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Chevalier at The Baccarat


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Seriously, I think the $22 cocktails are overpriced (although only by $3 to $4). The $24 cocktails are mostly fairly priced for what's in them. I'm sure you can get a champagne cocktail for $18 down the road, but probably not made with Ruinart rose.

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I saw that the Baccarat's bar is opening tonight. No date yet for the main restaurant, Chevalier. This is the place Charles Masson will be running, with Shea Gallante in the kitchen. Modern take on

I recall the good old days when I went to a restaurant for the food. Now I have all these other things to worry about to determine if I had a good time.

I've been to that downstairs bar twice, and both times got a seat with no trouble at all.   I went upstairs only once. The bar was such a madhouse that a guy in a suit wouldn't even let me in the do

I just went back and found my charge at Chevalier: $303 all in. Tasting menu, wine pairings, and I suspect I probably had ordered a glass of bubbly before the wine pairings started. So that's kind of the ceiling price, unless you're ordering boutique bottles of wine.

My check was about 10% more per person.

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I really think that people here are missing my point. I don't want the place to fail, I'm asking how it gets on "the list" and why it isn't on "the list". the reasons it's not may be deep or shallow, whatever, but for a restaurant serving this kind of food to make it, you want it to be perceived as emp or The modern, not sho.

 

The Modern opened as a two-star restaurant. That would almost certainly have been a death sentence, except for: 1) It had a captive museum audience; 2) It had a casual bar room attached; 3) It had a major restaurant empire behind it, that could afford to wait for critical consensus to catch up (as it eventually did).

 

Eleven Madison Park opened as a two-star restaurant, and was largely off the food media radar for many years, before Danny Meyer changed chefs, and only very gradually ratcheted it up to what EMP is now.

 

I will reiterate that sensible people ought to recognize shallow objections for what they are. On the Del Posto thread, Orik says he went there and was greeted in Italian, and there was no one to say, "Oh! The horror!!!"

 

When someone says they're offended by "Bonjour," the correct response is to slap them up the backside, and tell them that they really need to seriously re-think their biases.

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I really think that people here are missing my point. I don't want the place to fail, I'm asking how it gets on "the list" and why it isn't on "the list". the reasons it's not may be deep or shallow, whatever, but for a restaurant serving this kind of food to make it, you want it to be perceived as emp or The modern, not sho.

 

The Modern opened as a two-star restaurant. That would almost certainly have been a death sentence, except for: 1) It had a captive museum audience; 2) It had a casual bar room attached; 3) It had a major restaurant empire behind it, that could afford to wait for critical consensus to catch up (as it eventually did).

 

Eleven Madison Park opened as a two-star restaurant, and was largely off the food media radar for many years, before Danny Meyer changed chefs, and only very gradually ratcheted it up to what EMP is now.

 

I will reiterate that sensible people ought to recognize shallow objections for what they are. On the Del Posto thread, Orik says he went there and was greeted in Italian, and there was no one to say, "Oh! The horror!!!"

 

When someone says they're offended by "Bonjour," the correct response is to slap them up the backside, and tell them that they really need to seriously re-think their biases.

I think a 3-star NY Times review would put it on what Adrian describes as "the list." When Betony opened in May 2013, we ate there several times during the next few months. Diners were not exactly flocking there. That changed dramatically in August when Wells gave it 3 stars. Literally overnight, it became a difficult reservation.

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For what it's worth, I never claimed to be offended.

 

Absolutely understood, and nobody has even said that all servers are addressing everyone in French. This really is just "Someone said 'Bonjour' to Taion."

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...once you get past all the offensive cultural signifiers.

 

Offensive to some people here, not to others.

 

 

I finally got around to reading that Guy Trebay write-up (in which I assume the restaurant -- or at least the hotel that owns it -- was complicit). There was not a single cultural signifier referenced in it that wasn't offensive to me. Not one.

 

And I can't believe I'm so very idiosyncratic here, and that there aren't a lot of other people who don't share my sensibility.

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There is nothing wrong with this, exactly, but stand back from the process and you see that it is institutional or, worse yet, suburban. It lacks chic. Or, anyway, that is how Charles Masson sees it. And Masson should know. As the maître d’ and the face of his family’s fabled Midtown restaurant, La Grenouille, he spent decades analyzing and refining the elements of the dining ritual. Masson is a man who hunted down light bulbs in just the right hue to flatter the complexions of guests not necessarily in the first blush of youth. He is a stickler who can calculate with stopwatch precision the time required to transport a freshly napped quenelle de brochet lyonnaise from kitchen to table before the sauce starts to congeal (45 seconds). He is a consummate professional who—having given the matter thought—arrived at the conclusion that the most refined way to present butter to diners is in tight little volutes shaved off a block with the warmed edge of a spoon.

 

How about that? I wonder if they do it tableside?

 

9 stars in France over the past 12 days (two 3s, one 2, one 1) and not a single butter curl or cloche. I can't imagine that L'Ambroisie's PR team is trumpeting their butter service.

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Well, you can't say Passard's l'Arpege without saying Bordier demi-sel (served not too cold) and pain fabrication maison. (now you'll say - this is about quality and that about pretentious presentation but I'm not so sure)

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Well, you can't say Passard's l'Arpege without saying Bordier demi-sel (served not too cold) and pain fabrication maison. (now you'll say - this is about quality and that about pretentious presentation but I'm not so sure)

I was going to write that, actually. It's pr too and may be about pretentiousness, I don't know, but my point is about marketing, not substance. passard is marketing the quality of the butter, not that the maitre' found the chicest way to serve the butter.

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