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NYTimes has a guide to the city...     Travel section  

And I want to thank you for getting back with us and letting us know how it went.   All too often, folks give advice and recommendations and suggestions...   And then never hear nuttin'.   Fr

I'm not surprised. I think the whole Rancho Gordo thing is a scam. Mexico has pinto beans, black beans, and green beans. All these other things Rancho is selling are synthetic. Just wait.

I just received an email from my office announcing an early closing today owing to an impending major snowstorm.

 

Ha.

 

Ha ha ha.

 

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.

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You know what? All I've had so far are green beans.

I'm not surprised. I think the whole Rancho Gordo thing is a scam. Mexico has pinto beans, black beans, and green beans. All these other things Rancho is selling are synthetic. Just wait.

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One reason we like to travel is that we learn things.

 

For example, I learned yesterday that the fruit name "avocado" comes from the Aztec word for testicle.

 

Not really, but it's a nice story (that is, the original word was used for testicles like "balls" is used, but primarily meant the fruit)

 

 

p.s. the Mezcal trend is big in Mexico too, of course http://7boom.mx/ocio/las-mejores-mezcalerias-del-df

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You know what? All I've had so far are green beans.

I'm not surprised. I think the whole Rancho Gordo thing is a scam. Mexico has pinto beans, black beans, and green beans. All these other things Rancho is selling are synthetic. Just wait.

 

Plus this Rancho Gordo character himself -- sometimes I think that is not even his real name.

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You know what? All I've had so far are green beans.

I'm not surprised. I think the whole Rancho Gordo thing is a scam. Mexico has pinto beans, black beans, and green beans. All these other things Rancho is selling are synthetic. Just wait.

 

 

I'm not sure about that. I was told by someone in the market that local farmers are compelled to sell their entire bean output to a rich merchant in California or else his minions will kill them and their families.

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One reason we like to travel is that we learn things.

 

For example, I learned yesterday that the fruit name "avocado" comes from the Aztec word for testicle.

 

Not really, but it's a nice story (that is, the original word was used for testicles like "balls" is used, but primarily meant the fruit)

 

 

p.s. the Mezcal trend is big in Mexico too, of course http://7boom.mx/ocio/las-mejores-mezcalerias-del-df

 

 

Another reason we like to travel is that we get lied to by the locals.

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Casa Oaxaca El Restaurante is probably the consensus choice for best restaurant in Oaxaca, now that El Naranjo has decamped (for Austin!).

 

It's on the hauted-up-trad side of things, as opposed to the San Pellegrino side (the SP wannabe will come later in the week). So you get vaguely traditional dishes, using very good ingredients (although, given what I saw at the market, it's only the proteins that could stand much improvement over what's generally available) and clean Yurropean kitchen technique.

 

It's a smash success.

 

I started with taquitos with grasshopper, cheese, other stuff. Nicely done -- although they disappointingly cooked the crunch out of the grasshoppers.

 

Then, venison in mole amarillo. The meat was really, really good -- tender but retaining its flavor. The sauce was deep.

 

Here's a problem, though: the best seats are on the roof, giving you an absolutely gorgeous view, in the dark, down the street to the side of the Santo Domingo complex, where the trees are lit by colored lights at night. It's wonderful: you feel like you're in the nicest place in the world. But the problem: it's dark. You can't see your food. It's like some of Wilfrid's photos times twenty. When eating unfamiliar things, this puts you at a real disadvantage. The visual aspect really counts when you're trying to figure out what's on your plate.

 

Because I was eating in a Fancy Restaurant with an Extensive Wine List, I acted like an idiot and ordered wine -- even though we all know that Wine Does Not Go With Mexican Food. In fact, I recalled afterward, the wine I ordered was one I'd had, similarly stupidly, in Mexico City several years ago, a Baja California red called Ensamble Arenal (II) -- because when I see the Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Syrah, Barbera, and Zinfandel blend, my curiosity overcomes me. Since this food was not very spicy, it wasn't actually a total disaster.

 

Cocktails are pretty good: they do a better job integrating the vast range of excellent local fruit than most places I could find in Bogata (where they get an even vaster range of even better fruit).

 

I hope it's obvious that I highly recommend this place.

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Casa Oaxaca El Restaurante is probably the consensus choice for best restaurant in Oaxaca, now that El Naranjo has decamped (for Austin!).

 

It's on the hauted-up-trad side of things, as opposed to the San Pellegrino side (the SP wannabe will come later in the week). So you get vaguely traditional dishes, using very good ingredients (although, given what I saw at the market, it's only the proteins that could stand much improvement over what's generally available) and clean Yurropean kitchen technique.

 

It's a smash success.

 

I started with taquitos with grasshopper, cheese, other stuff. Nicely done -- although they disappointingly cooked the crunch out of the grasshoppers.

 

Then, venison in mole amarillo. The meat was really, really good -- tender but retaining its flavor. The sauce was deep.

 

Here's a problem, though: the best seats are on the roof, giving you an absolutely gorgeous view, in the dark, down the street to the side of the Santo Domingo complex, where the trees are lit by colored lights at night. It's wonderful: you feel like you're in the nicest place in the world. But the problem: it's dark. You can't see your food. It's like some of Wilfrid's photos times twenty. When eating unfamiliar things, this puts you at a real disadvantage. The visual aspect really counts when you're trying to figure out what's on your plate.

 

Because I was eating in a Fancy Restaurant with an Extensive Wine List, I acted like an idiot and ordered wine -- even though we all know that Wine Does Not Go With Mexican Food. In fact, I recalled afterward, I ordered a Baja California wine I last had in Mexico City, Ensamble Arenal (II) -- because when I see the Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Syrah, Barbera, and Zinfandel blend, my curiosity overcomes me and I can't resist. Since this food was not very spicy, it wasn't actually a total disaster.

 

Cocktails are pretty good: they do a better job integrating the vast range of excellent local fruit than most places I could find in Bogata (where they get an even vaster range of even better fruit).

 

I hope it's obvious that I highly recommend this place.

And when do we get your photos?
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