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Peyton will be back.   Apparently, 2 NFC Championship games and a Superbowl (loss) in three years is not enough to secure your job. Harbaugh is in a "must win" situation in Frisco.   Jerry blames

You mean there's going to be a lot of howling now?

Those damn Cowboys! http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/the-distribution-of-fandom-in-pro-leagues/

And the ever contentious dispute over the extra point: One proposal being bandied about: The scoring team can choose between a 2-point try from the 2 or a 42-yard kick teed up at the 25.

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Word on the street is that the Harbaugh situation is mostly Harbaugh's agent getting ready to play hardball after the season. In any case, save for a disaster of a season in 2014, you can bet Harbaugh will get a ton of money from someone.

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Re Harbaugh in SF. For those of you not following this bizarre story, last week we learned that the SF 49ers shopped Harbaugh to the Cleveland Browns for draft choices but the deal fell through. It seems that the 49ers GM, Trent Baalke, finds it difficult to work with him. Evidently it's stressful to get to 3 championship games in a row. (They lost to the Giants by a field goal in OT in 2011 and this year to Seattle in a poorly officiated game they should have won. Oh yeah - they also won an NFC championship and went to a Superbowl.)

Someone asked John Madden about this.

Former NFL coach and broadcaster John Madden thinks if the day comes when the San Francisco 49ers have to choose between coach Jim Harbaugh and general manager Trent Baalke, the owner should dump Baalke.

“Jim Harbaugh has done a great job of coaching in the NFL no matter how you put it,” John Madden told the KCBS Radio morning crew. “Getting to three championship games in a row with that group or with any group is a heck of a thing that he’s done.”

Harbaugh’s contract expires at the end of the 2015 season.

“You tell me where they’re going to get a guy that’s any better than him?” John asked. “It’s a lot easier to get a suit than it is to get a coach.”

 

 

Amen. Jerry Jones ran Bill Parcells out of town. How did that work out?

 

And then we have the San Diego Chargers. The GM, A.J. Smith, couldn't stand the coach, Marty Schottenheimer. In 2006 the Chargers went 14-2 and lost in the playoffs to the Patriots. Smith saw his chance and got rid of Schottenheimer (lifetime W/L 203-127) and replaced him with the pliable Norv Turner (lifetime W/L 114-122).

 

You'll never guess what happened. Norv and his buddy A.J. hung around for 6 more years. Two weren't bad. The other 4 were mediocre. 8-8, 9-7, 8-8, and 7-9. And this is with the very good Philip Rivers as QB. (A.J had cleverly let Drew Brees move on to New Orleans.) A.J. and Norv, joined at the hip, were shown the door at the end of 2012. Mike McCoy took over as coach and Rivers had a career year.

 

These people never learn.

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The DeBartolos are pretty good at shelling out.

 

I think even more of a story in SF is the word that Kap is looking for $18mm/year.

 

Would make him the 7th highest paid QB in the league.

This is hard to figure. He made $1.2 last year. Romo made $18. Brady made $11. Wilson made $526,000.

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Kap is coming out of his rookie contract? I don't know what Kap's rookie contract was,* but I'm guessing it wasn't very high. and I assume that's an opening demand.

Romo just restructured (as everyone expected from the start).

Wilson is still in the "rookie" contract, which I assume was modest because few people expected this kind of success when Wilson was drafted.

 

*I don't really know how the rookie contracts work in the NFL.

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*I don't really know how the rookie contracts work in the NFL.

 

The structure changed fairly recently. Previously rookies could ask for whatever they wanted. QBs were especially well paid. Often a highly touted but unproven rookie would wind up earning more than most established NFL players. Now there's a cap on rookie contracts.

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First we don't pay you when you're making us millions in college.*

 

Then we'll pay you like a mid-level i-banker* for three years (if you're lucky) while you make us millions.

 

Maybe later you'll get a big payday.**

 

But then we'll cut you, because we've all agreed that you're too expensive because you've been playing here for a bit and there's a cap to the amount we're allowed to pay you guys, sorry.***

 

This is quite the business model they have going on.

 

* Oops, did we say that? I mean you're getting paid through a free education at a top flight institution. Don't blow it while you're practicing and playing and studying football 60 hours a week!

 

** not guaranteed of course!

 

***unless you're our franchise player! Then we love you too much to pay you!

 

**** why are you looking at us? You agreed to that when we told you that you couldn't play until you agreed to it and almost stopped you from earning your mid-level i-banker salary (not guaranteed!) for the one year you were going to be in the league! Yes, I know you felt time pressure to preserve your one big payday, but you agreed!

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The rookie salary cap was agreed to jointly by the players union and the owners. Since the overall team salary cap remains the same what that means is that more money goes to established players, not unproven rookies. For every Russell Wilson there are 10 QBs like Jamarcus Russell, Rex Grossman, Matt Leinart, Ryan Leaf, and Brady Quinn. The rookie cap is fairer to the players as a whole.

 

That said, compared to other sports football's salary structure is medieval. Players are grossly underpaid, can be cut any time, have extremely short careers, and run the risk of brain damage.

 

It's inexcusable.

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The rookie salary cap was agreed to jointly by the players union and the owners. Since the overall team salary cap remains the same what that means is that more money goes to established players, not unproven rookies. For every Russell Wilson there are 10 QBs like Jamarcus Russell, Rex Grossman, Matt Leinart, Ryan Leaf, and Brady Quinn. The rookie cap is fairer to the players as a whole.

 

Why shouldn't rookies get what the market will pay for them?

 

Because established players agreed that they should get less (because they weren't in the league yet).

 

Why would established players do that? Because they want more money for themselves and there's a cap.

 

So why agree to the cap at all? Because the players have a tremendous incentive to reach a quick agreement, even if it's unfair, because each game may represent a significant portion of their lifetime income. Every lost game is huge for most players. The owners can easily wait them out (and they do).

 

If someone wants to overpay for an unproven commodity, let them overpay for an unproven commodity.

 

The whole thing is awful.

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Yeah, it truly is awful when a mediocre baseball pitcher like Phil Hughes can sign a 3 year guaranteed contract for $24 million. $8 million a year. Compare that to the salaries of NFL QBs. Roethlesberger - $5.5 million, Eli - $5.8 million, Brees - $8 million, Brady - $6.6 million.

 

Ridiculous.

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