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I would think that the way the argument will be set up is that if Apple left the door open (to disabling the erasure command), then they can be compelled to walk through it. Or some better way to put it (BLOCK THAT METAPHOR!).

 

I'll bet some legislation will come out of this -- although more likely than not it won't be legislation the pro-privacy side will like. (Time for everybody who cares to dirty their hands with practical politics!)

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is the issue here techology? I assume that any information on an iPhone would be obtainable by warrant if it were in hard copy. And isn't Apply at the forefront of destroying consumer's privacy by c

The iPhone – choice of discerning terrorists around the world.

They're just trying to get some sales from the terrorist contingent by highlighting the advantages of newer models.

the DOJ has filed a brief: https://cdn1.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/6071331/apple-iphone-encryption-doj_filing-february_19.0.pdf

 

we should get Apple's response sometime in the next week. my guess is the Court will make some factual requests of the parties, there will be a hearing, the loser will appeal etc.

 

but you can start having opinions on the subject once we see the reply brief :)

 

my initial instincts are with Apple on this one but the tech press really needs to stop saying things like "the government relies upon an archaic law from 1789"....well the magna carta is even a trifle older than that.

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Trump calls for a boycott of Apple products until they comply with the government's request.

The universe of Trump supporters and the universe of Apple users does not coincide.

 

Do they even intersect? Are they within a billion light years of each other?

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You have more faith in a businessman like Tim Cook than judges? Really???????????????? This is sad. Really sad.

I think it's important to note that Tim Cook can't put you in jail. Heck, he can't even make you buy his overpriced electronics.

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I would think that the way the argument will be set up is that if Apple left the door open (to disabling the erasure command), then they can be compelled to walk through it. Or some better way to put it (BLOCK THAT METAPHOR!).

 

I'll bet some legislation will come out of this -- although more likely than not it won't be legislation the pro-privacy side will like. (Time for everybody who cares to dirty their hands with practical politics!)

There are a lot of interesting questions raised by this case. I can see how the government could compel Apple to turn over existing information, but how could the government compel Apple to create software to assist the FBI with their investigation? Isn't that the FBI's job? How much would the government pay for the software? Could Apple charge them a billion dollars? Should they be compelled to create the software, could Apple then sue the government for damaging their products' reputation for security?

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The irony is they probably won't get much from this, or what they get they will already know. But, of course, the implications for our privacy are somewhat at risk.

What privacy? Really. It doesn't exist.

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I would think that the way the argument will be set up is that if Apple left the door open (to disabling the erasure command), then they can be compelled to walk through it. Or some better way to put it (BLOCK THAT METAPHOR!).

 

I'll bet some legislation will come out of this -- although more likely than not it won't be legislation the pro-privacy side will like. (Time for everybody who cares to dirty their hands with practical politics!)

There are a lot of interesting questions raised by this case. I can see how the government could compel Apple to turn over existing information, but how could the government compel Apple to create software to assist the FBI with their investigation? Isn't that the FBI's job? How much would the government pay for the software? Could Apple charge them a billion dollars? Should they be compelled to create the software, could Apple then sue the government for damaging their products' reputation for security?

 

 

Buckets of precedents there - the baby bells created tools for the fbi and other agencies to be able to wiretap some percentage of calls (and, apparently, to receive all call metadata). The government pays for that. Likewise (at least based on various leaks), facilities were provided for listening in on internet traffic. Historically this was priced at break-even, but I suspect that for at least the past 15 years, it's a profitable business for telcos.

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The irony is they probably won't get much from this, or what they get they will already know. But, of course, the implications for our privacy are somewhat at risk.

What privacy? Really. It doesn't exist.

 

I fantasize that there's still a little left.

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The irony is they probably won't get much from this, or what they get they will already know. But, of course, the implications for our privacy are somewhat at risk.

What privacy? Really. It doesn't exist.

 

 

There's theoretical privacy, and then there's cost-adjusted privacy. It's likely that if the government, or someone at Google HQ, or one of many seedy android application developers, wanted to know a lot about you, they could. However, it's unlikely that they'll bother unless it represents sufficiently high value to them (so if google can make an extra $0.003/month from you by optimizing their ads, that's about as much as it's worth for them to invade your privacy). What's relatively new isn't that this can be done (they could always tap your verizon line, put bugs in your apartment, follow you around, etc.) but that with monitoring costs following a moore's-law-like curve, it becomes much more compelling to do on a large scale.

 

In short - if the fbi pays $1000 to wiretap your land line and two cell phones today then they probably think about it twice and get a warrant to justify the expenditure. If they can suddenly do it for $0.001 then they'll figure out a way to get very broad warrants.

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