Jump to content

More skepticism about blind tasting


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 99
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I mean its what my wife does for a living. Companies definitely do things like this out of sentimentality. The only thing they've trained them is to give names to things, and really I'm not convinced

It went from being a funky flavorful rustic wine to be being a big smooth fruitbomb.   ETA -- This is the wineboard.

On the "it's all bullshit" point of view:

 

http://io9.com/wine-tasting-is-bullshit-heres-why-496098276

 

And a retort from among other people Barry Smith

http://www.newappsblog.com/2013/05/is-wine-really-a-matter-of-taste-ht-to-barry-smith.html

 

I have been going intermittently to Barry Smith's Experimental Oenology Seminars in London which are frequently very interesting.

Hour long talk by a psychologist philosopher or oenologist -- then some wine related experiment -- then some tasting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it's bullshit at all. If you went to UC Davis and took Ann Noble's class, you would come out of it with a common vocabulary that you could use to communicate with your fellow graduates, pace all the usual caveats about sensation. If you are in a Gallo lab in Modesto, I bet there is a rigorous common vocabulary. But i think the utility there is commercial product design, not enjoyment.

 

and it has zip to do with whether that is "melted liquorice" or "roasted purple plums" in Parker's review.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, commercial enterprises have tasting panels with rigorous methodologies and vocabularies.

 

And hey, I remember Barry Smith.

 

But mainly, you guys were right, the violet candy wine was the California Cab, Arnot-Roberts Clajeux, 2007. Of course, we didn't know there was a Cali Cab in the tasting. I rated it highly, which came as a surprise when I found out what it was.

 

The Aglianico was the other wine which stood out to me as strange, but now I see that it was a heavy molasses/rubber aftertaste.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think it's bullshit at all. If you went to UC Davis and took Ann Noble's class, you would come out of it with a common vocabulary that you could use to communicate with your fellow graduates, pace all the usual caveats about sensation. If you are in a Gallo lab in Modesto, I bet there is a rigorous common vocabulary. But i think the utility there is commercial product design, not enjoyment.

 

and it has zip to do with whether that is "melted liquorice" or "roasted purple plums" in Parker's review.

 

I agree with all this -- but for the man in the street, there contact with blind tasting is through the sort of tasting notes that are in newspapers or in wine merchants, and not the ones that have some validity. So from their perspective it is bullshit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think it's bullshit at all. If you went to UC Davis and took Ann Noble's class, you would come out of it with a common vocabulary that you could use to communicate with your fellow graduates, pace all the usual caveats about sensation. If you are in a Gallo lab in Modesto, I bet there is a rigorous common vocabulary. But i think the utility there is commercial product design, not enjoyment.

 

and it has zip to do with whether that is "melted liquorice" or "roasted purple plums" in Parker's review.

 

I agree with all this -- but for the man in the street, there contact with blind tasting is through the sort of tasting notes that are in newspapers or in wine merchants, and not the ones that have some validity. So from their perspective it is bullshit.

Oh, and I think they're right.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

Whatever you feel about blind tastings, I urge you to book a seat at this season's sherry tasting at instituto cervantes. You may decide that you don't like sherry, but (1) you'll know you've tried the best of them. (2) it's dirt cheap for what you're tasting.

 

p.s. I think it's not even blind.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Blind tasting of Priorats and Chateauneufs last night, all from 2007 (Parker's "vintage of a lifetime" for Chateauneufs).

 

Nothing was ready for prime time. But it was interesting as a blind tasting: I've never seen such disparate scores, for the most part. The top Priorats in the tasting were loved by some, hated by others. Beaucastel doggedly made it to the top three. The winner was a $25 Priorat (and there were plenty of three figure wines in the set). The startling result was a mediocre $15 bottle sitting in the middle of the final rankings.

 

Thirteen tasters, wide range of experience, including three Spanish, no French (if it matters).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...