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baked cauliflower


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on tomorrow's menu is a baked casserole of cauliflower in a bechamel and gruyere/grana padano sort of sauce and topped with more gruyere. can i make it tonight and hold it over night? i do this all the time with mac & cheese, but am worried about my cauliflower getting mushy. is my concern misplaced?

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on tomorrow's menu is a baked casserole of cauliflower in a bechamel and gruyere/grana padano sort of sauce and topped with more gruyere. can i make it tonight and hold it over night? i do this all the time with mac & cheese, but am worried about my cauliflower getting mushy. is my concern misplaced?

 

i know this is a bit late but i would roast the cauliflower separately. mix the sauce and veg the next day and bake together.

how did yours turn out?

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was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

 

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

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was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

 

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

slicing cauliflower thin is a pain in the ass, even with a mandoline. i steamed the cauliflower in the microwave and then set it on paper towel for a few minutes before putting it into the baking dish. it didn't release enough water in the baking to ruin the bechamel.

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was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

 

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

slicing cauliflower thin is a pain in the ass, even with a mandoline. i steamed the cauliflower in the microwave and then set it on paper towel for a few minutes before putting it into the baking dish. it didn't release enough water in the baking to ruin the bechamel.

my grandma used to make a very thick bechamel and sort of just daub it on the pre-cooked veg and then brown that - so it wasn't really a casserole per se, but it was awesome.

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was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

 

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

I steam my cauliflower then pour over the cheese sauce. I could serve it like that, but I like to brown under the grill/in hot oven.

 

Also, I don't follow any fancy white sauce recipes before adding milk and the cheese to the sauce. As per Jocasta Innes, brown your butter and flour in a pan for a couple of minutes then put in all of the milk as per your recipe's proportions and then bring to very quick boil while whisking. Then simmer for a bit. Forget about adding the milk little by bit (In fact I think that might lead to lumpy). I've never had a lumpy sauce. (And I've not found that steamed veg release much liquid at all.)

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was this a layered dish or was it vegetables in a casserole with the bechamel/cheese poured over and then baked?

the latter

I want to try making it that way. I have seen recipes for layered cauliflower gratin that require thin sliced of cauliflower, but it sounds like a pain in the ass.

 

did you have any problem with cauliflower releasing a lot of water while baking and diluting the bechamel?

I steam my cauliflower then pour over the cheese sauce. I could serve it like that, but I like to brown under the grill/in hot oven.

 

Also, I don't follow any fancy white sauce recipes before adding milk and the cheese to the sauce. As per Jocasta Innes, brown your butter and flour in a pan for a couple of minutes then put in all of the milk as per your recipe's proportions and then bring to very quick boil while whisking. Then simmer for a bit. Forget about adding the milk little by bit (In fact I think that might lead to lumpy). I've never had a lumpy sauce.

my method is close to yvonne's. i brown some onions or shallots in butter add in the cream and then corn starch and then the cheese. my casserole was sort of a faked mac & cheese, so there was loads of cheese in the white sauce and on top. i topped with rice crumbs and grated piave in the last 10 minutes of the bake

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