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The King's Speech


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Queen Elizabeth, the queen mother, had a long reputation as being a stickler for royal etiquette and prerogative. I was a little surprised when the movie portrayed her as just another housewife (with a tiara, of course). Dropping in for a cup of tea, etc.

 

Her interest in maintaining the dignity of the royals was widely viewed as a stumbling block both to the proposed marriage of Charles and Camilla in the 1970s, and to Diana's repeated flouting of the royal protocols.

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I thought I would like it more, given the press. Colin Firth was indeed excellent, but the Churchill parody annoyed me, and I wasn't thrilled with the portrayals of David and Wallace -- were they really that vapid. Also, I too was surprised by the relaxed portrayal of the queen. My British history is weak, but it didn't strike me as authentic.

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and I wasn't thrilled with the portrayals of David and Wallace -- were they really that vapid.

 

Haven't seen the movie, but from everything I've read about them, they seem pretty damned vapid.

 

Yes. Neither of them would ever be described as the sharpest tack in the drawer. But, she had a heck of a jewelry trunk. Sotheby's drew about 30 million pounds for the lot in 1987.

 

Jewelry Catalog and pictures

 

A narrative on some of their commemorative jewelry

 

A diamond for every occasion

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certainly, anything can be justified as "it was what it was and not something else". as i've said it could have remained exactly the movie it was about overcoming the speech impediment while being a little more complex/nuanced about history.

 

yes, it's a good thing that it didn't play the stammer for laughs or show logue having the king over for a barbie. it certainly could have been worse. it could also have been better.

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It was the rather pornographic way that it gratified English class fantasies that repelled me.

 

I must have seen a different movie. I thought it was a critique of those fantasies, partly from the viewpoint of Rush's character, partly through the almost literal stranglehold upbringing and expectations placed on the guy forced to play the role of the strong, confident, imperturbable leader.

 

Queen Elizabeth, the queen mother, had a long reputation as being a stickler for royal etiquette and prerogative. I was a little surprised when the movie portrayed her as just another housewife (with a tiara, of course). Dropping in for a cup of tea, etc.

 

But in scene after scene she displays her insistence on trivial details of etiquette and her great discomfort with the situation. ("Your Royal Highness the first time, then Ma'am as in ham, not Ma'am as in palm..." - from memory). I thought HBC did the tight-lipped charm thing wonderfully.

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I wasn't thrilled with the portrayals of David and Wallace -- were they really that vapid.

 

As for the Duke -- well, [i am] permanently susceptible to the charms of the born bore, to which time had added to this peculiar lust of mine an equal passion for the deeply stupid. David... always had something of such riveting stupidity to say that I clung to his words like the most avid courtier of the ancien regime. The Duke described coronations -- not that he had ever seen one, either: He had missed his own. I remarked that much of Westminster Abbey's ritural was Byzantine in origin. The word Byzantine was not seared in his memory. I quickly moved on to the sic transit gloria mundi moment, when two masons appear and ask the newly crowned king for instructions on the design of his tomb. "Masons? Masons! Yes. You one? I'm one.

 

Gore Vidal, Palimpsest.

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I wasn't thrilled with the portrayals of David and Wallace -- were they really that vapid.

 

As for the Duke -- well, [i am] permanently susceptible to the charms of the born bore, to which time had added to this peculiar lust of mine an equal passion for the deeply stupid. David... always had something of such riveting stupidity to say that I clung to his words like the most avid courtier of the ancien regime. The Duke described coronations -- not that he had ever seen one, either: He had missed his own. I remarked that much of Westminster Abbey's ritural was Byzantine in origin. The word Byzantine was not seared in his memory. I quickly moved on to the sic transit gloria mundi moment, when two masons appear and ask the newly crowned king for instructions on the design of his tomb. "Masons? Masons! Yes. You one? I'm one.

 

Gore Vidal, Palimpsest.

i will cry when gore dies.

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It was the rather pornographic way that it gratified English class fantasies that repelled me.

