Jump to content

Recommended Posts

What is the proper tip on meals or bar tabs with comped items? (This is for comps that are NOT "compensation" for fuck ups)

 

i.e. if your bill was $50, but they comped you $15 worth of stuff, so it would have been $65, what do you tip? I am guessing a % of $65, most likely 20 - 25%, depending on how the rest of the service was.

 

Thoughts?

 

Aaron, I had a recent meal where what was ordered amounted to $50 worth of food but I was comped over $200 worth of food.

 

I tipped on $200.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 893
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Liz Johnson, Food Editor/blogger from the LoHud.com, here in Rockland County, posted an interesting comment / question on her facebook page this morning:     What are your predictions for the resta

(The difference being that a mandatory service charge still makes the employees' daily compensation dependent on the amount of business done each day. To my mind, under capitalism, that's a risk that

Burying the lede!

I agree. Include the comp in the total from which you calculate the tip.

 

A simple example: if I get buybacks in a bar, I make sure to tip on those drinks just as if I'd bought them. In fact, I tip more on buybacks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Guest Aaron T

Yet another tipping question. If I go out to lunch and towards the end of the meal order an additional meal 'to go" which is then brought to the table in a to go bag with the check, what if anything do I tip on the to go order. Assume the meal was $30 and the to go order was $20. I would usually tip ~$6 on the meal as that is my standard 20%. When ordering takeout at the counter I don't tip, as I feel the counterperson has not done anything tip worthy. But in this restaurant scenario, I feel like the waitress might feel stiffed if I tip as usual. I tipped the same $6 or so that I would have if I hadn't ordered takeout as the takeout portion of my order required no service. what do you or would you do in these types of scenarios?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yet another tipping question. If I go out to lunch and towards the end of the meal order an additional meal 'to go" which is then brought to the table in a to go bag with the check, what if anything do I tip on the to go order. Assume the meal was $30 and the to go order was $20. I would usually tip ~$6 on the meal as that is my standard 20%. When ordering takeout at the counter I don't tip, as I feel the counterperson has not done anything tip worthy. But in this restaurant scenario, I feel like the waitress might feel stiffed if I tip as usual. I tipped the same $6 or so that I would have if I hadn't ordered takeout as the takeout portion of my order required no service. what do you or would you do in these types of scenarios?

 

I'd tip as normal on the lunch order, and add 15% for the "delivered" to go order. If I paid separately for the to go portion, I'd give the waiter a few dollars for that

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
More controversy, this time at Craftbar.

 

If these suits keep happening, we may find restaurateurs moving to the Per Se model sooner rather than later. And a good thing all round.

 

Couldn't happen soon enough.

 

The restaurant industry creates its own problems. Lots of cash changes hands, some of the accounting and billing procedures are suspect, not everything goes into the formal books, etc. Unauthorized "comps", supplier discounts for cash, and other goodies abound.

 

A new restaurant by us has offered 50% off coupons for dinner, with a few twists that suggest they're watching the register. Maximum discount is $25, only one coupon per table, can't be used on Saturday night, the adjusted bill must be paid by credit card, coupon must be from the original newspaper, etc. I asked the manager about the credit card deal, and he said waitstaff were pocketing cash and inserting coupons for $25 when they settled up.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fucking rude arrogant Europeans acting like their way of life is the only one on the planet.

 

Whenever I travel overseas, I read up on the customs that prevail where I'm going so that I will at least have a shot at behaving with a modicum of civility. You'd hope that they might do something similar, but apparently not; they come over here in their outlandish garb bulging with Euros expecting everything to work like it does at home.

 

Here's a free piece of advice to Hans & Pierre: get a clue. We are New Yorkers and we can be as polite and kind as the next fellow, but push us too far and you're likely to find a scalding tureen of black truffle broth in your lap.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Eater and the NY Post note the rise of mandatory service charges added to bills in NY restaurants. By law, the charge may only be added for groups of eight or more, and may not exceed 15%, the article says.

 

There's a diversity of responses among the 19 posters at NY Post.com, split between people who think this is terrible, and others who see it as the only way for the staff to get a decent income from low-tipping Europeans

 

Later, Newyorkology checked in with the Dept. of Consumer affairs and confirmed the practice is illegal in almost all cases. It is only acceptable to add a service charge for a party of 8 or more, and it can be no more than 15%

 

La Gamin adds one

 

Newyorkology's report

 

The Post last week found a dozen restaurants foisting tips on diners - sometimes as high as 20 percent and regardless of party size and without noting the policy on the menu, all in violation of consumer laws.

 

"I felt cheated and taken advantage of," said Dazi Chen, who discovered a 20 percent tip stealthily added to his check at Midtown's Bombay Eats, where he dined with a friend.

 

"They're trying to get double gratuity," fumed Chen, 31.

 

When he complained to a waitress, he was told the tip is "programmed" into the cash register and could not be refunded.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As I noted in an Eater comment, I must have been caught by Le Gamin recently. Pity, because I was praising the burger on another thread here.

 

Agree with Thunk, of course, but it would never have occurred to me to look for a service charge in a place like that. I would have glanced at the total, paid and tipped.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

My Super is doing some work for me that doesn't fall under his scope of being a Super. I'm paying him $350 for it (his quote, a fair price I think). Do I need to tip him too? (Please say no, please say no.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
My Super is doing some work for me that doesn't fall under his scope of being a Super. I'm paying him $350 for it (his quote, a fair price I think). Do I need to tip him too? (Please say no, please say no.)

Supers work on the European model. Service is included.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...