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I seem to have been angered by the article from the first few paras. I'm sure Clark may be doing interesting things; but they can't be holding that the mind extends beyond the skull/skin, or that he engages with sciences, or the stuff about tools, none of which are remotely uncommon views or practices.

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I meant to make a laudatory post last week to the effect that, where other than The New Yorker might you find a smart, funny, informative article on a literary figure as obscure as Alfred Lord Dunsany

I took that test when we applied to adopt! Picture was from the 30's: any idiot could tell that you were supposed to translate the stallion and the shirtless man in the picture into something sexual.

Mitchell is right on this precise point, though: as a classical music fan, I find its use in classical venues to be an outrage.

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Completely stuck on paragraph three of Rebecca Mead's article on the Faroe Islands, in which she seems to suggest lumber is necessary to the manufacture of salt.

 

The more I read it the less I understand it. Am I missing something?

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There must be enough pieces now for a "New Yorker Book of Weird Chefs in Weird Places."

 

I think the fact that Koks is situated on a bog and surrounded by mud confirms Peter Cook as a seer. He would also have enjoyed the name.

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Meanwhile, same issue. I guess Seabrook's Talk piece about Richard Thompson was edited, but why the rather nasty exchange about Spalding Gray at the end? How many tutors did he have on the esoteric topic of combining bagpipe drone with jazz harmonics (Les Paul "among others")? And an informed editor might have charitably excised the comment about "brand names" in British popular music lyrics, knowing that British radio would have instantly banned the songs. That's why the Kinks sing about "cherry cola" in "Lola," and why "Kodachrome" got no airplay in the U.K. despite S&G's immense popularity.

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