 

I must have seen a different movie. I thought it was a critique of those fantasies, partly from the viewpoint of Rush's character, partly through the almost literal stranglehold upbringing and expectations placed on the guy forced to play the role of the strong, confident, imperturbable leader.

 

Queen Elizabeth, the queen mother, had a long reputation as being a stickler for royal etiquette and prerogative. I was a little surprised when the movie portrayed her as just another housewife (with a tiara, of course). Dropping in for a cup of tea, etc.

 

But in scene after scene she displays her insistence on trivial details of etiquette and her great discomfort with the situation. ("Your Royal Highness the first time, then Ma'am as in ham, not Ma'am as in palm..." - from memory).

 

And the line, said rather indignantly, "I don't have a 'hubby.'"

 

I definitely got the sense, from her bearing, clothing, words, etc., that she was being portrayed as a very dignified woman. And, as Wilfrid says, uncomfortable with the intimacy of the situation. But if you assume she loved and cared for her husband, which it certainly appears that she did, she would have had to make certain...um...allowances for the overly familiar behavior of the colonial that was helping him.

 

It's also probably good to remember that some license is bound to be taken, given that this is a movie focusing on the stuttering and the friendship, and not an in-depth documentary examining the politics of the time.

 

However, it just so happens that I know for a fact that given certain circumstances, she could be charmingly informal.

 

During WWII, my father was the captain of a B-17 "Flying Fortress" stationed at Bassingbourn, England. During one bombing run over Nazi Germany, flack tore through his cockpit, badly ripping his left arm. He was sent to hospital where he was in a large sick bay with other wounded Americans. One fellow named Traynor had also been sitting in an airplane cockpit when flack came through. As luck would have it, the flack shot through his airplane seat, catching the seat on fire and searing his buttocks. Of course, all of the other airmen in the ward teased him repeatedly about the undignified location of his wound, which meant that basically all he could do was to lie on his stomach and wait for his bum to heal.

 

One day the Queen made a visit to the hospital in order to express her concern and gratitude.

 

She went from bed to bed, inspecting wounds, and chatting with the patients. As she neared Traynor's bed, the men began to yell and jeer, "Show the Queen your scar, Traynor. Show the Queen your scar!"

 

It was immediately apparent that she had been briefed regarding the men and their injuries and what to expect when she promptly responded, "Do you Yanks really think I've never seen an arse before?"

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It was the rather pornographic way that it gratified English class fantasies that repelled me.

 

I must have seen a different movie. I thought it was a critique of those fantasies, partly from the viewpoint of Rush's character, partly through the almost literal stranglehold upbringing and expectations placed on the guy forced to play the role of the strong, confident, imperturbable leader.

 

 

To be clear, I don't mean by "class fantasies" that the class system is a fantasy or was then; it is still in rude health. I mean the fantasies of being suddenly,

not raised in your social position, but enveloped or bathed in upper-class-ness. A good analogy is the way that comic-book movies gratify the power fantasies of adolescent boys. I don't see any critique of these fantasies, rather the contrary. Rush's character is rejected (as an actor) on the grounds of his colonial upbringing, and then is very successful because of his association with the Royal family.

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It was immediately apparent that she had been briefed regarding the men and their injuries and what to expect when she promptly responded, "Do you Yanks really think I've never seen an arse before?"

 

I believe it, and I really thought HBC - however she managed it - got the character absolutely right.

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It was the rather pornographic way that it gratified English class fantasies that repelled me.

 

I must have seen a different movie. I thought it was a critique of those fantasies, partly from the viewpoint of Rush's character, partly through the almost literal stranglehold upbringing and expectations placed on the guy forced to play the role of the strong, confident, imperturbable leader.

 

 

To be clear, I don't mean by "class fantasies" that the class system is a fantasy or was then; it is still in rude health. I mean the fantasies of being suddenly,

not raised in your social position, but enveloped or bathed in upper-class-ness. A good analogy is the way that comic-book movies gratify the power fantasies of adolescent boys. I don't see any critique of these fantasies, rather the contrary. Rush's character is rejected (as an actor) on the grounds of his colonial upbringing, and then is very successful because of his association with the Royal family.

maybe because it's an accurate portrayal?

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