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Mighty Quinn's (East Village BBQ)


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That's like coming up with a fantasy deli list. Mine used to be tongue from 2nd Avenue, hard salami from Katz's, corned beef from Stage, and pastrami from Carnegie. But that was years ago, before we could get smoked meat (or rather, before some of us could get smoked meat), and obviously only limited to Manhattan.

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What's this called? The old jew?   http://www.pinkpignyc.com/.a/6a00d8341c714d53ef017c34ed08c0970b-800wi

I tried to "like" this post, but the button won't let you push itself.

(It strikes me as tempting fate to name a barbecue joint after a song whose best line is, "Just ain't my cup of meat.")

Went here tonight. I understand why certain posters are infuriated that MQ received 2 stars. This is not a 2 star restaurant, no matter what star system you are operating under. This is by no means the best barbecue restaurant in NYC, nor would this be a very special barbecue restaurant outside of NYC. 1 star.

 

The brisket is. . .interesting. I agree with the poster up thread, whoever that was, who said that the brisket is low on smoke. The smoke is fainter than an aftertaste. It appears as the barest suggestion of a fragrance. Boo. I thought that the brisket tasted like my grandmother's roast with a strange tasting fatty crust. They're going for the Tx style "sugar cookie" but it has kind of an acrid flavor and a gelatinous texture. The meat itself has a distinct crumbly and fibrous texture that I associate with a Friday night roast. Basically, this is not especially well cooked brisket. I understand that they may be having quality control issues due to the sudden increase in volume. An Il Buco Alimentari effect. But no real excuse in my book. (Also, why no white bread??)

 

The sweet potatoes are decent. They taste like a dish that annoying person always brings to a Thanksgiving potluck, the gal or guy who has a few back issues of Gourmet saved away. The menu item itself reads like a bad Gourmet-era recipe, and it's really mediocre-plus home cooking.

 

The beans are bad, could have come out of a can. Oh RUB, how I miss you.

 

Atmosphere: generic east village. Enormous line, moved very quickly. The price is right. BrisketTown is serving a much better product.

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Went here tonight. I understand why certain posters are infuriated that MQ received 2 stars. This is not a 2 star restaurant, no matter what star system you are operating under. This is by no means the best barbecue restaurant in NYC, nor would this be a very special barbecue restaurant outside of NYC. 1 star.

 

The brisket is. . .interesting. I agree with the poster up thread, whoever that was, who said that the brisket is low on smoke. The smoke is fainter than an aftertaste. It appears as the barest suggestion of a fragrance. Boo. I thought that the brisket tasted like my grandmother's roast with a strange tasting fatty crust. They're going for the Tx style "sugar cookie" but it has kind of an acrid flavor and a gelatinous texture. The meat itself has a distinct crumbly and fibrous texture that I associate with a Friday night roast. Basically, this is not especially well cooked brisket. I understand that they may be having quality control issues due to the sudden increase in volume. An Il Buco Alimentari effect.

 

But no real excuse in my book.

 

(Also, why no white bread??)

 

The sweet potatoes are decent. They taste like a dish that annoying person always brings to a Thanksgiving potluck, the gal or guy who has a few back issues of Gourmet saved away. The menu item itself reads like a bad Gourmet-era recipe, and it's really mediocre-plus home cooking.

 

The beans are bad, could have come out of a can. Oh RUB, how I miss you.

 

Atmosphere: generic east village. Enormous line, moved very quickly. The price is right. BrisketTown is serving a much better product.

Maybe not if they managed to install a few more smokers overnight. But I'm one that believes "supply and demand" can also exist in the restaurant industry. Along with human error that comes along with it.

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as with most legitimate bbq restaurants, they should only produce as much meat as they can produce while maintaining quality levels. a good bbq restaurant does not and cannot meet virtually unlimited levels of demand. i spoke to someone at mq who told me they ramped up production significantly this week to meet demand. if quality falls subsequently, i see that as greed, not as human error.

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I think BBQ has some inherent fluctuations in quality. Mighty Quinn has large plastic bins of rub, which I'm assuming they mix themselves (maybe they buy pre-mixed in bulk). It's certainly possible that some mixes have unbalanced proportions, or perhaps the blend isn't mixed well so some briskets get too much sugar or salt.
I don't recall thinking that the brisket was undersmoked or over sweet. Although a few years back, I switched my own brisket rub from a house-mixed "spicy" blend to Texas BBQ Brisket Rub, which has a lot of turbonado sugar. It was too sweet for me, but people love it.

 

Was I the only one who got a handful of salt after the meat was plated and thought it was all too salty?

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i spoke to someone at mq who told me they ramped up production significantly this week to meet demand. if quality falls subsequently, i see that as greed, not as human error.

 

This is a place that never, in its wildest dreams, expected to get reviewed by Pete Wells, much less to get two stars. As you suggested, just like Il Buco A&V, they were not prepared for it. When you are struck with an unexpected problem (even a "good" problem), mistakes happen.

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(Also, why no white bread??)

Because white bread sucks? Really, it does.

 

Yes, I understand it's a tradition. So is green beer on St. Patrick's day. They both suck.

 

that analogy incomprehensible.

 

white bread isn't something I'd want to eat plain, on its own. but in the proper context, which includes the environment in which it's consumed, it makes sense. grilled cheese, peanut butter and jelly. and barbecue. (all juvenile foods according to orik.) white bread is not just a 'tradition,' it's an intrinsic part of the barbecue event that's inseparable from barbecue itself, or at least certain genera of barbecue.

 

(other forms of bread are permissible, like potato bread etc)

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white bread is not just a 'tradition,' it's an intrinsic part of the barbecue event that's inseparable from barbecue itself, or at least certain genera of barbecue.

 

(other forms of bread are permissible, like potato bread etc)

 

In other words, it's tradition. Besides the white bread do you have to drink crappy beer with BBQ?

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I think a bbq place could justifiably be criticized for not having some crappy beer on tap. Especially if you're serving on brown butcher's paper. It's the difference between a bbq place that's staying "true to its roots", i guess "vernacular", or something like Blue Smoke. You don't have to drink it, but it should be there.

 

ETA: Since it's Friday, I expect a 30-page discussion of the distinction between "mere tradition" v. "essential to the vernacular". Ready, set .... GO!

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