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Chevalier at The Baccarat


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I saw that the Baccarat's bar is opening tonight. No date yet for the main restaurant, Chevalier. This is the place Charles Masson will be running, with Shea Gallante in the kitchen. Modern take on

I recall the good old days when I went to a restaurant for the food. Now I have all these other things to worry about to determine if I had a good time.

I've been to that downstairs bar twice, and both times got a seat with no trouble at all.   I went upstairs only once. The bar was such a madhouse that a guy in a suit wouldn't even let me in the do

 

If Wells gives Chevalier less than three stars, that's a major fail. Personal stylistic preferences shouldn't play into the star rating.

 

Of course, Wells probably WILL fail.

 

If the food's as good as you say, it HAS to get 3 starts, no? Cause otherwise everything else must really suck.

 

 

No, it means that Wells is unable to review things objectively and lets his personal preferences overaffect his ratings. (Which I believe he does.)

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Though I better go for the food.

Honestly, given how much people like Sneakeater are rooting for the place to fail, you'd better not hesitate.

I really think that people here are missing my point. I don't want the place to fail, I'm asking how it gets on "the list" and why it isn't on "the list". the reasons it's not may be deep or shallow, whatever, but for a restaurant serving this kind of food to make it, you want it to be perceived as emp or The modern, not sho.

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How come no one thinks the prime rib with a crab leg for $100 at MCF sends the wrong signal? Or the MCF duck for $150? How is the $24 cocktail st Chevaliet different?

 

 

But doesn't the MCF "trophy dishes" signify that they want to attract the hedge fund kids? I think I might rather spend my night with Wilf at Chevalier.

 

Maybe because they're larger format dishes, meant to feed multiple people as part of an "Asian-style" dinner, similar to the fried chicken/bo ssam dishes Chang does?

 

Or, the large-format cocktails at NoMad.

 

And - hotter crowd.

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I feel like I've seen four-figure Bordeaux on the wine list at Momofuku Noodle Bar [definitely at Ssäm]? But I didn't take this as evidence that the wines were being used to attract younger banksters so much as evidence that these are the sorts of places where rising young professionals go now, so management might as well throw in some wines they could impulsively splurge on, especially if celebrating.

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The $200-$300 figure isn't the standard tariff here. It's two courses for $74, three for $96, and unlike the cocktails that's the going rate in the neighborhood.

 

Excitingly, it now offers lunch for $42.

 

 

i was just going by your recommendation that the place is best done if done all the way and taion's subsequent tab.

 

but three courses including dessert? at any rate $96 plus wine plus tax and tip and you're pretty much at $200, no?

 

not to confuse oakapple but if i lived in nyc and could afford to eat here i'd do it at least once. but $200/head meals are not for me in general, regardless of room or language of greeting. i've only done one of those (manresa), and even at $150 i'd rather spend that money on sushi most days of the year. i prefer to spend vast amounts of money on bottles of whisky, you see.

 

 

Right, but there's a difference between $200 and $300. The $96 price puts it precisely in line, within a dollar of two with other midtown restaurants--Betony, The Modern, Marea, Ai Fiore, Aureole. Yes, you easily push that up to $200 all in, but if you're not paying that price, you're not eating fancy food in midtown.

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1. I think Sneakeater is offended by Chevalier for idiosyncratic reasons that don't apply to most of us, especially those of us who are not native to NYC.

 

 

 

I did wonder if there's a cultural thing going on here, but I thought it might be an American v European thing rather than a New York thing.

 

I just went back and found my charge at Chevalier: $303 all in. Tasting menu, wine pairings, and I suspect I probably had ordered a glass of bubbly before the wine pairings started. So that's kind of the ceiling price, unless you're ordering boutique bottles of wine.

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Though I better go for the food.

Honestly, given how much people like Sneakeater are rooting for the place to fail, you'd better not hesitate.

I really think that people here are missing my point. I don't want the place to fail, I'm asking how it gets on "the list" and why it isn't on "the list". the reasons it's not may be deep or shallow, whatever, but for a restaurant serving this kind of food to make it, you want it to be perceived as emp or The modern, not sho.

 

 

Isn't it a little early to say how people perceive it? Has anyone seen any other reviews?

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How come no one thinks the prime rib with a crab leg for $100 at MCF sends the wrong signal? Or the MCF duck for $150? How is the $24 cocktail st Chevaliet different?

Grey goose.

 

 

Yeah, that's one cocktail. Most of the $24 cocktails have luxe, $80-$100 retail ingredients. Marea will charge you $35 for a cocktain with Remy XO.

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