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[NYC] Time Warner Cable Internet/Phone


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  • 6 months later...
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I am shortly setting out to strangle every single Verizon employee in NYC, their families, pets and neighbors. When I'm finished I will require a new internet and phone provider. Does anyone have any

just switched from TWC internet to cablevision/optimum for internet only. cablevision is much faster and a little cheaper. they make you buy your own router unless you're also getting cable and phon

you probably weren't bitchy enough

Charter says its buying Time Warner. http://money.cnn.com/2015/05/25/media/charter-time-warner-cable-deal/index.html

Yikes! I have Charter and they do well to keep things up and running on their own. Example, I DVR'd the last Letterman show but due to "technical difficulties" only about 40 minutes was recorded. Charter may be biting off more than it can chew.

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  • 1 year later...

spectrum (charter + twc)

what fresh hell will this be?

 

Satan is already licking his chops at fresh opportunities. Maybe they'll recruit some of Verizon's HR people to demoralize the installers, repair teams etc even more.

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spectrum (charter + twc)

what fresh hell will this be?

 

Satan is already licking his chops at fresh opportunities. Maybe they'll recruit some of Verizon's HR people to demoralize the installers, repair teams etc even more.

 

i wonder what will happen to all the folks who do the time warner work but who are not time warner employees.

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Why do companies that have names that describe what they do change them for names that don't?

 

That's a good question.

 

I suspect that the people who run those companies want grander sounding names that appeal to their egos. To them Verizon sounds much more important than New York Telephone.

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  • 4 months later...

so, my twc bill arrives today and with no prior notice the monthly charges are $45 higher than last month taking the bill from $207 to $252.

 

i call and tussle a bit with them over the package components, reminding them that fios is offering me a $450 giftcard and a cheaper monthly rate for basically the same package, so they need to reassemble my package to cost the same or less, for the same or better services or i'm going to quit them, today.

i never had to deal with the retention dept on this call so, there's probably a lower cost package available for all the same stuff.

 

my new monthly bill will be $190 including 100mbps faster internet (it'll actually be just as slow as ever) 2 additional movie channels and i gave up cinemax. but mostly i'm pleased to have faster pretend internet and an overall bill that's $20 less a month.

 

it's crazy to have to do this every few months

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Yes, it's surreal.

 

splinky, wouldn't it be more cost effective to just pay for internet and watch what you need via Amazon/Netflix/Hulu/Direct? Then you don't need to talk to twc ever again.

it would and that's been plan for quite some time. i never seem to get around to pulling the trigger. i have amazon, netflix and hulu. maybe it's time. Ori, who is the best provider available in nyc for just internet?

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According to a recent article in the Times if you've got broad viewing habits then putting the individual pieces together can be pricey.

The Definitive Guide to Cord-Cutting in 2016, Based on Your Habits

Why Cord-Cutting Still Isn’t Perfect

There are still downsides to cord-cutting. J.D. Power & Associates, a research firm that collects feedback on brands and products from consumers, said customer satisfaction scores were highest among “cord stackers” — people with traditional TV packages who also subscribed to online video services. What made cord cutters less satisfied were two factors: customer care and value, according to J.D. Power.

For customer care, cord cutters may run into problems more often than traditional TV subscribers, said Kirk Parsons, a senior director of telecommunications research at J.D. Power. The streaming content provider may be experiencing issues. For example, this month, Netflix suffered a failure after the release of the new show “Luke Cage.” Your Wi-Fi connection might be spotty, or your internet provider may be experiencing issues. It’s tough to tell.

For value, cutting the cord isn’t very cheap if you then subscribe to multiple services to gain access to a diverse set of content. For cable subscribers, paying one bill is less of a hassle than juggling multiple bills. And even after you subscribe to multiple streaming services, there is still some content that you may miss out on because it is available only via cable or satellite, like some TV shows or live sports events.

“I would love to have the ability to pick and choose what I want as opposed to having four different services,” Mr. Parsons said. “I think we’ll get there, but right now it’s frustrating for consumers to get what they want.”


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You may also want to watch over-the-air broadcast channels, especially for N.F.L. games. Most televisions have an over-the-air tuner built-in, so you will be able to get your local major networks (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) using your existing TV hardware and an inexpensive antenna, such as the Antennas Direct ClearStream Eclipse ($40).

Do people do this? Does it work effectively?

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A lot of the alternative services appear very attractive but they are often less than what they seem. For example I toyed with the idea of dropping HBO and Starz in favor of Netflix. "After all," I thought, "Netflix has everything."

 

Unfortunately, they don't. And some of the things they do have like "Bridge of Spies" are only available on DVD, not streaming.

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You may also want to watch over-the-air broadcast channels, especially for N.F.L. games. Most televisions have an over-the-air tuner built-in, so you will be able to get your local major networks (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) using your existing TV hardware and an inexpensive antenna, such as the Antennas Direct ClearStream Eclipse ($40).

Do people do this? Does it work effectively?
we use an antenna to watch football (and the debates I guess) and it works fine. I bought a cheap one at first and it didn't really work so I got a bigger one with a signal booster and it gets all the networks, the channel that shows the monday night games when ny teams are playing, and dozens of others we never use. it's not even in the window at the new place and it still works.

 

we have netflix streaming, prime, a netflix dvd subscription, and the tv is attached to a computer and we have access to all the content we could ever want.

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