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Can't help myself...polenta is almost always made with coarse ground cornmeal. Gnocchi alla Romagna is made with fine semolina[wheat].

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Thing is gnocchi aren't necessarily potato gnocchi, although that's become almost an automatic assumption in New York. The menu when I was there read gnocchi sardi, not Roman gnocchi, so maybe Sietsema got something different from me (looks the same); but it's pasta, not much like polenta.

 

 

Never heard of gnocchi sardi, only gnocchetti sardi (malloreddus), different from gnocchi alla romana (semolina latkes). (you have to be careful because the essence of Italian cuisine is how exactly the wet dough is shaped and what you call it)

 

eta:

 

soft green chickpeas the likes of which you’ve probably never seen before.

 

 

It's okay, Sietsema, the police won't stop you for smoking that joint on the street... get out from under the rock.

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Yes and Roman gnocchi is usually made with semolina (polenta).

 

Can't help myself...polenta is almost always made with coarse ground cornmeal. Gnocchi alla Romagna is made with fine semolina[wheat].

 

Thanks for doing this before me.

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Garofalo or Gnocchi sardi: this looks like the stuff I was served at Faro.

 

One of my minor complaints was that although the pasta is made in-house (I'm told), I could easily have believed it was something like Garofalo. Siestema evidently got something quite different.

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I thought it was called "Farro".

 

(I guess this goes in the "You Learn Something New Every Day" thread.)

 

Turns out it's called "Farro but I didn't bother with spellcheck"

 

 

It's named Faro after the Italian and Spanish word for lighthouse or beacon, other Romance languages have words with similar spelling and/or pronunciation. Confuses the fuck out of everybody, especially since the place is focused on grains and the logo includes the words Earth Wheat Fire.

 

(And no, Sietsema does not fact check anything, including the origin of a name of reviewed place.)

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Garofalo or Gnocchi sardi: this looks like the stuff I was served at Faro.

 

One of my minor complaints was that although the pasta is made in-house (I'm told), I could easily have believed it was something like Garofalo. Siestema evidently got something quite different.

 

he did, those are completely different dishes. the menu changes weekly, sometimes more often. the pasta shapes/types and sauces shuffle too, sometimes.

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I didn't fact check on the name, but I more or less guessed right. To me, the beacon thing makes perfect sense in that location. NE KIngdom used to be literally the only lit windows after dark there. But the faro/farro thing is confusing.

 

Faro Shines A Light

[Pigging by Wilfrid: June 1, 2015] Faro shines a light, because faro, Italian, beacon... Okay, what I should really say it that it shines yet another light on what was once a dark block off the largely dark main drag of Wyckoff Avenue ...

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I thought it was called "Farro".

 

(I guess this goes in the "You Learn Something New Every Day" thread.)

 

Turns out it's called "Farro but I didn't bother with spellcheck"

 

 

It's named Faro after the Italian and Spanish word for lighthouse or beacon, other Romance languages have words with similar spelling and/or pronunciation. Confuses the fuck out of everybody, especially since the place is focused on grains and the logo includes the words Earth Wheat Fire.

 

(And no, Sietsema does not fact check anything, including the origin of a name of reviewed place.)

 

 

You mean like Aldea is a village in proto-Iberian?

 

eta: of course not dismissing the possibility that it was intentional, but it'd be more believable /natural as il faro.

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It would have made everyone's life easier if they had called it Farro (including mine, I work with them*). They did not want to go with an Italian name - despite the grain/pasta focus, it's not an Italian restaurant (even though everyone on Yelp seems to think that because pasta=Italian, tell that to Daniel, etc. - every French chef seems to be doing pasta now) - it's hyper seasonal American - that's why a word that has the same meaning in different languages was appealing.

 

(*and am getting emails addressed to "FARO Pasta")

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Well, I still don't know if it's simply a glay case or not (if I were doing PR for a restaurant of course I'd make everyone swear it's intentional) but it doesn't matter much if the food is good and hyper what you said.

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I think the most unlikely explanation is Sietsema's. :)

 

They can spell farro okay on the menu, when it means farro.

 

Oh I just typed "farto." There's a name.

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Again, let's not forget Aldea, which at best is Galician without that pesky Portuguese i in there. As easy for me to believe Sietsema's explanation as the other one, which I'd expect to have seen in the original PR blurbs (instead several sources that seem to be fed at least in part by Nux mention it's a Greek word, which it isn't. Go figure.)

 

 

p.s. Around the corner we have this place called "Gar Eden". When talking to publicists, they swear it's intentional and they never meant to be called Gan Eden, but if you take into account the famous local lack of ability to transcribe English characters, you can see what happened there http://jto.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/cg-restaurant-20140627-Gar-Eden.jpg

 

eta: getting back to our other thread - how can anyone "fact check" if there's a PR agency telling the restaurant what "facts" to deliver?

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It would have made everyone's life easier if they had called it Farro (including mine, I work with them*). They did not want to go with an Italian name - despite the grain/pasta focus, it's not an Italian restaurant (even though everyone on Yelp seems to think that because pasta=Italian, tell that to Daniel, etc. - every French chef seems to be doing pasta now) - it's hyper seasonal American - that's why a word that has the same meaning in different languages was appealing.

 

(*and am getting emails addressed to "FARO Pasta")

I knew that, especially since the cavatelli that Sietsema liked suffers from the Syndrome of Too Much. Pork ragout + pureed ricotta + parsley? Okay, whatever.

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