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The way I see it, once you say that NO food in New York is as good as French food in Paris, the problem then isn't that French food in New York isn't as good as French food in Paris (that's only to be

Further on down the road, before attending a show last night, we stopped here for a glass or two and a bite or two.  Now I do remember the last meal we ate here, absolutely hating my pasta (it was aft

I love old Leslie Gore singles. I listen to them all the time. But I would never claim they’re objectively good the way Bach is good or Prince is good or Ornette Coleman is good.

Among places I've been, and for the type of dining out we like to do...Paris, yes.

 

I wouldn't be that unhappy in Madrid or Barcelona or even San Sebastian, though there I'd probably grow at least somewhat tired of great pinxtos and seafood.

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But I don't think "The Best" is very important.  It's just that NY isn't in a class with the very best, be it Madrid, Barcelona, Rome, Lyon, Bologna, etc.

 

Just understand that you are using a very peculiar definition of great food city that excludes places like London and Singapore and Sydney, and it's a very different definition of great food city than most people use. 

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But I don't think "The Best" is very important.  It's just that NY isn't in a class with the very best, be it Madrid, Barcelona, Rome, Lyon, Bologna, etc.

 

Just understand that you are using a very peculiar definition of great food city that excludes places like London and Singapore and Sydney, and it's a very different definition of great food city than most people use. 

 

 

If I knew London better, it would certainly enter my fray; via 2 5-day stays, I really enjoyed the restaurant culture we experienced.

 

Montreal is a pretty darn good food city from what I've experienced.

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the reason why we have a shit food culture is the Dutch (or calvinists or something)

 

Tokyo can do all that and more btw. HK and Singapore probably as well. Tho maybe more Asian rather than LatAm focused.

 

Again, I agree that, from what I've heard (never been there) Tokyo, HK & Singapore would be able to beat Seth's tour (EXCEPT for the L.American, which is a big except).  However, Seth could've taken them to the Brighton/S'head Bay Area of Brooklyn and done a completely different tour of E.European (not just Russian, but Dongan, Belarussian and others) with similar results.  And Tokyo doesnt have that (although some other places do).  Bottom line from reading all the posts on 3 or more threads addressing this issue:  it depends on what your definition of "better" is.  I'll stick with NYC being the better place for me to live, given my definition.  But... I can see doing Paris.

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LOL, it's actually in Europe but not any city mentioned. However, of the cities mentioned, I don't get Barcelona - at all.

I think to even start "getting" a city, a week or two is necessary. Doesn't have to be all at once, but more than a few days overall for sure.

 

Barcelona has great markets (not necessarily that one), and some really excellent dining at price/value.

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On any scheme NYC's peer group are the big cosmopolitan global cities, not Madrid or Rome which are driven by a powerful local vernacular and the rest is an adjunct to that. Its not a comparison that makes sense. And I love Madrid dining. 

 

NYC, London, Tokyo, HK, maybe Singapore.  I think Tokyo clearly wins on that list. HK is probably too weak on western food, London weak on LatAm & East Asian, NYC on South Asian and some forms of East Asian.  On the local food front that drives 80% of eating its Tokyo and HK in a walkover.  Its just I prefer a slice to a bowl of ramen.

 

( I think you'd be tired of BCN inside of 6 months - especially given its increasing abandonment by locals)

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West African, Greek, and Egyptian aren’t NATVE food cultures.

 

People mention Ital-Amer and Ashkenazic because in the first case it was a pronounced local adaptation of a foreign cuisine and in the second case everybody who didn’t come here was murdered.

I completely disagree.  Who decides what's "native" and what isn't? My point was that, while West African cooking is newer to NYC than Ashkenazic, after four-plus decades, it's become intrinsic to the city's dining landscape, even if food media and most people don't treat it that way.

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Italian American cooking, as a regional form of Italian cooking, was created in and around nyc.

 

Ashkenazi American cooking (and the various styles of shops and restaurants representing it) was also created in and around nyc.

 

Western African cuisine was not created in and around nyc and is barely represented here. Saying that such restaurants exist is like saying they exist in Paris, Lisbon, or Madrid, and as you point out, the arbiters of culture - "media" and "most people" don't see them as intrinsic or important to the local food culture. 

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