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joethefoodie

Eater Announces Their Restaurant Critics

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It's the middle of the day. How many of us are reading MF from a desktop/laptop and how many are using a tablet?

 

Maybe these designs are a plot by our bosses to make sure we do our recreational reading at home on tablets.

 

Where's the MF app, anyway?

 

Actually i think compared to most forums MFF looks pretty good on a mobile device.

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And, my guess is that many users access SBNation content while at work using their phones or tablets rather than on their work desktop PC. That way big brother IT doesn't know you what pages you've accessed and how long you've been surfing.

 

I understand the appeal of that but bosses would tend to wonder why their staff is pulling out their personal tablets in the middle of the workday.

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It's the middle of the day. How many of us are reading MF from a desktop/laptop and how many are using a tablet?

 

Maybe these designs are a plot by our bosses to make sure we do our recreational reading at home on tablets.

 

Where's the MF app, anyway?

 

Actually i think compared to most forums MFF looks pretty good on a mobile device.

 

 

It's not too bad. But I've noticed that sometimes when I click on a thread it drops me at the first post instead of the most recent unread one. It happens about 5% of the time.

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And, my guess is that many users access SBNation content while at work using their phones or tablets rather than on their work desktop PC. That way big brother IT doesn't know you what pages you've accessed and how long you've been surfing.

 

I understand the appeal of that but bosses would tend to wonder why their staff is pulling out their personal tablets in the middle of the workday.

Any more than bosses looking at your monitor wondering why SBNation is up?

 

I am the boss here and I use a tablet or my phone for personal surfing most of the time. It isn't uncommon for staff to be looking at their phones or tablets when I walk by and I don't say a word. People used to spend lots more time on personal phone calls than they do now. I tell them if you get your work done within budget and schedule constraints I'm happy.

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And, my guess is that many users access SBNation content while at work using their phones or tablets rather than on their work desktop PC. That way big brother IT doesn't know you what pages you've accessed and how long you've been surfing.

I understand the appeal of that but bosses would tend to wonder why their staff is pulling out their personal tablets in the middle of the workday.

Any more than bosses looking at your monitor wondering why SBNation is up?

 

I am the boss here and I use a tablet or my phone for personal surfing most of the time. It isn't uncommon for staff to be looking at their phones or tablets when I walk by and I don't say a word. People used to spend lots more time on personal phone calls than they do now. I tell them if you get your work done within budget and schedule constraints I'm happy.

 

 

The key to being a successful (and popular) boss.

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I don't know. We're all adults and it isn't like we are on an assembly line. Plus productivity, in general, is going in the right direction.

 

I remember in my first job out of college (1991) pretty much everyone brought a newspaper in with them each day. When they had downtime or needed a mental break they would breeze through all or part of an article.

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My last boss' view was "as long as the work gets done and its good I literally don't care what you are doing or if you are in the office" to the point that while we technically had vacation days in practice we never tracked them and all of us took multiples of the days our employment agreements said.

 

Actually at one point we acquired a business who's head couldn't fathom us not tracking vacation time and kept hassling our COO about it - finally the solution we arrived at was just fabricating a vacation schedule and putting it in the shared drive.

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Ya, I don't know anyone I regularly hang out with who has a job where you have to be in the office or working at any specific time (except for meetings, launch, etc). And there's definitely not an IT dept locking down websites, tracking visited sites, etc.

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Grub Street posted Adam Platt's take on the new Eater restaurant reviews. Some highlights:

  • "I think it's a watershed moment in the development of food-writing for the web. Of course, these days everyone's writing for the web, but until recently, there's been a vague division between critics who write in print and "critics" who write only online. . . . Now, by hiring these highly credentialed critics who will be visiting restaurants repeated times, and paying for their own meals, Eater is saying, The web has grown up. Those days are over."
  • "Clearly they're taking it all very seriously, and the system they've come up with — four stars, anonymous visits, no free food, no mingling with chefs — is straight out of the New York Times playbook. In fact, it's pretty clear that what they want to do is to challenge the Times directly."
  • "But as far as their choice for the stars, and the critics' anonymity, I was a little surprised by how doctrinaire the system is. I mean, this is the web. This is the brave new world. Let's reinvent the wheel here. Let's do something that no one's ever seen before."
  • "Star systems have a way of ensnaring their creators, however. Ryan Sutton has already declared that little Roberta's, this former tumbledown pizza collective out in Bushwick, is a three-star restaurant, which puts it on par, if you believe the Times, or Adam Platt, for that matter, with Manhattan giants like Craft and Gotham Bar and Grill. We'll see how that plays out going forward, but I can already hear the sounds of old-line Manhattan chefs and restaurateurs gnashing their teeth."

As far as I know, Platt is the only major critic who hands out stars, but says repeatedly that he hates the system. (In another interview, he said that the star system was forced on him.) When the L. A. Times dropped stars from its restaurant reviews, Pete Wells published a piece explicitly defending the current system, though he was at pains to say that the stars are not a complete substitute for reading the review. As far as doing "something that no one's ever seen before," I'm not sure what he means, and he doesn't suggest a direction.

 

Platt also says that he's a fan of the idea of the "living review," and at times he has wished he could go back and modify his reviews. This is the one thing Eater's doing that no publication has done, so it'll be interesting to see how that plays out.

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The ageism on Eater is going beyond being annoying to being actively offensive.

 

They know their core demographic.

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the pictures look acceptable and therefore it is good.

 

however, i'm worried that the dhokla could have been mistaken for "cornbread made with white cornmeal". dhokla should be sour/tangy, moist and spicy. and it's sort of hard to tell how gujarati this place really is: sarson da saag is a punjabi dish (it's even a punjabi name); mooli parathas also say punjab not gujarat to me; and it's odd that his "ideal order" involves malai kofta.

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The ageism on Eater is going beyond being annoying to being actively offensive.

 

Sneakeater already saw this on Eater, but....wow, just wow:

 

 

Petrossian doesn't typically mark up its restaurant caviar more than $7 above its retail price; it also offers roe at more reasonable sizes as well — $97 for 30g of its highest grade of transmontanus, or $159 for 50g; a lower price than Russ & Daughters no matter how you spin it.

But really. Would we rather spend our money at a cool joint on the Lower East Side or at some stuffy Midtown institution? There's another point in favor of Russ & Daughters. Call it the cost of cool; remember there aren't a whole lot of casual caviar spots, so there's your pricing power right there.

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