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Sneakeater, at Untitled they are charging a la carte prices for dishes they tell you are somewhat-smaller main courses. Offered a la carte, of course. And the beat goes on. The one trick I haven't seen in the US is the French one of offering a few tasting menus, any one of which has to be for the all the convives while at the same time offering a token number of a la carte dishes at inflated prices; i.e. two appetizers and two main courses, designed to dissuade you from ordering them. There's a la carte and there's a la carte. I'm happy to pay a lot for dish that I can choose, is well-made and doesn't stint on ingredients.

 

Oh, of course. I was talking about real a la cart. Not what you have aptly called "a la carte tasting menus."

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Liz Johnson, Food Editor/blogger from the LoHud.com, here in Rockland County, posted an interesting comment / question on her facebook page this morning:     What are your predictions for the resta

(The difference being that a mandatory service charge still makes the employees' daily compensation dependent on the amount of business done each day. To my mind, under capitalism, that's a risk that

Burying the lede!

Do people in California still tip 20% since the state eliminated the "tipped minimum wage"? If they raise prices in NYC to compensate everyone fairly, are we still going to be expected to leave a tip?

 

Of course.

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Most places in Canada do not have tipping wages, and Canadians are still expected to tip 15-20%. In my province, minimum wage is $11/hr, and the average across Canada is $10.86/hr.

 

And the lowest tipping wage in Canada (in Quebec) is $9.05/hr. The average tipping wage is $9.69. (only four provinces have tipping wages--BC, AB, ON, QC)

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I decided to give my wife a night off in the food-preparation area. I went to the UES 2nd Ave. Deli and got a piece of gefilte fish, a matzoh ball soup, chicken in the pot and a piece of chocolate babka. I liked my young order-preparer a lot, besides which when I said to "make it nice" when it came to the chocolate babka,

he gave me a really big slice. When I took the shopping bag, I slipped him a couple of bucks and asked him his name for future reference. It's not that the 2nd Ave. Deli is anything like Unbridled or the Modern, but I felt that the chap at the deli deserved being made nice in return, besides which I am sure he will remember me the next time. So it wasn't completely altruistic, but it was also a transaction that gave us a momentary jolt of mutual appreciation. On a larger scale, I have on occasion given a few dollars or euros to someone who accommodated me in obtaining or table or made an extra effort. or showed some integrity, in deciding on a bottle of wine. Under Meyer's scheme, these nice small gestures of appreciation will be gone with the wind and also be another display of the all-to-common opaque and predatory nature of "restaurants of stature"

 

 

Nothing is to stop you from leaving a gratuity. The idea that tying a servers base minimum wage to pooled tips does nothing to improve service, provides offsetting negative incentives (table turning, up selling), and is unfair to servers. This is largely empirical.

 

The best way to compliment a server is to tell them or tell the manager. The reality is that they have no way of knowing if your 22% tip is a compliment or standard or if your 18% tip is a 2% drop from 20% or a 3% from 15%.

 

Adrian is right. You can always barge into the kitchen, demand to know which of the cooks prepared your meal, and stuff some bills into the pockets of their jackets. If the chef actually worked the stove and was responsible, you can put the money in his (or her) front pants pocket. Because remuneration of the unrecognized kitchen staff is what the change of policy is about.

 

 

 

 

(For those who can't tell, yes, I am being facetious.)

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I decided to give my wife a night off in the food-preparation area. I went to the UES 2nd Ave. Deli and got a piece of gefilte fish, a matzoh ball soup, chicken in the pot and a piece of chocolate babka. I liked my young order-preparer a lot, besides which when I said to "make it nice" when it came to the chocolate babka,

he gave me a really big slice. When I took the shopping bag, I slipped him a couple of bucks and asked him his name for future reference. It's not that the 2nd Ave. Deli is anything like Unbridled or the Modern, but I felt that the chap at the deli deserved being made nice in return, besides which I am sure he will remember me the next time. So it wasn't completely altruistic, but it was also a transaction that gave us a momentary jolt of mutual appreciation. On a larger scale, I have on occasion given a few dollars or euros to someone who accommodated me in obtaining or table or made an extra effort. or showed some integrity, in deciding on a bottle of wine. Under Meyer's scheme, these nice small gestures of appreciation will be gone with the wind and also be another display of the all-to-common opaque and predatory nature of "restaurants of stature"

 

Sounds to me more like an enjoyment of bribing people.

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Do people in California still tip 20% since the state eliminated the "tipped minimum wage"? If they raise prices in NYC to compensate everyone fairly, are we still going to be expected to leave a tip?

15-20%. Or a little more up to the next whole dollar.

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Tipping extra is often aposteriori. I often do it in a place (town or city or restaurant) I will never return to. A bribe is conditioned on someone doing something in the future. I admit, though, that doing it in the neighborhood to establish on-going extras down the road could be construed as a bribe.

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