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If you want the San Marcos things, you could go to the village but I'd think you'd need to be pretty motivated. The ladies were in the Juarez market in the clay section way in the back. At the very least, get a bunch of comales.

 

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Years ago I went and hunted for the black clay (not for cooking, so now it's of little interest to me), the painted wood and the Aguilar sisters' figurines. It was a lot of fun and a chance to get out of the center. And Monte Alban and Mitla are fascinating.

 

And I've said this before, but I can't think of anything more pleasant than sitting on the zocolo with a cold beer and a bowl of chillied peanuts watching the world go by.

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NYTimes has a guide to the city...     Travel section  

And I want to thank you for getting back with us and letting us know how it went.   All too often, folks give advice and recommendations and suggestions...   And then never hear nuttin'.   Fr

I'm not surprised. I think the whole Rancho Gordo thing is a scam. Mexico has pinto beans, black beans, and green beans. All these other things Rancho is selling are synthetic. Just wait.

...Itanoni, a cafe/tortilleria, is very close to my heart, so try that. Armado Ramirez Leyva might be around, ask for him: Belisario Domínguez 513, Col. Reforma. He's located and is growing regional native corns and making simple regional antojitos with the right corn variety using a re-worked verison of the beehive oven with a flat comal-like top, take a look: http://www.itanoni.com.mx/...

I am speechless with admiration. The website alone makes me want to hop on the bus for Oaxaca. This is absolutely gorgeous. Thanks for posting.

 

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(snip) with a cold beer and a bowl of chillied peanuts watching the world go by.

 

Nice pictures, Rancho.

 

Chillied peanuts sounds like an interesting snack. Any details you'd care to share?

 

I think they just saute raw peanuts with arbol chiles and the salt them and squeeze lime on them. One hurts but then you can't stop. And they bring them to you automatically when you order a beer.

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(snip) with a cold beer and a bowl of chillied peanuts watching the world go by.

 

Nice pictures, Rancho.

 

Chillied peanuts sounds like an interesting snack. Any details you'd care to share?

 

I think they just saute raw peanuts with arbol chiles and the salt them and squeeze lime on them. One hurts but then you can't stop. And they bring them to you automatically when you order a beer.

 

Chilied peanuts are also a popular bar snack throughout much of the southwest. They're fairly ubiquitous in Texas where they sell them even in the convenience stores. I'm sure you can find them online with very little effort if you're interested.

 

Or find some recipes to make them.

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(snip) with a cold beer and a bowl of chillied peanuts watching the world go by.

 

Nice pictures, Rancho.

 

Chillied peanuts sounds like an interesting snack. Any details you'd care to share?

 

I think they just saute raw peanuts with arbol chiles and the salt them and squeeze lime on them. One hurts but then you can't stop. And they bring them to you automatically when you order a beer.

 

except for the chilling and hot green chillies instead of dried red (plus some diced onion) this is also standard drinking accompaniment in north india.

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I'm not really sure what I want out of this trip except that we are both very tired and ready for a rest. We normally shy away from tourist areas and venture onto back streets if they seem safe. Street food is definitely something we'll do lots of, but we'll also work in a few nicer meals. And as for the cooking gadgets, there's nothing specific that I'm looking for, I just like to find things that I can use in unusual ways in my pastry work. I guess the other thing is that I've been cooking professionally for just a year so this is my first time away from the restaurant. That also means its my first time to get some casual professional development. The dream would be to befriend a local baker and have them take me in for a few days.

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About 10 years ago, I actually did that for my mother, may she rest in peace. She made her own bread--every kind of bread, every bit perfect--for nearly 30 years. When she visited me here in Mexico, I had arranged for her to meet and work for a day with a neighborhood baker. She spoke no Spanish; he spoke no English. By the end of their day together, they knew they were soul mates. I translated their long conversations about oven temperatures and humidity, flours, yeast and rise time, proofing, and on and on. The day she left for home, my mother went to tell him goodbye. They hugged and wept and had their picture taken. Their day together was a gift to both of them. Thanks for helping me remember it today.

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I'm coming in late to this but I read that you're not leaving until October, so maybe you'll check back.

I've heard that the very talented Reyna Mendoza, who used to teach and cook up at Casa Sagrada, is now working and teaching alongside Pilar Cabrera at Casa de los Sabores

Check it out. I will be.

You might also want to check for any excursions to a mezcal producer, or see what day classes from Susana Trilling at Seasons of My Heart on on offer.

I second the shout out for Itanoni. Stellar food and concept. And of course, the chilie peanuts rock. I always ask for extra ajo.

 

 

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oh, this thread makes me want to go back so badly. i loved everything about Oaxaca and the food was just fantastic. great markets, art galleries and vintage shops, too.

 

the tlayudas are great but be ready for a wait. and there will be a wait, the longer the later you go, esp. at Dona Martha, which was near where we were staying - cars line the entire block, people everywhere, lots of families. at least 45 min wait, possibly more. but we were not disappointed. and quite a scene to observe while you wait. (i think we may have gone after dinner so we were not starving while waiting, which definitely was a plus. otherwise, go early)

 

for something different, when you are looking for a restaurant - i liked Casa Oaxaca (the one next to an art gallery) a lot, we had a great al fresco lunch there, one of those experiences when time seems to stop and nothing else really matters, just the food, wine and sun. plus they make terrific mezcal cocktails at the bar.

 

oh, and if you are looking for chapulines (grasshopers), Casa de la Abuela overlooking the zocolo served good ones (better than at other places we tried in Oaxaca). also, nice view and a good stop for some mezcal and a snack mid-afternoon, we tried a few simple dishes, almost had the place to ourselves.

 

you'll have such a great time - enjoy!

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, I'm back. You can see the full write-up over at my blog, but here's a few highlights.

 

Yeah! I marched in my first communist parade

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and saw my share of ruins

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and sourced a lot of goodies for my café

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But really this was about the restaurants. Our favorites (not in order):

Biznaga who served me one hell of a plantain relleno

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and Itanoni who introduced me to the tetela

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And I'll just say that while it was a great time and a place I'd like to re-visit, I don't view it as an ultimate foodie destination like many. I like what folks are doing down there, and I see potential through the burgeoning organic and local foods movements, but they're in their adolescence right now and need some time to percolate without swine flu, major political unrest and a better economy.

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