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Chevalier at The Baccarat


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I saw that the Baccarat's bar is opening tonight. No date yet for the main restaurant, Chevalier. This is the place Charles Masson will be running, with Shea Gallante in the kitchen. Modern take on

I recall the good old days when I went to a restaurant for the food. Now I have all these other things to worry about to determine if I had a good time.

I've been to that downstairs bar twice, and both times got a seat with no trouble at all.   I went upstairs only once. The bar was such a madhouse that a guy in a suit wouldn't even let me in the do

 

My guess is that gk (and almost certainly the modern) is distinguishable ...

Having visited them all within the past year, my guess is that Chevalier's cuisine is much more contemporary than the food at the other two places. Service was good at all three. I know nobody else likes the environment at Chevalier, but The Modern is tremendously monochrome, and GK--although it has some pleasant touches in the decor--is just so vast and impersonal (you see your server approaching from a quarter of a mile away).

 

Yes, the restaurants can be distinguished, but perhaps not in the way you imagine.

I can't speak to that. Sneak and taion seem to Think you can.
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It's not about how modern the cooking is. The hottest ticket in Toronto right now (the Joe beef pop up at the Hearn) is probably serving the most traditional French food of any restaurant in North America right now.

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It's not about how modern the cooking is.

 

Well it is, because Sneak referred to the restaurant as being in a "now dead style," which led me to question whether that included the food (it didn't, of course); and you then said something about how "gk (and almost certainly the modern) is distinguishable"--and I would say one thing that distinguishes them from Chevalier is that the food they are serving is much more old-fashioned "haute cuisine" than what Gallante is doing.

 

We can not talk about the food, of course, but that's what I was saying about the food and its relative modernity.

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I'd really like to hear someone defend that room at The Modern. It's so glum.

 

(And although it's not about food, The Modern's foie tart, lobster potage, and medallions of lamb in a fierce reduction is just the kind of meal you'd all hope--blindly prejudiced as you all are--that Chevalier would serve.)

 

We should rename MouthfulsFood. How about MouthfulsAmbience?

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It's not about how modern the cooking is.

 

Well it is, because Sneak referred to the restaurant as being in a "now dead style," which led me to question whether that included the food (it didn't, of course); and you then said something about how "gk (and almost certainly the modern) is distinguishable"--and I would say one thing that distinguishes them from Chevalier is that the food they are serving is much more old-fashioned "haute cuisine" than what Gallante is doing.

 

We can not talk about the food, of course, but that's what I was saying about the food and its relative modernity.

 

 

Which is not at all what the rest of us were talking about.

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I'd really like to hear someone defend that room at The Modern. It's so glum.

 

(And although it's not about food, The Modern's foie tart, lobster potage, and medallions of lamb in a fierce reduction is just the kind of meal you'd all hope--blindly prejudiced as you all are--that Chevalier would serve.)

 

We should rename MouthfulsFood. How about MouthfulsAmbience?

 

Surely you would never argue that food is ALL that matters in dining out.

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Of course not, but when you have excellent food, good service, and an environment which is at least functionally comfortable (even if you don't like the trappings), the volume of dissent about the restaurant becomes highly suspicious.

 

Indeed, as I've said before, I think things like the price of a cocktail, the ghost of Charles Masson, someone saying "Monsieur," and the "eeeewness" of the ambience are all obvious surrogates for the kind of people you suspect of using the place.

 

Confess!

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