Mexican Coke has been well documented. In a 2009 trend piece in the New York Times Magazine, one fan described it as "more natural tasting" and "a little less harsh." At the time, a spokesman for Coca-Cola told the magazine that, at least ingredient-wise, a Coke is not a Coke is not a Coke:

 

 

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2010/10/28/study-hey-hipsters-mexican-coke-might-be-a-myth/#ixzz13lShV6LH

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Don't you remember the craze on eGullet when folks learned about Kosher for Passover Coke? They do a special run with sugar for the holiday instead of HFCS. You need to look for the yellow bottle caps

Did they have to make the caps yellow?

costco carries mega-packs of mexican coke. or at least they used to. i stopped drinking coke on the regular a couple of years ago and haven't looked in a while.

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I've seen ingredient labels stuck on to bottles of Mexican Coke that list HFCS as an ingredient. But the Coke still seems to taste better than the American product. That could definitely be psychological; or maybe the glass bottle makes the Coke taste different than a can or plastic bottle would.

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The big story the HFCS producers are pushing is moving into Mexico to take up for the slow decline in HFCS consumption in the US. As long as Sugar prices are high it works, so basically as long as EM growth is strong expect more and more HFCS in your mexican products.

Sometimes your TLAs escape me. WTF is EM? Emerging market?

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The big story the HFCS producers are pushing is moving into Mexico to take up for the slow decline in HFCS consumption in the US. As long as Sugar prices are high it works, so basically as long as EM growth is strong expect more and more HFCS in your mexican products.

Sometimes your TLAs escape me. WTF is EM? Emerging market?

yes

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Thank you. I don't understand why use of HFCS in Mexico is lagging the US. Aren't the major bottling facilities for Coke in Mexico fairly up to date? There would be very little retooling involved to get a bottling line to feed HFCS instead of a solution of refined sugar.

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Thank you. I don't understand why use of HFCS in Mexico is lagging the US. Aren't the major bottling facilities for Coke in Mexico fairly up to date? There would be very little retooling involved to get a bottling line to feed HFCS instead of a solution of refined sugar.

Historically HFCS has only been used in the US because of inflated sugar prices here due to tariffs, this isn't the case in Mexico, and up until recently it remained cheaper to use sugar. Even at current prices the price differential is pretty marginal so there isn't a big rush to make the switch. As you say, from a production perspective it isn't a big deal, although I think its a non-trivial change from a logistics perspective - so why make that investment if you aren't sure Sugar will stay priced where it is.

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Thank you. I don't understand why use of HFCS in Mexico is lagging the US. Aren't the major bottling facilities for Coke in Mexico fairly up to date? There would be very little retooling involved to get a bottling line to feed HFCS instead of a solution of refined sugar.

Generally, HFCS is used much less frequently in Mexico than it is in the USA. Your post appears to assume 1) that the use of HFCS is more 'up to date' than is the use of sugar. That position really doesn't make sense to me.

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Generally, HFCS is used much less frequently in Mexico than it is in the USA. Your post appears to assume 1) that the use of HFCS is more 'up to date' than is the use of sugar. That position really doesn't make sense to me.

Well, in the US, HFCS is certainly the most "up to date" from an industrial production/packaging technology standpoint. I'm not making a judgement about how public opinion might make HFCS seem less attractive to consumers.

 

AB points out something I wasn't aware of which is that the economics of sugar vs. HFCS are quite different in Mexico. Without the economic driver there is no reason to change the technology.

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Generally, HFCS is used much less frequently in Mexico than it is in the USA. Your post appears to assume 1) that the use of HFCS is more 'up to date' than is the use of sugar. That position really doesn't make sense to me.

Well, in the US, HFCS is certainly the most "up to date" from an industrial production/packaging technology standpoint. I'm not making a judgement about how public opinion might make HFCS seem less attractive to consumers.

 

AB points out something I wasn't aware of which is that the economics of sugar vs. HFCS are quite different in Mexico. Without the economic driver there is no reason to change the technology.

Yeah if our Sugar policy consisted of something more than "Keep a few families in South Florida crazy rich, and maybe hopefully fuck Castro" HFCS wouldn't even exist.

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Yeah if our Sugar policy consisted of something more than "Keep a few families in South Florida crazy rich, and maybe hopefully fuck Castro" HFCS wouldn't even exist.

The policy is keeping a few families in the Twin Cities area crazy rich as well.

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