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Even if you request "The Parlour", you may still be seated in "The Atrium", unless you object. Based on my experience, I think that if the restaurant thinks that you know no better, they will "put" you in The Atrium. At least for dinner, The Parlour seems to be, and is for me, the more coveted choice. I think they know this to be true.

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NoMad opened to the public on Monday, March 26th. My blog post is about our "Friends & Family" dinner.

Can I cook my food too?

I dined at the bar at the NoMad last fall (I think it was a Saturday night) and the place was like a mosh pit. Nice food though.

Even if you request "The Parlour", you may still be seated in "The Atrium", unless you object. Based on my experience, I think that if the restaurant thinks that you know no better, they will "put" you in The Atrium. At least for dinner, The Parlour seems to be, and is for me, the more coveted choice. I think they know this to be true.

 

That's what I thought too, its what makes - but then they chose to seat people that they then comp food to in the atrium (as oakapple and sneak were both "spotted" as it were) and I thought roz mentioned they sat her there until she requested to be sat in the parlor. But yeah, it would seem to make sense that the parlor is the more coveted space. In my case, if I'm eating with someone younger, or on a date, I would prefer the atrium. With older company (say my dad) I would prefer the parlor. Both are quite great, and both miles beyond the little corridor with 2 tables outside the fireplace area - those definitely looked quite sad.

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We have always been seated in The Parlour for dinner without having to request it because they know the Atrium would be way too uncomfortable, i.e. noisy, for me at night. However, we have sat in the Atrium for weekend lunch/brunch during the period when they were not using The Palour for those meals. Fine with me as it isn't noisy like at night. Plus, the light during the day via the skylight is spectacular! Towards the end of last year, they began using The Parlour during brunch. We've only been there for brunch once after that change, and we were asked where we wanted to sit. We were with our daughter and son-in-law, and they preferred The Parlour.

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  • 3 months later...

I don't altogether understand 'Tips for Jesus' — I thought the idea was to tip the single-mother waitress at Applebee's four figures so she could afford Christmas for her family. When I dined at The NoMad last month, my captain had read philosophy at Chicago, and my sommelier was a former Broadway showgirl. I seem to dine at restaurants where my 'servers' are better educated, better paid, and better looking than I am. [The last point particularly rankles.]

 

Of course, I presume the gratuity will enter the tip pool and go to benefit a lot of behind-the-scenes staff who are less glamourous or well remunerated than the front-of-house figures I interact with...

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Aren't servers typically better looking than the rest of us? They're mostly sub 30 people who have the sorts of other jobs that are for the good looking. Not to mention that being cute gets you better tips...

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I'm not altogether certain why I feel this, but for some reason I believe it's socially acceptable for beautiful people to consort with persons more sophisticated, upper classier, etc than they. [Compare, on the other hand, most cultures' portrayals of the self-made nouveaux riches when attempting to socialise with their betters...]

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I don't altogether understand 'Tips for Jesus' — I thought the idea was to tip the single-mother waitress at Applebee's four figures so she could afford Christmas for her family. When I dined at The NoMad last month, my captain had read philosophy at Chicago, and my sommelier was a former Broadway showgirl. I seem to dine at restaurants where my 'servers' are better educated, better paid, and better looking than I am. [The last point particularly rankles.]

 

Of course, I presume the gratuity will enter the tip pool and go to benefit a lot of behind-the-scenes staff who are less glamourous or well remunerated than the front-of-house figures I interact with...

 

Generally, no, the back-of-house staff is not included in the tip pool. Maybe that's changed since I was there a dozen years ago, but I doubt it. And I believe there have been court cases about managers on salary illegally taking from the pool for the tipped staff.

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Them, yes. They are front-of-house. I thought by "behind-the-scenes staff" you meant the staff who are truly out of sight -- the cooks and prep people. Well, yeah, some of them are seen if it's an open kitchen, but they're not SEEN exactly; usually no interaction with the customers. I always loved it, when I was working the antipasto section at Zeppole, when customers would slip me something as a thank-you for making selections for them. You can be sure I never told anyone anything about it.

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  • 2 months later...

I had a very mixed experience here last night, which I would characterize as mostly good at the table and dreadful in the bar. Perhaps because of the snow or the fact that it was Sunday night the bar was not the insanely crowded scene it usually is when I have visited. But service was in the weeds. Three of us had drinks, 2 would sit down to dinner later. Much later as it transpired. After several atttempts to catch the eye of the expert-at-avoiding-eye-contact-or-hearing-someone-say-excuse-me cocktail waitress, and at least 20 minutes into our sojourn at one of the standing tables, one of my exasperated companions approached a hostess and asked for help. She apologized and eventually, a good ten-plus minutes later, someone appeared and took our order. When one of our party wanted a second drink he wisely decided to order from the bar, from a bartender he said he had a pleasant interaction with. So it was pretty discouraging to watch the friendly bartender and two of his colleagues huddle together behind the bar--are they having a meeting? I wondered--chatting away while my friend's martini failed to appear. He finally, after another 20 or so minutes, approached the bar again. The bartender had completely forgotten about the order. He did have the good grace to comp the drink. Getting the check took another glacial wait and once again we had to appeal to the hostess to get the job done. I should note the drinks themselves were great. I had a Martinez which was pitch-perfect, and I tasted something called (I think) a Start Me Up which was delicious.

 

Finally at table, we ordered the insanely good chicken liver terrine to start. It is just so good. I had the egg and risotto, and the duck, and both were superb. The duck was so tender and perfectly medium rare. My friend's beef was also excellent, but we both thought the cold-smoked foie gras a misguided dish. It was too assertively flavored for such a large portion, and we agreed that while two bites of it in a tasting menu would work it quicky palled. We had two half bottles of wine, a Hermann Wiemer dry riesling and 2011 Chateauneuf du Pape, Clos des Brusqieres, which the sommelier wisely decanted as soon as it was ordered. It really had opened up nicely by the time we were ready to drink it. Service at table was generally excellent and cordial but my friend was a bit disappointed that we were not given the mignardises we observed going to other tables. But we had been in the place so long by then--about four hours due to the bar portion of the evening involving over an hour and a half to order, drink and pay for one round of cocktails and one drink then ordered at the bar--that we said the hell with it and left.

 

I would note that we both thought it a very good value: $220 before tip for the terrine, 2 starters, 2 mains, 2 half bottles of wine.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Holy shit.

 

I was so stupified by the Times trend piece about monacles (can it not be self-parody?) that I somehow missed this tidbit at the end:

 

And At NoMad, a clubby restaurant in Manhattan, a monocle is offered to customers who complain that they can’t read the menu in dim light.

It all has to be a joke, right? Was yesterday April 1?

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I too somehow missed the last paragaph on my first read. I have never been offered a monocle at The NoMad.

 

Spent some time trying to interpret the adjective 'clubby' in this context...

 

Am much more interested in the bespoke tweed and brass telescopes: where is that trend piece?

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