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So next Tuesday I'm taking some Gullible Young Woman to see Karol Armitage at the Joyce.   For dinner after, I'm thinking of two places: Aldea and La Luncheonette.   Aldea, obviously, is one of t

This is awesome.

If you need to put on music for the right mood, .

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It's the new hotness in Rideshare services: http://ridewithvia.com/

 

I don't see how their business model could possibly make sense given the number of times I've gotten a Suburban to myself, but, whatever – that's a problem for their backers, not me.

 

I imagine they're the reason why uberPOOL is running $5 flat rates in Manhattan now from 7–10 AM and 5–8 PM on weekdays.

 

If you sign up via a referral code, you (and the person whose referral code you used) get $10 in credit.

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1. Their hours are ridiculously limited. Who ever goes home before midnight?

2. I don't see anything about TransitChek on their website, so I can't determine if they'll accept my yearly unlimited (I have doubts).

3. At least in Brooklyn, where distances are vast, shared rides are, like, horrible.

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1/3. Well, yeah, it's aimed more at commuters. Their business model appears to be offering flat-rate shared rides in core areas; it doesn't extend to all of Brooklyn or 24/7 service – I'd be more skeptical of their business model if so. But a $5 ride to work is really tempting...

2. Their site says this at the bottom:

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Oh, I see. Well, the acceptance of an employee-benefit TransitChek is great -- but the relegation to a six-seat cab isn't. (Actually, I don't really see how an unlimited TransitChek could work on this, but that doesn't matter cuz . . . )

 

For my personal needs, commuting by cab could NEVER be faster than taking the subway (driving over the bridge during rush hour takes more time than going underground almost by definition). I'd need it to get back and forth to Williamsburg, for which it seems not that useful (again just to me personally).

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That "seating six or more" thing just means you always get a Suburban or equivalent. I do not have commuter benefits, and I've gotten an SUV the vast majority of times – they have very few sedans in their fleet for whatever reason.

 

For me, I've replaced almost all of my Uber usage with Via usage when possible, but of course I'm in Manhattan, so there's that.

 

To go back to the original point, though, given that these restaurants seem to mostly target the young professional class that use Uber or equivalents even when they're slower, I think that the rise of these glorified jitney services could do a lot to mitigate the loss of the L, for certain kinds of businesses.

 

Of course, they're horrible for the city more broadly, but whatever.

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Given how crowded the L train is, certainly not – but some combination of that (with good occupancy in large SUVs) plus bus service (hopefully with a dedicated lane) plus ferries...

 

I think Manhattan/Williamsburg traffic going to zero is unlikely. Of course it will drop.

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Given how crowded the L train is, certainly not – but some combination of that (with good occupancy in large SUVs) plus bus service (hopefully with a dedicated lane) plus ferries...

 

I think Manhattan/Williamsburg traffic going to zero is unlikely. Of course it will drop.

 

When hurricane Sandy first closed the East river tunnels* from downtown Brooklyn to lower Manhattan the city organized a massive bus shuttle from Barclay's center to Wall street. It was a joke. Think about it - each bus holds as much as a single subway car. To replace a 10 car train takes 10 buses. And you can run a full train every 5 to 7 minutes. It's impossible to run that many buses in that short an interval. It just doesn't scale.

 

The weekday commute will get really ugly. On weekends things like Uber and buses could be helpful.

 

* The long term tunnel closure occurred later with the R train. Luckily there was redundant subway coverage which easily absorbed the spillover.

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Ferries, whoa. I am just reflecting on these suggestions as someone who uses the L train regularly.

 

I don't think anyone is suggesting it will drop to anything like zero, but what are we talking about? Five percent? Ten percent? Twenty percent?

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Given how crowded the L train is, certainly not – but some combination of that (with good occupancy in large SUVs) plus bus service (hopefully with a dedicated lane) plus ferries...

 

I think Manhattan/Williamsburg traffic going to zero is unlikely. Of course it will drop.

 

When hurricane Sandy first closed the East river tunnels* from downtown Brooklyn to lower Manhattan the city organized a massive bus shuttle from Barclay's center to Wall street. It was a joke. Think about it - each bus holds as much as a single subway car. To replace a 10 car train takes 10 buses. And you can run a full train every 5 to 7 minutes. It's impossible to run that many buses in that short an interval. It just doesn't scale.

 

The weekday commute will get really ugly. On weekends things like Uber and buses could be helpful.

 

* The long term tunnel closure occurred later with the R train. Luckily there was redundant subway coverage which easily absorbed the spillover.

 

 

Right. The lines for buses doing that route out of Manhattan were tragic. Wrapped around multiple city blocks, and heavily policed.

 

 

The weekday commute will get really ugly.

 

 

People who need to commute will move, if they can, before this happens. It would be crazy not to.

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Yup and SUVs are even worse than buses. This is also why the excitement over BRT (and bikesharing for that matter) needs to be mitigated because they simply don't move the same number of people as proper subways.

 

I don't know – take a typical Williamsburg restaurant, the kind we'd care about. What percentage of the patrons that came from Manhattan do you estimate took a cab or an Uber there?

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