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I can think of exceptions, like referring to a junction ("Bowery and Rivington"), or--as Stephanie says--an address (122 Bowery). But otherwise, I think you're hard put to find it used without the definite article.

 

Anyway, the Elephant and Castle.

 

By the way, the Obrist profile I was reading when I lodged that complaint is wonderfully weird. Did the writer intend Obrist to come across as a borderline-autistic, hyperactive idiot, who artists barely tolerate? Because that's the overwhelming effect of the piece.

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I meant to make a laudatory post last week to the effect that, where other than The New Yorker might you find a smart, funny, informative article on a literary figure as obscure as Alfred Lord Dunsany

I took that test when we applied to adopt! Picture was from the 30's: any idiot could tell that you were supposed to translate the stallion and the shirtless man in the picture into something sexual.

Mitchell is right on this precise point, though: as a classical music fan, I find its use in classical venues to be an outrage.

It's no big deal, but if you're from London, it's like reading "The most successful pop group to emerge in the 1960s were Beatles."

Wince inducing.

 

(And yes, it's the reference to the place, not some restaurant, which makes it odd.)

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It's no big deal, but if you're from London, it's like reading "The most successful pop group to emerge in the 1960s were Beatles."

 

Wince inducing.

 

(And yes, it's the reference to the place, not some restaurant, which makes it odd.)

Apparently, you mean musically, not financially?

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A Bowery bum or "head south on Third until you get to "Bleeker and Bowery"". That's what I recall from whence I lived there in the early 70s.

 

As I recall "The" Bowery was most often used to describe a neighborhood (albeit a narrow one) replete with cheap hotels, cheap resto supply places and dregs of humanity. Used with the article much the same as one would use "The" Lower East Side" My dad worked at the men's shelter on 3rd st and Bowery. I most recall no problem with dropping the definite article when describing the street itself (He lives on 2nd and Bowery). Though terms such as "down on The Bowery" were very common. Or "I'm headed to the Bowery to see a show at CBGBs"

 

Context I suppose.

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